Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-02-2016, 10:37 AM   #71
Senior Member
 
Dustdevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Orange County
Posts: 328
OK, so a trip report on the AC insulation issue. We cut our trip short. Not because of anything with the AC or the motorhome. But because there were no darn birds in Blythe. But I digress.

As it turns out, the AC insulation trick was awesome! We landed in Blythe on Wednesday in the heat of the day, about 109 degrees with moderate humidity. Had started the AC earlier on the road by running the genset, but it was still about 88 degrees in there. When we parked, we plugged in, and the temp gradually decreased about maybe 6 degrees an hour inside until it met the preset of 75 on the thermostats. Both AC running, with the rear AC blowing forward. Front AC unit is ducted throughout the coach body. So, in a few hours, it was very cool, and the sun was going down. AC actually cycled at night. Just left it on early yesterday as we left the campground. It stayed cool the entire time. Yesterday was projected to be hotter than Wednesday, but the morning actually felt cooler (maybe only 102 or so). But so far, my assessment is that the insulation worked like a champ in very high temps. Most of the motorhome was in direct sun. We did have reflectix covers on all windows except one, including the cab side windows and windshield. That helps tremendously.

This was a great mod to do, and it makes the AC system work less to keep up with the heat. It's a fair amount of work if you want to do it right, but very much worth the effort, and the $25 expense.
__________________

__________________
2006 Jayco Seneca 34SS
2006 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Toad
Dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 10:48 AM   #72
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Jackson
Posts: 726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camper_bob View Post
How exactly did you seal the vent holes in the ceiling to the vent holes cut in the duct? I looked at mine yesterday and found some of the same issues you have (not a great seal, and the "sleeve" sticks up into the duct blocking flow), but I'm not quite sure how to solve them yet. I was thinking of removing the cylindrical sleeve and just running foil tape from the ceiling into the hole in the duct. That would seal off the attic space completely. But I'm afraid there won't be enough ceiling to get the tape good adhesion. And there would be nothing behind the tape to support it. There is no insulation around the vent holes. I guess I could put something there? And I guess my adhesion fears would be mitigated when I screw the vent "fascia" back up?
How are you guys removing the little louver circular vent piece from the ceiling to even see inside? I'd like to take mine apart to see if I can tighten it up too.
__________________

__________________
2015 Greyhawk 29MV

Jopopsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 11:57 AM   #73
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Dale Hollow Lake Tn/Ky
Posts: 1,497
This thread is starting to sound like the governments justification for "climate change". So far several people have done the mod and only a couple have given the AC a hard test since it was installed. There reports range from seems to have helped to a definite helped a lot. Even the helped a lot said it took the AC running for a while via the onboard genny and then several hours to get the coach down to to 74. Since all of this completely lacks any scientific proof all we have is speculation or I think it did. What I would like to hear is something like a previous experience in similar temps to the after the mod results. Something like 4 hours to get to set point vs 6 or more hours.

No offense but RV'ers are pretty much always looking for ways to help with cronic issues but this one still sounds like "its pretty easy and low cost to do so why not give it a shot".
Bassdogs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 12:19 PM   #74
Senior Member
 
Dustdevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Orange County
Posts: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassdogs View Post
This thread is starting to sound like the governments justification for "climate change". So far several people have done the mod and only a couple have given the AC a hard test since it was installed. There reports range from seems to have helped to a definite helped a lot. Even the helped a lot said it took the AC running for a while via the onboard genny and then several hours to get the coach down to to 74. Since all of this completely lacks any scientific proof all we have is speculation or I think it did. What I would like to hear is something like a previous experience in similar temps to the after the mod results. Something like 4 hours to get to set point vs 6 or more hours.

No offense but RV'ers are pretty much always looking for ways to help with cronic issues but this one still sounds like "its pretty easy and low cost to do so why not give it a shot".
I don't have a previous trip into 109 degree temps to compare to, but I do have a previous experience to use as something of a comparison. In temps of around 92 degrees, the front AC, which is ducted to the entire coach, was not able to reduce the temps more than about 2 degrees in two hours, despite about half the windows (all the large ones) covered with reflectix.

So, do I have an identical experience to compare in a fully scientific test? No. Do I realize this is a fairly dramatic improvement? Yes, I think that's what I'm conveying. Doesn't mean everyone's results will be the same. Depends heavily upon the ducting itself (the ducting in the older Senecas is constructed in the "attic", and has its own internal factory-included insulation setup on the inside of the ducts. It also depends upon whether the AC system(s) itself is adequately sized. In our case, it's a 34 ft unit with one 15k and one 13.5k system on the roof, which requires a 50 amp connection (or the genset, which is adequately sized to run both under most conditions).

I think for those who are venturing into temps of high-90s, and expecting the system with these mods to get them down to the 70's internal temp range, this mod will not only help make that possible, but will likely result in the compressor not having to run continuously. These are temps of 109, which most people will never see, and with the coach almost entirely in direct sunlight.

Personally, my past experience is with a trailer with aluminum siding (transfers far more heat than fiberglass) and loose fiberglass batting (vs the styrofoam and vacuum bonded construction that Jayco uses on these units). That single 13.5K AC unit was adequate, but required about half a day to eventually bring down temps, and ran continuously.

Each system is different in various models of RV. I think everything we can do to improve cooling and insulate hot from cold is a help with these units, regardless. So, everyone who has different Jayco models and years will likely experience different results. I think it also depends very heavily upon how clean the coils are in the condenser coil. Mine were pretty clean, so I didn't bother to hose them out. Your results may vary.
__________________
2006 Jayco Seneca 34SS
2006 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Toad
Dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 06:01 PM   #75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Dale Hollow Lake Tn/Ky
Posts: 1,497
MY 2014 W Hawk is sitting in my back yard in direct sun. Have used 2 times recently when kids visited and the wife and I moved to the RV. With temps 95 and total direct sun, I ventilated the TT for about an hour using the roof mounted fantastic fan and a couple windows opened about 6 inches in the main cabin. After an hour I fired up the 15k AC unit and set the digital tstat to 76. I started all this at about 3pm with the AC coming on around 4pm with outside temps still in mid 90's. At 6:30 I took went out to set the DVR to record a couple thing that evening and the unit had cycled off after meeting the 76 degree set point. Actual AC run time 2 1/2 hours and don't really know when it cycled off. At that point I lowered the set point to 73 for the night.

I have not tried the instillation mod so can't say if it would help, but 2 1/2 hours plus an hour of venting to suck out the 100 degree temp inside the closed up TT is pretty darn good that would not justify this mod for me.
Bassdogs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2016, 10:08 PM   #76
Senior Member
 
Dustdevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Orange County
Posts: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassdogs View Post
MY 2014 W Hawk is sitting in my back yard in direct sun. Have used 2 times recently when kids visited and the wife and I moved to the RV. With temps 95 and total direct sun, I ventilated the TT for about an hour using the roof mounted fantastic fan and a couple windows opened about 6 inches in the main cabin. After an hour I fired up the 15k AC unit and set the digital tstat to 76. I started all this at about 3pm with the AC coming on around 4pm with outside temps still in mid 90's. At 6:30 I took went out to set the DVR to record a couple thing that evening and the unit had cycled off after meeting the 76 degree set point. Actual AC run time 2 1/2 hours and don't really know when it cycled off. At that point I lowered the set point to 73 for the night.

I have not tried the instillation mod so can't say if it would help, but 2 1/2 hours plus an hour of venting to suck out the 100 degree temp inside the closed up TT is pretty darn good that would not justify this mod for me.
One good thing about living in a free country is that each can decide for themselves.
Dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2016, 07:06 PM   #77
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Picture Rocks
Posts: 9
ac vent

This is what I did to mine. I was surprised at how shallow the duct is in the ceiling.
Attached Thumbnails
image.jpg  
__________________
Bob & Shelly, Bella & Missy (pitbull mix & maine coon)
2016 North Point 341RLTS
2015 Ram 3500 4x4 CC LB DRW
B&W 3600 Companion
2006 Terry Dakota (traded)
PR Travelers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 09:35 PM   #78
Senior Member
 
Dustdevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Orange County
Posts: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by PR Travelers View Post
This is what I did to mine. I was surprised at how shallow the duct is in the ceiling.
The ducts in my Seneca are fairly shallow also. The difference is that in the Seneca, there is no space or air gap between the hole in the ceiling panel and the hole in the duct. It's just as if they are the same panel. No tape is required.
__________________
2006 Jayco Seneca 34SS
2006 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Toad
Dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016, 09:47 PM   #79
Senior Member
 
Dustdevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Orange County
Posts: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jopopsy View Post
How are you guys removing the little louver circular vent piece from the ceiling to even see inside? I'd like to take mine apart to see if I can tighten it up too.
Not sure what you are referring to. IF it's the outside, the cover over the AC is held on with three screws. In the rear unit, the round louvered cover is taken off first, then the main cover can be removed also, by lifting straight up. Front AC has a similar overall look, it's louvered cover is largely a part of the rest of the A/C cover.

If it's the inside, then my covers are rectangular, with a thin open cell foam material inside as a filter. They come off with just four screws or four quick panel anchors. Either way, it's pretty easy to get them off and review what's up in the box. Your units may vary significantly.
__________________
2006 Jayco Seneca 34SS
2006 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Toad
Dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2016, 08:48 AM   #80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Texas
Posts: 3,799
So, I insulated the top, cold side of the AC unit along with the cold coolant hose. I don't have scientific conclusions, but things seem to work better in our trailer.

One of the reasons I can't really say whether the insulation on the AC unit helped is that we changed A LOT of things on the trailer at the same time. I sealed off each vent directly to the duct work, I sealed off the return side of the unit from the "cold" side, I closed off a dead end on the front duct, we removed a wall, and I performed the insulation mod and rinsed off the coils while I was up there.

So, after all of those items, the AC seems to be working better. It was pretty hot last weekend, but it was VERY humid. We've camped in hotter weather though. The AC was able to cool the trailer to a set temp of 75 within a few hours of setup (the unit cycled off before sunset, we arrived around 3:00 pm) with an outside temp in the mid 90's and a "feels like" of over 100. We had shade for all but an hour or two during the day, so I'm sure that helped as well. We also kept the awning out almost the entire trip, and that side of the trailer was facing West, so I'm sure that made some difference.

So, while I don't have "scientific" results, I will say that there is an improvement. Certainly worth the cost (which was basically $0 for me since I had the materials already, and that's for ALL the stuff I did) and the time and effort. Even if you have to buy the materials, and it helps a little, it's worth it IMO.

The coils weren't really that dirty, but I think I'll add this chore to my annual maintenance list. It can't hurt to keep them clean, right?
__________________

__________________


2014 Jay Flight 28 BHBE
2015 RAM 2500 6.4L HEMI, Tradesman 4x4, 3.73
Blue Ox SwayPro (BXW 1503)

Upgraded from an REI internal frame backpack and a Eureka 1/2 dome tent!
Camper_bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.