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View Full Version : Factory enclosed heated underbelly


Tifgilm
12-31-2010, 04:43 PM
Hello, we have a 2005 Jayco jayflight 28rls without the enclosed underbelly and we would like to see what the cost is to add a factory option to this, as we would like to use it in -10 temps...any advice?

dom424
12-31-2010, 06:49 PM
Dealer told me about $900 for a 24 RKS about a year ago.

Denise
01-02-2011, 04:12 PM
Welcome to the Jayco Owners Forum Dom424! Our heated enclosed underbelly was ordered from factory was quoted at original $371 but discounted cost was $260. I couldn't tell you what it would be for aftermarket install. :)

dom424
01-02-2011, 05:26 PM
Thanks, I should have read more carefully. The 900 was what the dealer quoted me after I purchased the TT if I wanted to add it.

Spike99
01-05-2011, 08:12 AM
Personally, I rate factory underbelly insulation as a thin layer of fibre glass insulation (that holds critters and water - which is very bad) and is very "over rated" within the RV industry. YES. Very over rated. If you want proper insulation under your 5er/TT/RV, get it done properly. Get the underside sprayed by a certifieed contractor with Closed Cell 2 lbs Spray Foam. If wondering, I got the underside of my wife's 2006 Jayco 29FBS Spray Foamed and its after results were amazing. Based on before and after results, I strongly feel the all trailers must use Spray Foam insulation - professional grade (not those cheap DIY kits). And for our next 5er/TT/RV, I'd get its under belly spray foamed again.

For before and after pictures, surf:

Before:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_2046.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_2055.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0658.jpg

After:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0695.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0700.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0696.jpg

Note: We only Spring, Summer, Fall camp within our seasonal site TT. Thus, we did NOT get out TT's tanks sprayed. But if we did winter camping, I'd apply a 12V heat blanked on the bottom of each holding tank (to create 12V heated tanks) and spray foam the underside of them as well.

If wondering, my local Spray Foam contactor charged me $900 Canadian (which is often 1/3 higher cost then USA dollars) for 3.5"-4.0" of Closed Cell - 2lbs at 10ft wide by 24ft long. For same size TT in USA, Spray Foaming its underbelly should be approx $600-$800 range. Knowing the before and after results are amazing. I'd get spray foam done again - without hesitation...

Hope this helps in your research...

.

Denise
01-05-2011, 10:21 AM
Thanks, I should have read more carefully. The 900 was what the dealer quoted me after I purchased the TT if I wanted to add it.

What a mark-up, huh! For that price, you could actually insulate as Spike did


Personally, I rate factory underbelly insulation as a thin layer of fibre glass insulation (that holds critters and water - which is very bad) and is very "over rated" within the RV industry. YES. Very over rated. .


The one thing I don't like about the enclosed underbelly is that we can't see what's going on under the trailer :( . However for our purposes, we don't camp in freezing weather (unless it uncharacteristically dips into the low 30's in the middle of night)... and our climate stays above freezing year round. However, when it does dip down to the low 30's all we have to do is turn the heater on and we don't have to worry about winterizing for just those few days and thus serves it's purpose for us :)

FastFiveO
01-05-2011, 01:15 PM
Personally, I rate factory underbelly insulation as a thin layer of fibre glass insulation (that holds critters and water - which is very bad) and is very "over rated" within the RV industry. YES. Very over rated. If you want proper insulation under your 5er/TT/RV, get it done properly. Get the underside sprayed by a certifieed contractor with Closed Cell 2 lbs Spray Foam. If wondering, I got the underside of my wife's 2006 Jayco 29FBS Spray Foamed and its after results were amazing. Based on before and after results, I strongly feel the all trailers must use Spray Foam insulation - professional grade (not those cheap DIY kits). And for our next 5er/TT/RV, I'd get its under belly spray foamed again.

For before and after pictures, surf:

Before:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_2046.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_2055.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0658.jpg

After:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0695.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0700.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0696.jpg

Note: We only Spring, Summer, Fall camp within our seasonal site TT. Thus, we did NOT get out TT's tanks sprayed. But if we did winter camping, I'd apply a 12V heat blanked on the bottom of each holding tank (to create 12V heated tanks) and spray foam the underside of them as well.

If wondering, my local Spray Foam contactor charged me $900 Canadian (which is often 1/3 higher cost then USA dollars) for 3.5"-4.0" of Closed Cell - 2lbs at 10ft wide by 24ft long. For same size TT in USA, Spray Foaming its underbelly should be approx $600-$800 range. Knowing the before and after results are amazing. I'd get spray foam done again - without hesitation...

Hope this helps in your research...

.

Thats a great idea...

Crabman
01-05-2011, 05:10 PM
I have to wonder how comfortable it would be at -10 in a Jayflight, especially with the wind blowing hard, which only has R7 insulation and by is no means considered a "four season" trailer like some of the heavier built Eagle and Arctic Fox trailers with polar packages and such. I suspect the furnace and propane bill would get a workout too. Not saying it can`t be done, I`ve only camped as low as 24 above at night but warming up during the day with mine WITHOUT enclosed underbelly and all went well so I have no experience at those low temps. It`s just not what these trailers were really built for IMO. But you may be just fine, I suppose you won`t know til you try it.

If you enclose the belly remember you still have to heat the tanks and plumbing. Some trailers have heat from the furnace ducted to the tanks and plumbing. Others use the 12 volt heaters as mentioned. Good luck. -Lee

Spike99
01-05-2011, 08:19 PM
For a good video about comparing traditonal Fiberglass to Spray Foam (for insulation, critter living reduction, water entry resistance, etc, etc.), surf entire video at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBu19XyBLLA

Comparison speaks for itself....

If planning to get your trailer's underbelly insulated, do get professional grade spray foam. As I posted above, before and after comparison is amazing. To me. all RVs trailers need to use Professional Grade Foam....

.

Denise
01-05-2011, 11:30 PM
FYI... I'm not sure, but I would think that the heated enclosed underbelly would be more for folks like us who don't deal with freezing weather. If you plan to be in freezing temps, you might want to consider a package that is something like the advertised Polar Package:confused: One thing I know for sure, even though we have that heated enclosed underbelly, we won't be heading for the snow with our Jay Flight G2! :)

Seann45
01-06-2011, 07:51 AM
You can do the enclosed underbelly yourself very easily with plasticor (plastic cardboard) it will reduce air friction under your trailer when towing... Not sure if I would spray insulation in there though.. if you ever had to work on something under there it would be a real pain... extra fiberglass insulation might be a good idea though.

Spike99
01-06-2011, 03:34 PM
I don't camp in freezing cold weather either. Too much "hassle" with dumping, external water pipes, frozen doors/windows and running and furnace more often then it needs to. To me, stick houses are made for winter months. RVs are made for "fun time" summer months. If I cannot camp in a spring coat or T-shirt (or less), then camping isn't fun. I got back to my stick house.

Do keep in mind that insulation (like high efficiency Spray Foam) is great for hot summer months as well. Better then factory insulation forces the AC unit work much less and thus, much quieter inside your RV/TT as well.

Some say that spray foam (on floors, walls and ceiling cavities) allows its insides to be headed with a candle. Same is reverse in the hot summer months. re: Cool the insides with a frozen popsicle.

If our TT's roof or walls need repairing, I'll be applying Professional Grade CC - 2 lbs in their cavities as well. Spray foam "tightens up" its construction and creates huge energy efficiency. And, can take water abuse as well.

IMO, installing plasticor (plastic cardboard) on the 5ers/TTs underbelly allows critters a very comfortable floor to stand on. Once standing on this floor, they drill "upwards" - with their front legs. And this plasticor (plastic cardboard) creates little wind resistance benefits. Especially when the 5er/TT is tucked behind its Tow Vehicle - that is taking the bulk of the head wind.

Professional Grade Spray Foam (Closed Cell - 2 lbs) is amazing stuff. Well worth using within TTs, 5ers and RVs.

Good luck...

.

TexasA&M
01-07-2011, 08:45 AM
So where can you get something like this done? I've got the factory underbelly, but I'd like to at least get a DIY kit so that I can fill in any of the holes that are underneath (mainly to keep the critters out).

Spike99
01-07-2011, 11:26 AM
.

The first step in getting a contractor to apply Spray Foam to TTs / 5ers underbelly is to obtain financial estimates. Many companies will provide "over the phone" estimates (based on provided measurements - like 10ft x 25 ft x 3.5" thick) and others need to see your situation first. Some companies can visit your TT/5er using their Mobile truck/trailer and others ask you to bring your tt/5er to their shop (to be inspected withih their well lighted Spray Foam booths).

To obtain initial financial estimates, simply use Google Search - to find the Spray Faom companies within your area. For example (for your Austin Texas region), surf the many URLs within: http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&safe=off&biw=1576&bih=686&q=austin+spray+foam&aq=f&aqi=g2g-v4&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&fp=abf023fa88c5b3eb

If into DIY Spray kits, surf http://www.rhhfoamsystems.com/ When using DIY kits, remember to order 20% more square footage - for "learning curve" waste. From my experience, "contractor grade" Spray Foam (applied by a certified contractor) is much better approach. And, remember to use Close Cell - 2 lbs. 1 lbs is too light (fluffy) and Open Cell cannot take water exposure. For TTs/5ers/RVs, only use CC - 2 lbs Spray Foam.

Note: Do shop around because estimates do "dramatically" vary. When obtaining cost estimates for my TT, the cost range was double - from different contractors. And, they used a product that wasn't very good either. Like any consumer purchase items, do shop wisely (for price and product quality).

If you feel "applying" spray foam is within your wallet depth, the next step is to prepare your TTs / 5ers underbelly. Simply remove existing underbelly panels, fabric materials and existing Fiber Glass insulation. And, prepare the underside for spraying. The more you can prepare, they less cost they charge you. Like paining a vehicle, the master sprayer guy comes in, sprays and leaves. You don't want to pay an expensive master painter to waste time on incorrect prep work. Same approach applies to spray foaming a TT (or insides of a refridgeration truck).

For initial preparation tasks of existing insulation removals, surf:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0594.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0601.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0602.jpg

With underside wood floor exposed, Re-route all under belly wires into nice straight and smooth 90 degree corner runs. And, install all wiring within over sized plastic loom as well. Wire loom can be fastened to under floor wood using galvanized steel strapping and 1/2" wood screws. If you need to replace a future wire, simply re-fish the wire into to over sized plastic loom. Push fiberglass between the tanks under floor gaps as well. If spray foam is applied within the tank / floor gap, the foam will expand and press the tanks down. Thus, warping the top of the tank or could break its holding straps. Simply push fiber glass insulation between tank and its gap. Or, apply blockage material in this gap area.

For example:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0658.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0657.jpg

Remember to apply barrier cover under the tubs gooseneck as well. Thus, reducing spray foam getting into the underside of the tub. For example: http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_2056.jpg

Then, apply plastic sheets around items that cannot be sprayed. For example, tank valves, slide out gears, slide out motors, etc. etc. And, apply pastic to reduce over spray on unwanted areas as well. After spray foam, simply remove this plastic.

For example:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0670.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0669.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0672.jpg

If you plan to install future wiring (like 12V brake wiring replacement) or 12V wiring for additional lighting, install a 3/4" PVC pipe with split out boxes every 10 feet. When you plan to install future wiring, simply fish the wiring into this pipe.

For example:
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0664.jpg
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w251/Spike99-Pictures/Seasonal%20Camp%20Site/100_0688.jpg

The above is how I replaced the factory fiber glass insulation with Contractor Grade Spray Foam under our 2006 Jayco. For our next TT / 5er, I'd do this upgrade again - without hesitation.

Good luck in your TT/5er insulation upgrades...

.

TexasA&M
01-07-2011, 01:07 PM
Dang Spike, excellent info!! Can you come to Austin and help me do this???:p

Spike99
01-08-2011, 07:43 AM
Dang Spike, excellent info!! Can you come to Austin and help me do this???:p

If I was in your Austin area, I'd love to help you out. Doing projects like this is easy for me. Being previous auto-body repair person, I've learned a few prep skills - that apply to this project as well.

When the Contractor spray foamed the underbelly of my TT, I wasn't able to video the task. He suggested I stay clear - unless I had protective clothing and a mask on. I would have loved videoing how 3.5" of spray foam was applied and how it expanded into the many cracks / holes (left by the TT factory).

To view the insides of a Sprinter van being sprayed, surf: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrHSAMzi3a4 Same Closed Cell foam was used on this project as well. For temperature "stability" and many other benefits, spray foam is amazing stuff.

Hope this helps as well....

.

cekkk
01-11-2011, 10:22 AM
As I read the specs, the Polar Package is available only on the 5ers. I sure wanted it on our ordered 320RLDS. I talked to a guy in Arizona a couple weeks ago who had a 35' Eagle tt, don't know how old. I noticed he had a Polar Package decal by his door. Wonder why they discontinued it. Actually, I would only expect to gain another couple of weeks to our season up here anyway, so it's no great loss. Current temperature - minus 8 F.

lou1216gc
01-17-2011, 09:56 PM
For a good video about comparing traditonal Fiberglass to Spray Foam (for insulation, critter living reduction, water entry resistance, etc, etc.), surf entire video at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBu19XyBLLA

Comparison speaks for itself....

If planning to get your trailer's underbelly insulated, do get professional grade spray foam. As I posted above, before and after comparison is amazing. To me. all RVs trailers need to use Professional Grade Foam....

.

The more I read your post Spike the more I like you.:D I do HVAC for a living and we are NATE and BPI (building performance institute) certified and in my opinion whether its your house or TT spray foam is definitely the way to go. You sent me those pics before about STAR wiring for brakes, was actually gonna ask you about the foam and who did it. Its gotta make a huge difference for summer and winter.

On another note, I am curious how much weight this adds to TT. I know its foam but its dense. Did you ever ask that question spike? would you have an estimate? This is something I would like to do to mine in the spring.