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Old 07-17-2015, 03:32 PM   #1
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Trailer Tire Facts

Trailer Tire Facts - courtesy of Jagiven
I have posted this a few times recently, and think it would be a great sticky talking about trailer tires. There is a lot of good information.

http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/inf...erTireFacts.do

Trailer Tire Facts
Trailer Tire Applications
• Trailer tires are designed for use on trailer axle positions only. They are not built to handle the loads applied to, or the traction required by, drive or steering axles.
Inflation
• Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
• Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
• If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
• Under inflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.
Load Carrying Capacity
• All tires must be identical in size for the tires to properly manage the weight of the trailer.
• The combined capacity of the tires must equal or exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the axle.
• The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent.
• If the actual weight is not available, use the trailer GVW. If a tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side. The remaining tire is likely to have been subjected to excessive loading.
• If the tires are replaced with tires of larger diameter, the tongue height may need to be adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.
Speed
• All "ST" tires have a maximum speed rating of 65 mph.
• As heat builds up, the tire's structure starts to disintegrate and weaken.
• The load carrying capacity gradually decreases as the heat and stresses generated by higher speed increases.
Time
• Time and the elements weaken a trailer tire.
• In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone.
• Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire.
• It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.
Mileage
• Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
• The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.
• The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles.
Why Use An "ST" Tire
• "ST" tires feature materials and construction to meet the higher load requirements and demands of trailering.
• The polyester cords are bigger than they would be for a comparable "P" or "LT" tire.
• The steel cords have a larger diameter and greater tensile strength to meet the additional load requirements.
• "ST" tire rubber compounds contain more chemicals to resist weather and ozone cracking.
Storage
• The ideal storage for trailer tires is in a cool, dark garage at maximum inflation.
• Use tire covers to protect the tires from direct sunlight.
• Use thin plywood sections between the tire and the pavement.
• For long term storage, put the trailer on blocks to take the weight off the tires. Then lower the air pressure and cover the tires to protect them from direct sunlight.
Maintenance
• Clean the tires using mild soap and water.
• Do not use tire-care products containing alcohol or petroleum distillates.
• Inspect the tires for any cuts, snags, bulges or punctures.
• Check the inflation before towing and again before the return trip.
Keys to Avoiding Trouble
• Make sure your rig is equipped with the proper tires.
• Maintain the tires meticulously.
• Replace trailer tires every three to five years, whether they look like they're worn out or not.
Trailer Tire Warranty
• The Carlisle trailer tire warranty applies to the original purchaser for three years from the date of purchase or until the tread depth reaches 3/32".
• The OE (original equipment) warranty goes into effect at the time of the trailer purchase
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Old 07-17-2015, 05:17 PM   #2
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Thanks for the great info! I've had TT and towmax tires for 18 months now and was considering purchasing new tires sometime next year...gives me good info to consider!
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Old 07-17-2015, 05:21 PM   #3
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A great sticky!
Thanks Jag and Nort!!
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Old 07-17-2015, 06:45 PM   #4
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I know that historically ST tires have had a speed rating of 65 mph. Recently I had to replace a couple of defective tires while on a trip and bought (reluctantly), Carlisle Radial Trail RH Trailer Tires ST225 /75 R15 117N E1 BSW; I ended up buying two more to make a full set of the same tires a couple of weeks later.

According to the Discount Tire Direct website, with the 117N rating these tires have a load rating (clicky) of 2833 pounds and a speed rating (clicky) of 87 MPH. I do not advocate towing a trailer at 87 MPH; I do not tow a trailer at 87 MPH. But, it appears that Carlisle has tested at 87 MPH; maybe they will be more resistant to breaking belts, throwing treads, and disintegrating. Maybe.

So far, I've got 2800 miles on them on a trip in June and July of this year from Texas to South Dakota and back - and I've got the same tires on the trailer as I left with.
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Old 07-18-2015, 04:18 AM   #5
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Great info, thanks for posting!
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Old 07-21-2015, 01:56 PM   #6
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If you want to be anal about something, let it be your tires.

Check the pressure at least once a week. Monitor the pressure and temperature somehow, TPMS, good pressure gauge and a laser temperature gauge to check tire and hub temps when you stop while traveling.

A good physical inspection is also a habit that may pay off someday in a big way. A tread separation is very obvious if you know what to look for.

Any time your vehicle is worked on, check the tire pressure before leaving the dealership. They are famous for rotating tires and not adjusting the pressure.
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Old 07-21-2015, 02:08 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVhiker View Post
I know that historically ST tires have had a speed rating of 65 mph. Recently I had to replace a couple of defective tires while on a trip and bought (reluctantly), Carlisle Radial Trail RH Trailer Tires ST225 /75 R15 117N E1 BSW; I ended up buying two more to make a full set of the same tires a couple of weeks later.

According to the Discount Tire Direct website, with the 117N rating these tires have a load rating (clicky) of 2833 pounds and a speed rating (clicky) of 87 MPH. I do not advocate towing a trailer at 87 MPH; I do not tow a trailer at 87 MPH. But, it appears that Carlisle has tested at 87 MPH; maybe they will be more resistant to breaking belts, throwing treads, and disintegrating. Maybe.

So far, I've got 2800 miles on them on a trip in June and July of this year from Texas to South Dakota and back - and I've got the same tires on the trailer as I left with.

I noticed this as well on the specs for the Maxxis I purchased last Fall. It says "Speed Rating Q 100 MPH"

Maxxis ST205/75R15 D M8008 ST RADIAL | Real Deal Tires
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:19 PM   #8
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So, this thread had me wondering about the Carlisle RH's speed rating, so I called and talked to a gentleman at Carlisle that gave some interesting info!!!

The 15" RH Radials were indeed rated at 87mph, but due to our govt placing a tariff of 15" tires rated at 87mph they have been lowered to an 81mph speed rating. 16" are rated for 75mph, I think he said the 14" were 87mph but not sure if the rating was lowered like the 15" tires.

Knowing that the tires are rated higher than the old 65mph rating gives peace of mind for the safety factor.
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Old 08-21-2015, 08:36 PM   #9
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From Carlisle site
How fast can I travel on Carlisle trailer tires?

In the past, most trailer tires were rated at 62 or 65 mph. Today, some of our tires are "rated" (speed symbols) at 87 mph (N), some at 75 mph (L), some at 65 mph (J: ST tires) and some at 62 mph (J: non-metric tires).

Please remember that speed ratings are test speeds and not recommended driving speeds. The ratings apply only to the tire itself, and not a particular vehicle. The speed rating does not mean that the vehicle can be safely operated at the tire's rated speed.

We recommend driving no more than 60 mph when towing a trailer. Please always drive at a safe speed and abide by the posted speed limit.
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Old 08-24-2015, 08:49 PM   #10
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Just today I had a conversation with service manager because that didn't inflate the tires properly on a recent service call. The sticker on the trailer says 65 lbs as do the tires He stated this was to high. The pressure on the tires after service was average 50psi. I appreciate your post. I will call Jayco.
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