Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×
Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-06-2024, 01:03 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Ann-Marie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2022
Location: Beaufort
Posts: 205
OK to lower tire pressure for smoother ride?

My sticker says 80 psi in rear wheels and 70 in front.
Is it OK to use 70 and 60 to cut out some of the jitters?
It sure does run nicer and I haven't noticed any short term change in mpg.
I always feel tire temperature at stops and they didn't feel any warmer.
__________________
Ann-Marie Foster

2019 Jayco Greyhawk 30
2017 Ford Fusion Hybrid.
Ann-Marie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2024, 01:08 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Grumpy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Where ever the boss says we're going.
Posts: 16,284
Go to a CAT scale then adjust accordingly...

https://rvsafety.com/images/pdf/mich...ionrvtruck.pdf
__________________
DISNEY LOVERS
Grumpy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2024, 01:12 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
craigav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: North Texas
Posts: 3,704
I would suspect that the consensus opinion would be not to do so. However, if you were to weigh your RV and determine the weight load on the tires, then you may could lower the pressures if you are running a lower weight than what the sticker is based on. Many tire manufactures have tire pressure charts that you can use once you know the weight on the tires. Being you have a Class C, I suspect the load will not be lighter than anticipated and instead the weight will be heavier. ~CA
__________________
2010 GreyHawk 31SS
craigav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2024, 01:45 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 172
Running lower pressure could put undue stress on your tires and cause a blowout, which could lead to a catastrophic event. I agree with the others on here about having your rig weighed, before altering tire pressure and only do so based on manufacturer’s recommendations.
tnka trk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2024, 04:52 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Cambridge
Posts: 96
Fronts I would never change as the weight on that axle tends to be the most consistent. The only time it'll change is when you are loaded and it will only slightly change. Now the rear can be decreased for a better ride, specially if you are unloaded and very little weight back there. Only issue with doing that is if you get caught with the low pressure and need to tow or haul something then you are putting the tires and yourself at risk. So the little bit of a rough rid at max pressure means you are never caught in a situation like that or scrambling to find a place to air up the tires.
mavrick0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2024, 05:16 PM   #6
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,968
What Grumpy said and then if you decided to lower them I would watch temps and tread wear.



In all of these tire pressure threads on here one thing that keeps coming up is weight and heat. If you are not seeing heat, cupping or edge of the tire wear you should be ok. But, gain if you are full weight don't.
__________________
2018 Greyhawk 29MVP-Sold
2023 Jeep Gladiator Mojave

CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2024, 05:42 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
RogerR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Mapleton
Posts: 4,412
I saw yours was a 2019. Have the tires been replaced? If they have then with the front and rear axle weights find the manufacturers recommended pressure for that weight.
Mine is a small RV and original suggested pressure was 50 PSI for C rated tires. I upgraded to D rated and a larger size. As a result the pressure that worked best was neither the sidewall max of 65 or the original (based on a c rated tire) 50 lbs but a 55PSI off the Goodyear chart.
__________________
2017 SLX 195RB
2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit L 5.7L V8
Andersen WDH hitch, Renogy 100 AH Lithium &
200 Watts solar panels from Renogy

Prev. '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland, gas 3.6 V6
RogerR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2024, 03:58 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Berkel-Enschot
Posts: 94
Only after weighing fully loaded, also the persons and water, etc.
Then per axle or better per axle-end.

Then give all the data of tires and motorhome, and I will calculate a cold presdure with maximum reserve, at wich comfort and gripp is still acceptable.

Mayby its enaugh to only lower the front, because driver and eventual co-driver are mostly seated close to front axle.
Front axle is for a singleload rear axle often much less weight on then rear.
For dualload rear axle, often front higher pressure needed then rear, so other way around.
But you gave 80 rear and 70 front, so I suspect single load rear axle ( 2 tires on the axle, not 4).

But again, only after weighing and calculating.
Weights and division over the axles(ends) is often yudged to low, and then change on overheated tires.

When pressure us right aproximately 15% to 20% of free flexible sidewall is deflected, but also this is a dangerous statement.

You can simply measure the deflection, and free flexible part is section hight ( can be calculated) minus 1 inch for the part in rimm and treat-thicknes.
jadatis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2024, 07:26 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: Columbus
Posts: 142
I'm firmly in the NO camp about lowering tire pressure.

If you want to help the "jitters", look into the suspension. After a thorough checkover making sure no loose bolts or trashed bushings you can think about upgrades. From what I've read, the whole suspension on most rigs is about a step better than a horse-cart. The tires are probably the best part of it. New shocks will probably be the biggest bang for the buck (as they're super easy for the manufacturer to cheap out on).
__________________
-Russell
"You don't get to judge me for how I fix what you break."
2018 Eagle HT 28.5 RSTS/2004 Chevy 2500HD 6.0 MANUAL
Russc25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2024, 09:20 AM   #10
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Russc25 View Post
I'm firmly in the NO camp about lowering tire pressure.

If you want to help the "jitters", look into the suspension. After a thorough checkover making sure no loose bolts or trashed bushings you can think about upgrades. From what I've read, the whole suspension on most rigs is about a step better than a horse-cart. The tires are probably the best part of it. New shocks will probably be the biggest bang for the buck (as they're super easy for the manufacturer to cheap out on).



I understand your concern but her rig is a class C, as was mine and there is a difference in tires and suspension over pulled units. There are many threads here on suspension upgrades for the Cs especially. JFYI
__________________
2018 Greyhawk 29MVP-Sold
2023 Jeep Gladiator Mojave

CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2024, 09:58 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2021
Location: belleville
Posts: 56
Have the unit weighed, then look up the tire manufacturer's weight/pressure chart for your tires. Set the pressure according to the chart. I wouldn't go too far below the pressure the chart recommends.
johnsat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2024, 04:26 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Berkel-Enschot
Posts: 94
Reaction to post #11.

You write:
I wouldn't go too far below the pressure the chart recommends.

I would certainly not go lower then with list determined pressure.
So think your statement dangerous

Even higher is minimaly needed to give reserve for things like:
Unequall load R/L on the axle.
Inacurate reading of pressure
Etcetera.
jadatis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2024, 11:53 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Livingston
Posts: 120
No. Ask any lawyer.
__________________
2019 28.5RSTS - Built on a Friday afternoon.
2017 F250 Lariat 6.2L 4WD 6 3/4 ft bed
Aggie79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2024, 12:12 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2024
Location: CROSSVILLE
Posts: 48
If your using a TPMS system check the temperature before and after a longish ride. If it does not increase, between the two pai changes. I see no issues. I did lower my front on the class C with no problems and I was only a couple hundred pounds from weight limits.
__________________
2024 Jayco Swift 20T
schielc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 06:13 AM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2023
Location: Camano Island
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jadatis View Post
Only after weighing fully loaded, also the persons and water, etc.
Then per axle or better per axle-end.

Then give all the data of tires and motorhome, and I will calculate a cold presdure with maximum reserve, at wich comfort and gripp is still acceptable.

Mayby its enaugh to only lower the front, because driver and eventual co-driver are mostly seated close to front axle.
Front axle is for a singleload rear axle often much less weight on then rear.
For dualload rear axle, often front higher pressure needed then rear, so other way around.
But you gave 80 rear and 70 front, so I suspect single load rear axle ( 2 tires on the axle, not 4).


But again, only after weighing and calculating.
Weights and division over the axles(ends) is often yudged to low, and then change on overheated tires.

When pressure us right aproximately 15% to 20% of free flexible sidewall is deflected, but also this is a dangerous statement.

You can simply measure the deflection, and free flexible part is section hight ( can be calculated) minus 1 inch for the part in rimm and treat-thicknes.
.......
Most often dual tire axles, e.g. rear axles have enough more weight than the front axle so the rear tires need higher pressure. Check your vehicle sticker!
thudbranch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 03:30 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Berkel-Enschot
Posts: 94
@ post 15.
Yes Drive/rear axle in dualload, so 4 tires on the axle, has more weight on axle then front, but devided over 4 tires instead of 2.
You often see in that case, 120 psi front, and 80 to 90 psi on rear/drive.

Single load rear axle also more weight on then front, but also devided over 2 tires. so needs then higher pressure.
Then often weightdivision about F 40%/R 60%

Once read advice, to always keep more then 30% on front axle, for riding quality.
jadatis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 04:00 PM   #17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2023
Location: Camano Island
Posts: 12
Note this was about a Class C rig. Also in any dual tire rig (whether Tandem Axle or not) the load ratings of each tire is significantly reduced due to more heat build up with the tires' adjacent side walls not getting a full air flow. As a starting point I would go by the vehicle sticker and then adjust down only after confirming the full loaded axle weight loads.
thudbranch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 06:58 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2021
Location: Troy
Posts: 1,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann-Marie View Post
My sticker says 80 psi in rear wheels and 70 in front.
Is it OK to use 70 and 60 to cut out some of the jitters?
It sure does run nicer and I haven't noticed any short term change in mpg.
I always feel tire temperature at stops and they didn't feel any warmer.
If you are not at the max CCC of your RV, then some pressure reduction could be justified and correct. So, as others have said, weigh your vehicle and get the chart from your tire manufacturer for those tires. Without doing that, you are just going by gut feeling. You may be right in lowering them, but you can’t show justification.
Kevin Cooper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2024, 06:34 AM   #19
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2024
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 1
Lower tire pressure

I am fairly new to this community. Had my class A RV two years. Would fuel milage, and tire wear be something to consider. Not that we get fantastic fuel milage. I also have been told to replace tires every five years. I know tire pressure effects both milage, and wear on a passenger vehicle. I would also like to improve ride comfort. I have to admit when my wife drives the ride is a little more comfortable. She does stay below 65mph. We are not in any hurry to get any where
WoodElf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2024, 12:19 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: Columbus
Posts: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAG View Post
I understand your concern but her rig is a class C, as was mine and there is a difference in tires and suspension over pulled units. There are many threads here on suspension upgrades for the Cs especially. JFYI
Yep, I mean powered units especially (A, B, and C). Cutting corners on suspension is an age old tradition of vehicle makers. My background and some of my education is automotive tech. real world example: I previously had a nissan frontier base model. The base models came with different shocks than the other trims and they were junk from the factory. My daughter got motion sickness several times in that truck before I got rid of it for other reasons, as with other vehicles of mine with bad shocks/struts. I can tell from a quick drive if they're bad and I've become a bit of a snob about them. Anyway, back to campers, why would they put decent parts on when they can say "that's just how campers are but for a fee we can put something better" about stuff that shoulda been on in the first place, hence all those threads about suspension upgrades Kinda like people saying Glocks are so great because of all the aftermarket. Sorry, no if you need that much aftermarket to make it good, it's not so great to start with.
__________________
-Russell
"You don't get to judge me for how I fix what you break."
2018 Eagle HT 28.5 RSTS/2004 Chevy 2500HD 6.0 MANUAL
Russc25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Jayco, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.