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Old 09-04-2015, 12:55 AM   #31
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Lots of things to consider. Budget? What will the vehicle be used for when not towing, if anything? How big of a toad do you need? How bad do you want another vehicle around and have expense of license, storage, insurance? Do you have a vehicle now that can be modified for towing? Are you planning to flat tow or tow using a dolly? How close do you want to push your GCVW limit? Whatever you tow, you really should have a brake system (required in many states). If you don't overload your RV, you probably have capacity to tow up to 5,000 with a typical class C, but in my opinion I would try to keep the weight of the toad around 3,000# or less.
A good resource for vehicles that can be towed, and what restrictions if any can be found at http://towingworld.com/resources/2015DinghyGuide.pdf
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Old 10-18-2016, 07:39 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by rcdurango View Post
Just went this route, 31 ft. Melboure, towd is a 2015 Jeep Wrangler. Blue Ox tow bar 10K
Plate that fits the jeep and wired by Professional installer, $ 1800.00. Also installed Brake Buddy with brake away switch. $ 950.00 on Amazon.
Jeep owners manual says, Transfer case in neutral, Transmission in park, Key on to allow steering wheel to turn. No problems!
Brake system is a must, really makes a difference when stopping in a hurry.
Hope this was helpful.
I have a brake "buddy" that loses it's it's brain after going over a rough spot such as Railway tracks, and even after braking hard. I have tried the jogging up until the brake lights come on, then back two jogs; I have tried taking the legs off; next will try making a wood base for it; but feel that it shouldn't be this difficult. Any suggestions would be welcome.
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Old 10-18-2016, 10:36 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by dlongson View Post
I have a brake "buddy" that loses it's it's brain after going over a rough spot such as Railway tracks, and even after braking hard. I have tried the jogging up until the brake lights come on, then back two jogs; I have tried taking the legs off; next will try making a wood base for it; but feel that it shouldn't be this difficult. Any suggestions would be welcome.
Contact the manufacturer. They are all really good about providing support, and replacements when needed.
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Old 10-18-2016, 12:34 PM   #34
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OK. I see you bought the Jeep Wrangler. Good choice! I happen to tow an older 2006 Wrangler Unlimited (this one is a two door). Jeeps are pretty towable and easy to set up. You do have to pay attention to do it right, to ensure you preserve your transmission, etc. Transfer case in neutral. Trans in gear (manual) or Park (auto). In my case, the key has to stay in the ignition, since I have a locking steering column. So, I lock the doors and take the extra keys in the motorhome. I also have a hidden security system to reduce the likelihood of theft.

I customized my wiring. Not so much on the turn signals and brake lights. There I used a wiring harness from etrailer so the Jeep lights would obey the motorhome, not the Jeep brake pedal. I also added a custom battery charging circuit so the motorhome alternator will keep the Jeep battery charged. The aux braking system uses the Jeep battery for power, and I don't want it depleted on longer trips. That causes all sorts of headaches. So, the battery charge circuit works very well at keeping the Jeep battery topped off all the time the motorhome is running.
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Old 10-27-2016, 01:17 AM   #35
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I was towing a Toyota Tacoma size pickup. Weight 4,400# and decided that was too heavy, so outfitted a Fiat 500. Both manual tranny. The only problem is I could see the pickup when I went around corners. Can't see the fiat unless Someone gets out there and looks. We only travel with the wife and I and only need transportation for two when we are on the road, and the Fiat 500 is a sporty little car to drive. The Fiat only weighs 2300#
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Old 10-29-2016, 06:45 PM   #36
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So for anyone towing a Jeep thats uncertain of the procedure, Jeeps website had the owners manuals for download. Jeep Owners | Download an Owners Manual 2004 - 2011 | Jeep In the manual it has specific instructions for both manual and automatic trans. We put our on an iPad and can take it with to the jeep if we forget between seasons or there are questions. I think for the newer ones its page 43. Its certainly nice that newer jeeps don't need the key in the ignition at all. On long trips we installed a battery disconnect so we could avoid possible drainage and then direct wired a 12v socket plug to run our brake controller. Hope this helps.
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Old 11-08-2016, 03:50 PM   #37
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We are faced with another dilemma... which vehicle to bring along, and it always depends on where we are going. Only the Equinox is capable of being flat towed, the Toyota FJ has to have all wheels off the pavement and the 65 Belair has to go on a trailer. We opted to go with a trailer that can handle them all - and the ATV as well as most trips are boondocking where we are riding offroad.

With the Seneca fully loaded and the Toyota and ATV on the trailer - we are right at our 33k GCVW limit. The only downside with this trailer is where I have to hunt for places to load/unload the BelAir, as the breakover is high with short ramps.
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Old 11-08-2016, 04:22 PM   #38
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At least when not towing a car four down you have the advantage of being able to back up when needed!
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