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Old 02-09-2016, 04:46 PM   #11
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Thank you for all your responses. We are thinking of upgrading to something a little larger and wanted to see what other's experiences were. We do love our Tundra and hope to keep it for many years.
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Old 02-09-2016, 04:51 PM   #12
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Had a 2010 Tundra with the 5.7 and towed a 6500 lbs 22 foot older camper. Truck handled the trailer at any speed with ease (had E4 weight distribution hitch). Towing I got between 9-11 depending on speed.

Bought my 29QBS, 34 feet long and 8500 lbs loaded and really felt the weight. Towing mileage dropped to 7.5-8. That is really poor with only a 26 gallon tank. The deal breaker was my pin weight was too high, had to get a heavier truck.

The 5.7 made tons of power, brakes felt good. With a good WDH it handled fine. I had airbags to help with heavier tongue weight, but it always felt like I was pushing my luck.
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Old 02-10-2016, 08:35 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by rabontte View Post
Thank you for all your responses. We are thinking of upgrading to something a little larger and wanted to see what other's experiences were. We do love our Tundra and hope to keep it for many years.
The Tundra can definitely handle a larger trailer, but keep an eye on the tongue and cargo weight vs. the trucks cargo capacity. That is usually the limiting factor with the Tundra. This capacity can be found on the sticker on the driver's door frame and is typically around 1500 lbs. The 1500 lbs. is what you can safely carry which includes the weight of passengers, pets, cargo, and tongue weight. When looking at "dry" tongue (hitch) weights, you have to add the weight of any cargo and water you add to the front of the trailer, plus the propane, (60lbs) battery, (65lbs) and weight distribution hitch (100lbs). As long as you keep the "wet" tongue weight and cargo weight under your listed cargo capacity, you should be fine.
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Old 02-10-2016, 04:12 PM   #14
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Not sure what I'm looking at on this sticker? Where is the total weight limit of the truck and trailer combined?
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Old 02-10-2016, 05:11 PM   #15
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There should be a second sticker in the same area or in the glove box. I can post a picture later tonight if needed.
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Old 02-10-2016, 05:32 PM   #16
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I don't have access to my Tundra right right now, but here is one from a Ford.
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Old 02-10-2016, 05:37 PM   #17
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Not sure what I'm looking at on this sticker? Where is the total weight limit of the truck and trailer combined?
For that number you will have to look in the owners manual.
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Old 02-10-2016, 05:52 PM   #18
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We tow with a Tundra relative, the Sequoia. It has the smaller 4.6 V8 and tows just fine. We get about 10-11mph when towing between 55 and 60mph. We've had the truck since new 10 years ago and it still runs like the day we first drove it home. I don't mind the smaller fuel tank because we need to stop every few hours any ways to stretch our legs and to let all aboard take a "break". We tow a 23MB with ours.

That's good to hear. We have a 2006 Tundra with the 4.7 V8 and we will be towing a similar TT that we just bought. It's the Jay Feather 23 BHM. Have been wondering what to expect when towing, so this is reassuring.

And my truck has 140k miles and it has had the brake pads changed out. That's it in 10 years. Still have the original battery and everything. Well I should say that's pretty much it. I did the 90k service and they swapped out the belt and the water pump. Neither were bad, it was just recommended. Unbelievable truck!
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Old 02-10-2016, 06:28 PM   #19
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We tow a 26BH and run loaded considering it is just 2 of us. Trailer weighs 6800# and combo sits right around 14,000# I use a ProPride hitch so we never have to worry about sway and can tow at pretty much any speed comfortably. We usually tow between 60 and 65 depending on the road. I run in manual 5th gear and am not afraid of WOT! I average right at 9 most of the time. Mine has the 5.7L and 4.30 gears. I also have the factory towing mirrors and a TRD rear sway bar.
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Old 02-10-2016, 06:54 PM   #20
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IMHO, the valuable numbers are on the first sticker. Specifically the Front and Rear GAWR (gross axle weight ratings). These are the weights each axle is designed to safely carry.
A visit to a CAT Scale will show you what they currently weigh. The difference between the current weight and the GAWR is the additional weight (cargo) that can be safely added (for each axle).
The weight a TT adds will affect the rear axle more that the front. A full fuel tank will add weight and a hitch can add in the neighborhood of 100# and any "stuff" you load into the bed and people in the TV will use some of your available cargo. Whatever is left will roughly be what you can add in tongue weight.
The next bit is a bit more complicated.
Let's say that you load the tribe, throw some gear in the bed (ice chest, chairs...), fill the tank and hit the scale. Your scale ticket says the rear axle weighs 3200#. Since your Rear GAWR is 4100#, you can add 900# of additional cargo before overloading the rear axle.
Take 100# for a hitch and you are left with 800# of cargo.
Given these numbers (remember this is just an example) I would aim for a tongue weight of around 600#.
The tongue weight should be about 15% of the TT. So, divide 600 by 0.15 and we get 4000#. Again, IMHO, in this example a TT of about 4000# would be the max I would consider (give or take a couple hundred-it's only an example, right?).
So the starting point is the CAT Scale. I've made 3 trips over and the first one was intimidating (I was dancing with the 18-wheelers). But after reading the how-to on this forum I got my weights. The next 2 trips were a snap.
The CAT Scale is your friend.
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