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View Poll Results: Do you travel with the frig on?
Yes I do travel with the frig on. 382 57.53%
No I do not travel with the frig on. 81 12.20%
I travel with frig on but stop to turn off propane at tunnels 31 4.67%
I travel with frig on but turn off propane while fueling 51 7.68%
I travel with frig on and never turn off propane. 161 24.25%
I`m new at this so I`m on the fence 41 6.17%
Do you travel with your fridge on using AC/Inverter or generator?. 15 2.26%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 664. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-06-2013, 12:43 AM   #21
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We had a 2004'JayFlight 29BHS and we turned on the frig and didn't turn it off until we sold it except when we defrosted it to clean it out. Been through many tunnels never turned it off. Not at gas stations either. The frig had a hard time keeping up as it was. Occasionally we brought a cooler with dry ice if we had too much frozen food to fit in the freezer. Now we have a new Greyhawk and it hasn't been of since we got it. I have thermometers in both the freezer and refrigerator compartments and keep the temp as close to 32 f as I can get it without freezing. It keeps food longer.
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:59 AM   #22
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Fridge ON, always on, never been off.
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:54 AM   #23
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I guess I'll buck the trend here and say that I never travel with the propane on and therefore never have the refer on when on the road. Call me crazy
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Old 09-06-2013, 11:46 AM   #24
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I find it interesting that some people here criticize others for endangering people by not using a Weight Distributing Hitch (for which there are fewer specific related laws and regulations), but openly admit to not following the laws and regulations regarding propane in tunnels and at fuel stations.

As to not having any problems, you can close your eyes and cross back and forth many times on a rural highway and not get hit by a car. That doesn't mean that it is not a dangerous practice. Leaving an open flame device operating in tunnels or at fuel stations is against the law and dangerous. Period. The possible consequences are too great to even consider worth risking.
*********************************
Risk of accidental ignition

A "No Smoking" sign at a gas station

It is prohibited to use open flames and, in some places, mobile phones on the forecourt of a filling station because of the risk of igniting gasoline vapor. In the U.S. the fire marshal is responsible for regulations at the gas pump. Most localities ban smoking, open flames and running engines. Since the increased occurrence of static-related fires many stations have warnings about leaving the refueling point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filling...ental_ignition

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Old 09-06-2013, 12:14 PM   #25
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I have no idea how to get to a fuel pump without running my engine. If it's a two sided pump and someone is filling up on the other side should I stop 10 feet back and push my rig to the pump? I have no idea how to leave a fuel pump without starting up my engine. Am I safe now that "I" am not pumping fuel even if someone else is pumping fuel from the same pump? How do those rules force the fumes from the other side of the pump to obey and stay on thier side????? Now there is good question.

Also, given the height of the "open flame" on my ref and it being 45 feet back from the pump if there were sufficent gas/air density to ignite you would never make it to the pump to begin with, unless you were breathing oxygen from some other source than normal.
Also, if there is sufficent gas/air density for igniton in a tunnel everyone would pass out on the way through it and crash into each other simply because you can't breath that concentration of gas/air and live.

I think this: We should obey laws but we don't have to be confused about how things actually work, you can know things, and we should understand that sometimes we are following a rule that has no actual reason to exist........but follow it we should.
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Old 09-06-2013, 12:26 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldermike View Post
I have no idea how to get to a fuel pump without running my engine. If it's a two sided pump and someone is filling up on the other side should I stop 10 feet back and push my rig to the pump? I have no idea how to leave a fuel pump without starting up my engine. Am I safe now that "I" am not pumping fuel even if someone else is pumping fuel from the same pump? How do those rules force the fumes from the other side of the pump to obey and stay on thier side????? Now there is good question.

Also, given the height of the "open flame" on my ref and it being 45 feet back from the pump if there were sufficent gas/air density to ignite you would never make it to the pump to begin with, unless you were breathing oxygen from some other source than normal.
Also, if there is sufficent gas/air density for igniton in a tunnel everyone would pass out on the way through it and crash into each other simply because you can't breath that concentration of gas/air and live.

I think this: We should obey laws but we don't have to be confused about how things actually work, you can know things, and we should understand that sometimes we are following a rule that has no actual reason to exist........but follow it we should.
Here's the point - it's not about everyday transactions - we all know pumps are safe. It's about public safety during a mishap....(tank overfill, can dumped over, equipment malfunction, car drives onto the lot with a leaking gas tank, vehicle backs into a pump, car drives off with hose attached to the car). NOW...the last thing we need is a spark or flame.
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:05 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Threebutchers View Post
Here's the point - it's not about everyday transactions - we all know pumps are safe. It's about public safety during a mishap....(tank overfill, can dumped over, equipment malfunction, car drives onto the lot with a leaking gas tank, vehicle backs into a pump, car drives off with hose attached to the car). NOW...the last thing we need is a spark or flame.
I am all about safety. But if somone backs into a pump I am starting up and moving away......everyone else can stick around and be "safe". But you are not safe........the pump is electric, that's how the gas gets from the ground and into the tank and that's how it knows your credit card and when to stop pumping. There is no IEC-EX compliant fuel delivery system in the US......for example: to be EX a pump would have to have an internal system to disconnect it's electric service in the event somoene plows it off it's based with a car. The disconnect would need to be proven in all possible senerios.....
We don't have that.

But again, I will follow the rules.......even though NASCAR dumps a ton of gas in 43 running cars in about 13 seconds several times each weekend.

Don't take me wrong I believe in safety......but it's ok to understand the actual danger is already built into the pump.

We do unsafe things every day. Driving comes to the top of the list......if you want to be safe, don't drive. If you want to be safer than you are while driving go hang out at a gas station because you are less likely to be hurt at a gas station than even in your home. There are so many things more unsafe than refueling stations that there is not enough space to write them all down. If you drive, everything else you do is safer.
Gas stations are safe, the miles between them are filled with danger.

But again: obey all rules
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Old 09-06-2013, 01:54 PM   #28
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This always seem to be an on going discussion. I travel with the the LP shut off. I will never have a LP consume my rig while traveling down the highway and that cannot be said about the people who leave the refer running on LP. The refer stays cold for at least 8 hours when not running and the LP closed off.
If anyone one wants to see how dangerous LP can be when not properly used, check on You Tube and type in RV fire. Most all are started in the center of the rig where the LP connections are. There are some you tubes where the rig is brand new! Once a fire starts in a RV stand back, they are impossible to stop.
A former trainer with the Western LP Gas Association.
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Old 09-06-2013, 02:01 PM   #29
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I must weigh in here while rules are rules I think we need to be realistic. To turn off the refrigerator on a TT requires the following procedure:
Stop at the fuel pump
Set the brake
Walk back to the TT
Unlock the TT
Go inside
Turn off the refrigerator
go to the front of the TT
Uncover the propane tanks
note which tank is in use
turn off the tanks
fuel the TV
go back to the propane tanks and turn on the propane
go back into the TT and turn on the refrigerator
verify it is working (frequently it isn't and the lines need to be purged but turning on the stove)
go back to the front verify that the propane bottles are properly covered
drive off
You have to do all of this while you are blocking at least one pump and with my old rig at least two pumps

Similarly with a tunnel you need to pull over on the side of the road and perform the procedure while you are on the side of the road before and after the tunnel. Many tunnels don't have any place to stop so that is dangerous.

Leaving the refrigerator off while traveling works fine for a short while if you are in cloudy weather less than 60F however does not work well if you are in 100F sunny weather. Health department regulations state that if food is over 40F and under 140F for more than a few minutes it must be tossed out due to excessive microbial growth. At some point we need to weigh the various risks.

I used to drive a fuel truck and don't see an issue with a refrigerator in an enclosed compartment with an enclosed flue. It is highly unlikely to get enough concentration of air-fuel mixture to cause a fire. Most service station fires are caused by static discharge. The most common cause: people getting back into their vehicle during the fueling process! To perform the above procedure requires you to enter and exit your vehicle at least twice and the potential for a real problem with static electricity is a greater danger especially since many RVs use synthetic carpet.
There are a lot of regulations written with good intentions by bureaucrats sitting in their ivory towers with no connection to reality.
On ferries where they provide a time and place to turn off the propane and refrigerator or in posted tunnels where they do the same I would turn off the refrigerator otherwise I won't.
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Old 09-06-2013, 02:12 PM   #30
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From the VDOT website pertaining to propane tanks and the Hampton Roads tunnel:

"Hazardous Materials

Before motor homes can go through tunnels, they must stop to have propane tanks checked."


http://www.virginiadot.org/travel/hr...ult.asp#hazmat

And they have flagged down RV`s that fail to stop to be inspected.
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