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Old 06-18-2015, 08:42 AM   #11
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Camper bob, I see you beat me to asking about this concern....

I don't have any experience using dry ice. However, since dry ice is frozen CO2, I wonder about the safety of using dry ice in a closed up RV. This is from the site dryiceinfo.com:
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VENTILATION
Normal air is 78% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and only 0.035% Carbon Dioxide. If the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air rises above 0.5%, carbon dioxide can become dangerous. Smaller concentrations can cause quicker breathing and headaches but is otherwise not harmful. If Dry Ice has been in a closed auto, van, room, or walk-in, for more than 10 minutes, open doors and allow adequate ventilation before entering. Leave area containing Dry Ice if you start to pant and breath quickly develop a headache or your fingernails or lips start to turn blue. This is the sign that you have breathed in too much CO2 and not enough oxygen. Dry Ice CO2 is heavier than air and will accumulate in low spaces. Do not enter closed storage areas that have or have had stored Dry Ice before airing out completely.
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Old 06-18-2015, 10:44 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Camper_bob View Post
I wonder, could the CO2 produced by the dry ice be a cause for concern? There's no one living in a cooler, and typically when you open a cooler, you're outside so the gasses can dissipate quite rapidly. I wonder if when you open your fridge in a small enclosed space like your trailer if there is any risk of trapping those gasses in the living space? Or any harm if they did get trapped?

It's been since I was a teenager that I messed with the stuff, and back then I certainly didn't care about exposure to harmful gasses in an enclosed space! LOL!
CO2 is generally considered "inert" not "toxic". Exposure to CO2 outdoors is no cause for concern. However, a closed-up RV could be 'filled' with CO2 gas from the decaying dry ice that has leaked from the fridge.

Open the RV's door and step back for a minute to let any large quantities of CO2 to rise out (CO2 is slightly less dense than air). Then enter and open windows.

You can fire up the fridge without opening it.

I'd wait to open the fridge until the RV has aired for a few minutes.

Call me paranoid, but I'm still here with all my fingers and toes!
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Old 06-18-2015, 01:52 PM   #13
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As a practical matter it would take a pretty large amount of dry ice to affect the atmosphere in an RV. For one thing RV's just aren't that tightly sealed. Another is that the dry ice changes to gas at a fairly slow rate so it isn't like it is suddenly flooding the interior. You probably get more CO2 from your beer than the dry ice in the fridge.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farming
Dry Ice is roughly $1.00 a pound here in the States. (more or less depending on location.)
1pound of dry ice evaporates (sublimates actually) to 8.7cuft of co2.
1 cu ft of Co2 will increase the levels of a 1,000 cu ft room (10x10x10) by 1,000ppm.
As has been mentioned, you do need to be careful around dry ice. Even wrapped in newspaper the exterior can be cold enough to cause thermal burns. Be especially careful around curious children. It can burn them before they react to pull away.

We use the frozen meats, frozen water bottles, etc. method to help. Back when I worked in a research lab and had access to dry ice I tried using it camping a few times. I found we froze a few things we didn't want to freeze because it was sometimes difficult to keep things far enough away. It can be used, but research safe use a bit before jumping in. Extreme cold thermal burns are nasty.

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Old 06-18-2015, 02:26 PM   #14
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"sublimates"


Can I edit my previous post? "decaying", sheesh!


According to some quick research (https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/chemic...bondioxide.htm) 1,000 PPM of CO2 is considered "a potential problem".


But, as has been mentioned, RV's aren't exactly Tupperware.


I still stand by giving the place a minute to air out.
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Old 06-19-2015, 10:30 PM   #15
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Wouldn't the installed CO2 detector go off if the concentration of CO2 from dry ice gets to the danger level?
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Old 06-19-2015, 10:47 PM   #16
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Wouldn't the installed CO2 detector go off if the concentration of CO2 from dry ice gets to the danger level?
The detector is for CO (carbon monoxide), not CO2. The gas from the dry ice wouldn't affect it.
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