Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-15-2016, 08:30 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Bowling Green
Posts: 6
Thanks for the responses so far. I have much to learn and have been reading this and other RV threads to try to learn. At this point, we have delayed buying the trailer.

Does the weight distribution hitch move any of the weight off the truck? I read somewhere that, ideally, the WDH will move about 1/3 of the weight to the axles of the trailer. If so, should I still use all of the tongue weight of the trailer against the payload limit of the truck?

Also, I am pretty sure that the truck could pull the trailer without much of a problem. I am more concerned with the long-term impact of carrying too high a load on the truck.
__________________

cbrown320 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 08:47 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkresge View Post
Dude, the trailer's LOADED weight is far more important than the dry weight. According to Jayco's website, that trailer's GVWR is 8750 pounds. That would include things like propane and all the other stuff we throw into our trailers. Your tongue weight will be 10-15% of that, so call it 13%. That's 1137.5 pounds, which leaves you 584 for payload on the truck, including passengers, cargo, fuel, etc. Sounds like it might be marginal. It might be workable if you don't put much in the trailer - call the tow weight 7000 pounds, now your tongue weight is 910 pounds. You're gonna need a good WDH setup.

Good luck!

Roger
X2 on this post. Never ever use the dry weight as a planning number. You will always be closer to the GVWR of the trailer when you are loaded and ready to camp.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrown320 View Post

Does the weight distribution hitch move any of the weight off the truck? I read somewhere that, ideally, the WDH will move about 1/3 of the weight to the axles of the trailer. If so, should I still use all of the tongue weight of the trailer against the payload limit of the truck?

Also, I am pretty sure that the truck could pull the trailer without much of a problem. I am more concerned with the long-term impact of carrying too high a load on the truck.
No. The purpose of WD is to take weight off the rear of the truck and shift back to the front wheels to restore steering ability.The full weight of the hitch still needs to be counted. Ford has a spec in your owners manual about how much to bring the front end back down when adjusting the WDH. With GM it has to be brought back to stock fender height. Ford I think is a little more forging in the spec.

The issue isn't power. That drive train will tow the trailer just fine. The issue as you are learning is that the other components are limiting what you can do. A good rule of thumb is to focus your search on trailers that are somewhere between 10% and 20% less than you max towing capacity. Then match the specs of trailers you like.
__________________

__________________
Chuck
2013 Jayco Jayfeather X20 E, 2008 GMC Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Z71 SLE
DocBrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 08:53 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,369
Because a properly setup WDH makes the trailer / TV overall more level, some weight is moved to the rear axles of the trailer that would otherwise be sitting on the tongue. Without the WDH you'll have more sag at the rear of the truck, which usually makes the trailer sag at the tongue, (known as squatting) and as a result, more of the trailers weight ends up on the tongue instead of on it's own rear axles. It's not so much that the WDH moves weight off the truck as it is it's simply preventing excess weight from making it to the tongue of the trailer to begin with... if that makes sense.
__________________
2016 27BHS Elite
2012 F-150 EcoBoost / Max Tow (Sale Pending)
2017 F-250 Lariat (Factory Ordered on 4/20)
bansai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 09:20 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Loosenuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Kennesaw
Posts: 161
So what all that boils down to is, yes your truck "Can" pull that trailer.

But, can it safely pull, stop and control that trailer. There you are getting into that "well pretty much, sorta" range.

Are you planning on pulling up and down the mountains? Will you be carrying your own water? Do you like driving with white knuckles? These are all variables you need to decide.

Me personally, I upgraded to a 2500HD because my 1500 was just working too hard yanking the trailer here around the mountains in GA. And there were a couple times I didn't think it would be able to back my trailer up hill into a spot. Remember, it's not just about pulling it down the highway. It's the whole journey!
__________________
Charles King
Kennesaw, GA
My 28RLS Mods and Observations

TT 2016 Jayco 28RLS
TV 2010 Chevy 2500HD 4x4/Z71 aka The Beast
Loosenuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 09:24 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Bowling Green
Posts: 6
With all of the responses I have received, I am reconsidering what I should buy. Now I am trying to determine how much trailer I could pull with a good WDH that would be safe for my truck over the long haul. The Jayco had a dry weight of 6600 pounds and a max weight of 8750.

I have also looked at a Keystone Passport 2890RL. The dry weight on it is 5500 pounds (7200 loaded). I don't know the tongue weight. With what we would plan to haul, I would expect the loaded trailer weight while towing would be around 6500 pounds max. That would make the tongue weight (at 13%) around 845. Our passengers and other cargo will probably be around 900 pounds (including the storage in the front of the camper). Given our truck has a max for cargo and passengers of 1792, I think we would be OK with that.

Please respond and let me know if I am calculating anything wrong. We look forward to getting a new camper but want to make sure we buy one that fits our truck.

Thanks!
cbrown320 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 11:51 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Lancaster
Posts: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrown320 View Post
With all of the responses I have received, I am reconsidering what I should buy. Now I am trying to determine how much trailer I could pull with a good WDH that would be safe for my truck over the long haul. The Jayco had a dry weight of 6600 pounds and a max weight of 8750.

I have also looked at a Keystone Passport 2890RL. The dry weight on it is 5500 pounds (7200 loaded). I don't know the tongue weight. With what we would plan to haul, I would expect the loaded trailer weight while towing would be around 6500 pounds max. That would make the tongue weight (at 13%) around 845. Our passengers and other cargo will probably be around 900 pounds (including the storage in the front of the camper). Given our truck has a max for cargo and passengers of 1792, I think we would be OK with that.

Please respond and let me know if I am calculating anything wrong. We look forward to getting a new camper but want to make sure we buy one that fits our truck.

Thanks!
One last piece of advice from here: Don't do your tow weight planning based on the theoretical towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Instead, do your planning based on the tongue/hitch weight of the trailer and the payload capacity of the tow vehicle.

Roger
__________________

TV 2010 Ford F-150 Supercab
TT 2016 Jay Feather 23RLSW
rkresge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 12:39 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Bobx2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Colorado
Posts: 272
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocBrown View Post
The purpose of WD is to take weight off the rear of the truck and shift back to the front wheels to restore steering ability.The full weight of the hitch still needs to be counted. Ford has a spec in your owners manual about how much to bring the front end back down when adjusting the WDH. With GM it has to be brought back to stock fender height. Ford I think is a little more forging in the spec.
Correct The WD takes no weight off of the truck.
__________________

Becky, Bob and Taylie & Bode
2009 Silverado 2500HD Duramax/Allison
2014 Heartland Sundance XLT 245RL
His and Hers Polaris 570 Touring ATV's
Bobx2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 02:30 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Denver
Posts: 1,369
Partially true. With a properly setup WDH, some of the tongue weight that would be present without one - is actually transferred to the axles of the trailer, which reduces the tongue weight that the TV has to then support. It doesn't 'remove weight' from the truck, but it does in many situations 'remove' weight from the tongue of the trailer... which in turn puts 'less weight' on the truck itself. Since tongue weight is critical in determining how much you can tow (among other things) without exceeding your cargo capacity, this 'transferring' of weight to the trailers axles is basically the same thing as reducing the load on the truck directly. That's my story and I'm sticking with it
__________________
2016 27BHS Elite
2012 F-150 EcoBoost / Max Tow (Sale Pending)
2017 F-250 Lariat (Factory Ordered on 4/20)
bansai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 03:29 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Mid-Mi
Posts: 1,230
320,

If you follow the link in my signature on how a wdh works, that may give a little more info and make it easier to understand.

To sum it up:

TV only: say the fa (front axle) weighs 3000lbs

TV w/ tt hooked up, but without the wd bars latched up: say the fa weighs 2600lbs. So you "lost 400lbs" by hooking the tt up without the wd bars.

TV w/ trailer hooked up and th wd bars latched up: you want the hitch head tilted so that you transfer enough weight back to the fa per you tv owners manual. If it states to restore 100% of the "lost weight", then you want to adjust the wdh head so when the bars are hooked up, the fa weighs 3000lbs again. If it is 50%, then the fa should weigh 2800lbs, 25%- 2700lbs.

When you hook up a trailer and use a wdh, there is some weight that is "transferred" to the tt axles, but the amount is not very much, and it is generally suggested to count the total tw toward the tv payload. The other thing to keep in mind is the tv receiver hitch rating.

I need to weigh our rig again as some things have changed, but here is from the first time I weighed the combo.

Left weights- truck and trailer w/ wd bars hooked up
Middle weights- truck and trailer w/ wd bars unhooked
Right weights- truck only

Top to bottom weights are:
FA
RA
TA
Total weight



You can see that I have restored 100% of the lost weight from the fa. While transferring 540lbs back to the fa, I only transferred 240lbs to the ta. Which with a 1400lb tw, that is not very much weight transferred to the ta.

Hope this helps!!!
__________________
Bubba J- '13 Chevy Silverado 2500HD LT CCSB 4x4 6.0

'16 Jay Flight 32 BHDS ELITE 32 BHDS MODS Reese DC HP

WDH SET UP. HOW A WDH WORKS. CAT SCALE HOW TO.
need-a-vacation is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2016, 07:05 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Bowling Green
Posts: 6
Thanks for the info. Am I right to assume that, at this point, I should be focused primarily on hitch weight instead of the dry weight of the trailer? There is a sticker under my hitch that indicates the tow trailer capacity is 12,200 and my hitch weight capacity is 1220. However, I know those numbers are meaningless because my primary restriction is the 1722 pound payload limit on the truck. I found a trailer that was 1000 pounds lighter than the Jayco (Open Range 2604RL. When I looked up the hitch weight, it was more than the Jayco. Now I am searching for a rear living unit with a tri-fold sofa with a hitch weight under 650.

Any suggestions?
__________________

cbrown320 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.