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Old 07-13-2016, 05:59 PM   #31
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My 15 has the steel, but I prefer the wood. Gave them room for more insulation, the ability to run the A/C ducting better and also the ceiling panels could be attached better. It also would be less heat/cold transfer.
The Jayco guy said they used Batt-type insulation in the roof. I wish they would do a foamed in insulation once the roof was built, IMHO you would have an even stronger roof AND it wouldn't settle after a few thousand miles down our nation's wonderful highways and goat trails. Not saying all our highways are bumpy...I found one in Wyoming last year that was nice! And then there was the highway in...okay, no it was... Dang, guess that was the only one!
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Old 07-13-2016, 06:00 PM   #32
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The drawback to foamed in place is if you ever have to chase wiring or get into the area. Yikes!
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Old 07-15-2016, 09:59 AM   #33
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I received this email from a the Jayco representative today in answer to my concerns about wood vs. steel roofs:
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2016 9:10 AM
To: D_B Travelers

Subject: RE: Jayco Wood truss roof

D_B Travelers,
The potential problems I’ve seen over the years with using aluminum & galvanized steel has to do with strength & insulation transfer. I have a Canadian friend that showed me pictures of his 5th wheel having aluminum rafters after a light snow fall. He had probably 3” of snow on the roof with the snow only sitting on the roof between EVERY rafter. The heat from his furnace transferred right through the rafter and melted the snow away. This would not happen if it was a wood rafter. Canadian manufacturers out west that build trailers for oil workers only use wood. Also use Plywood vs. OSB for the same reason as the cold will transfer through the glue on OSB vs. the solid Plywood.
I see the problem with Galvanized steel having the same effect on heat transfer but also the strength when you walk on the roof or if your frame has some flex when traveling as this can twist front & back rafters. It doesn’t take much strength to twist the galvanized steel as the gauge used is very minimal.

I suppose a manufacturer could create an aluminum or galvanized rafter to create a 6” roof but none exist. Jayco’s rafters are 6” from side to side and do not taper like other 5th wheels which limit your insulation on each side of your camper throughout the length. Remember, if you smash the insulation, you lose R-values which is also what needs to happen when you taper your rafters.

Hope this information helps you Darrell. These are based on my opinions for 16 years of manufacturing for multiple companies having different production practices.
Thank you and please let me know if you have any further questions.
As he is a regional employee and not speaking for Jayco other than his opinion and experience, he asked that I not publish his name. In a previous email he stated he has been in the RV business for 16 years, recently joined Jayco. He has corresponded with me through several emails and has seem very genuine and willing to supply information. Hope this helps out there.
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Old 07-15-2016, 01:53 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D_B Travelers View Post
I received this email from a the Jayco representative today in answer to my concerns about wood vs. steel roofs:
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2016 9:10 AM
To: D_B Travelers

Subject: RE: Jayco Wood truss roof

D_B Travelers,
The potential problems I’ve seen over the years with using aluminum & galvanized steel has to do with strength & insulation transfer. I have a Canadian friend that showed me pictures of his 5th wheel having aluminum rafters after a light snow fall. He had probably 3” of snow on the roof with the snow only sitting on the roof between EVERY rafter. The heat from his furnace transferred right through the rafter and melted the snow away. This would not happen if it was a wood rafter. Canadian manufacturers out west that build trailers for oil workers only use wood. Also use Plywood vs. OSB for the same reason as the cold will transfer through the glue on OSB vs. the solid Plywood.
I see the problem with Galvanized steel having the same effect on heat transfer but also the strength when you walk on the roof or if your frame has some flex when traveling as this can twist front & back rafters. It doesn’t take much strength to twist the galvanized steel as the gauge used is very minimal.

I suppose a manufacturer could create an aluminum or galvanized rafter to create a 6” roof but none exist. Jayco’s rafters are 6” from side to side and do not taper like other 5th wheels which limit your insulation on each side of your camper throughout the length. Remember, if you smash the insulation, you lose R-values which is also what needs to happen when you taper your rafters.

Hope this information helps you Darrell. These are based on my opinions for 16 years of manufacturing for multiple companies having different production practices.
Thank you and please let me know if you have any further questions.
As he is a regional employee and not speaking for Jayco other than his opinion and experience, he asked that I not publish his name. In a previous email he stated he has been in the RV business for 16 years, recently joined Jayco. He has corresponded with me through several emails and has seem very genuine and willing to supply information. Hope this helps out there.
With a line like that, that regional manager should have been in the plant additive business. Like Jayco never heard of thermal breaks? He wouldn't be the first Jayco rep I know of who didn't know his product very well. I will give him what he said about compressing insulation though—that was spot on—but they could easily build an aluminum or steel roof that would be 6" from side to side and would be just as strong and flex free as a wood one, if not more so, and would be lighter. I'm sure the real reason for wood roofs is they are cheaper to build.
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:11 PM   #35
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." It doesn’t take much strength to twist the galvanized steel as the gauge used is very minimal."

I think the key is "the guage of metal used".
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:19 PM   #36
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The drawback to foamed in place is if you ever have to chase wiring or get into the area. Yikes!
Foamed in place insulation would be superior but would significantly slow down the production line. Premade billets would be a bit less expensive material wise and could have channels molded or cut into the bottom to serve as chases for wiring running fore and aft and spacers molded on the bottom to allow a small space between the ceiling panel and the billets for wiring running from side to side. The wiring could be installed before insulating, pretty much the way it is done now and slapping in the billets wouldn't take much longer, if any longer, than slapping in glass.

The biggest reason they don't use foam billets is they cost more.
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:28 PM   #37
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." It doesn’t take much strength to twist the galvanized steel as the gauge used is very minimal."

I think the key is "the guage of metal used".
Exactly. Not to mention the truss would stiffen up quite a bit when the roof is screwed down to it. It all depends on the design. One can support the weight of a dictionary with a piece of letter sized paper as long as the paper has been rolled into a tube. Flanges on a stamped, sheet metal truss would significantly stiffen it.
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:41 PM   #38
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All I know is that the crowned roof on my 06 Seneca is infinitely stiffer to walk on than the flat roof on my old toy hauler. The toy hauler also had a wood frame and wood rafters. But the flat design I'm sure had a significant role in making it feel springy just with my own weight. It held up just fine, despite my climbing up there numerous times over 15 years to wash and condition the rubber membrane.
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Old 09-19-2016, 11:14 AM   #39
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I'm a bit confused as to the roof construction on my '14 Premier. I emailed Jayco CS to clarify.

The brochure says stamped steel and the cutaway drawing looks like stamped steel. The brochure says 3/8" decking. It says "Stamped steel Magnum Truss Roof System" in the features list.

The construction detail PDF for '14 says 1/4" decking and the picture looks like square tube aluminum. It describes it as MagnumRoof System and shows wood trusses.

I'm installing solar panels so I'd really like to know what I'm dealing with before I start making holes.
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Old 09-19-2016, 12:11 PM   #40
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Dropped the bathroom vent trim. I have stamped steel trusses and 3/8" roof decking.
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