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Old 02-22-2011, 09:44 PM   #11
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We traded a 17' Casita for our 23' Jay Flight G2. One thing we miss is the 12V/110/Propane frig.

Our TV alternator was more than sufficient to run the frig 12V while towing.

I don't like towing with the propane on for a number of reasons not the least of which it is illegal in some states to say nothing of the odd bridges, tunnels, and ferries, and gas stations.

Has anyone built a mod using a properly sized inverter, proper wiring, and switching components so that the Jayco frig can run on 110V while towing?

I'm thinking of wiring two additional 110v input sources, generator and inverter, in such a way that one one can be "plugged in" at a time.

Regards,
Jim
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Old 02-22-2011, 09:53 PM   #12
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My old 76 Dodge Jamboree had a 1200w inverter I installed and it was big enough to power the refridgerator on 12V power as long as the engine was going other than that it would wipe out the house battery rather quickly...

So the idea is solid and does work just remember to cut the refrig back to propane or 110 VAC when you stop some where.
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Old 02-22-2011, 09:58 PM   #13
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I did a little research on the inverter running the fridge deal. From what i found the fridge pulls ~350 watts which would take a decent size inverter. The inverter would take about 35 amps DC to run. From what i found the TV will supply ~30 AMPS DC to the trailer so your house battery will have to make up the ~5 AMP difference the other option would be to have the inverter in the TV and run AC cord to the trailer. Seems too complicated for the little propane it takes to run the fridge going down the highway (assuming it is legal where you are).
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Old 02-22-2011, 10:02 PM   #14
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Ahhh... You caught me there... I didn't think about the charge amperage and the limit of charging from the trailer plug... (D'Oh!)
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Old 02-22-2011, 10:03 PM   #15
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The heating element in most of the Norcolds are rated at 300 watts, so you could theoretically do it with an inverter. It would pull 25 amps while operating.

My thoughts are you would be really pushing it unless you have a good set of batteries. I know my alternator never sends anywhere near that back to the TT -- I think I get 7 or 8 amps so eventually I would not be able to keep up.
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Old 02-22-2011, 10:11 PM   #16
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Anyone thought of putting the inverter in your TV and running an AC cord to the trailer? Would this be possible?
I know my truck has 2 alternators @ 130AMP each so i could run my 1200 watt inverter with no problem.
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Old 02-22-2011, 10:17 PM   #17
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There is more to the plan.

The inverter is mounted close to the battery with an old style Ford battery relay so that the inverter is off if the engine isn't running.

BTW, I am installing the same device on the trailer charge line so that I don't accidentally discharge the TV battery when leaving the trailer hooked up. Ford and Toyota, I believe, are the only manufacturers who switch the trailer charge line in there towing packages. I know Chrysler doesn't (anyone what to guess how I found out?)

Back to the frig, then I would run either #6 or #8 110V wiring in flex conduit back along the frame rails to a marine type connector set at the hitch.

But I must admit this is last on the list to things to do. First is where to mount the Honda generator. Front storage on driver side looks like a candidate. To heavy for the tongue, I think.

Regards,
Jim
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:48 PM   #18
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The 3-way reefer I had in my previous Hi-Lo trailer had separate heating elements for 12v DC at 125 watts (10 amps at 12.5 volts) and for 120v AC at 250 watts (2+ amps at 120 volts). I believe the difference was to conserve DC power while operating on 12 volts, which was usually while driving, during which the reefer door was rarely, if ever, opened.

As soon as we stopped for more than a quick meal, we switched the reefer to either AC (with shore power) or propane if no power and we raised the roof. The Hi-Lo trailer was not designed to run the reefer on propane when the roof was lowered, so the 12 volt DC operation was mandatory for driving.

Looking at the service manual for my current 2-way Norcold reefer, it looks like the DC heating element could be added easily but I am not sure if the control board would be smart enough to detect it and then allow 3-way operation.

If an inverter was located on the TV to run the reefer on AC power, the maximum AC ampere draw would be less than 5 amps for sure. That would certainly not require 6 or 8 gauge wire from the TV to trailer, 14 gauge is good for up to 15 amps. Of course, heavy gauge wire would be needed to connect the inverter to the TV battery.
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Old 04-24-2011, 09:05 AM   #19
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I don't know if this makes any difference but I bought an old bronco ( 1st series) that had a 120v duplex outlet mounted on the trucks alternater, ie the guy( an elec engr) figured out how to get 120ac out of a 12v dc source .I guess 120v dc is probably doable but I have no idea how he converted to ac or the amperage that was available. (at least that's what it looked like). Any minds out there starting to go wild. Just think get 120v ac from your tv & back feed your 120v outlets, run the fridge whenever.
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Old 04-24-2011, 02:44 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 19H F250 View Post
I don't know if this makes any difference but I bought an old bronco ( 1st series) that had a 120v duplex outlet mounted on the trucks alternater, ie the guy( an elec engr) figured out how to get 120ac out of a 12v dc source .I guess 120v dc is probably doable but I have no idea how he converted to ac or the amperage that was available. (at least that's what it looked like). Any minds out there starting to go wild. Just think get 120v ac from your tv & back feed your 120v outlets, run the fridge whenever.
That was an old mod. One had to modify the alternator so the AC generated by the Alternator is tapped off before it goes through the diodes (mostly to avoid cooking them), then run the alternator with an unregulated field (some people did manage to come up with high voltage regulators). AC quality was lousy, though. Voltage regulation was a hit or miss (mostly miss) proposition achieved by regulating engine speed. The voltage would change every time the load did and the engine speed would have to be readjusted. I doubt the modern alternators would allow this. Running a 12v to 120v inverter off the 12v dc output of the alternator would be easier and safer.
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