Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×
Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-05-2022, 11:35 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Toad Suck
Posts: 63
scorpions

Heading SW for awhile and camping off grid.
Question?
Any thoughts about ways to keep scorpions, diamond back rattlers and black widows away and out of RV snd camp spot while camping?
More concerned about pet travelling with me.
Thanks
Toad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 12:01 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
ARoamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: St Johns MI
Posts: 1,204
Go when they are hibernating and not very active, generally December through early March depending on temps and area.
Don't let your pets wander unattended.
__________________
2020 Pinnacle 32rlts
640 watts solar, 300AH lithium
2020 High Country Duramax 3500
TS3 Hitch
Ms says I'm full of useless knowledge and other stuff...
ARoamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 12:06 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Toad Suck
Posts: 63
unfortunately

Unfortunately our travels will take us through the SW mid May "start of heat season and triple digit temperatures". We will be staying a couple week's. Tombstone,



Quote:
Originally Posted by ARoamer View Post
Go when they are hibernating and not very active, generally December through early March depending on temps and area.
Don't let your pets wander unattended.
Toad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 12:59 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
cbeers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Perryton
Posts: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toad View Post
Heading SW for awhile and camping off grid.
Question?
Any thoughts about ways to keep scorpions, diamond back rattlers and black widows away and out of RV snd camp spot while camping?
More concerned about pet travelling with me.
Thanks
Try looking in repellants you can scatter around perimeter that will keep snakes and insects away or liquids to spray if you have the water and a pump up sprayer
Bonide is one and liquid fence may be another. Good luck.
__________________
2019 F250 Superduty Powerstroke Diesel
2020 Jayco Jay Flight 34rsbs
Anderson WDH 14k
Wineguard G3 portable sat system & H24 receiver
2013 Harley Triglide
2 Yorkies
cbeers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 03:16 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Manchester
Posts: 96
Toad,
Lived & camped in the desert for a long time (since stationed in the Mohave desert in '83). We also camp with our dogs in the desert all the time. I can tell you LOTs of things to look out for. But to keep to your original question, here are a few basics:
Like anywhere else, the insects / animals will go to the food source. Scorpions eat the bugs; snakes eat the small rodents; spiders, the other small bugs. Keep your area clean (don't leave food / food scraps out or on the ground around your camp) to attract them. Keeping the area clean & neat will keep most of your pest away for the time of camping. The snakes generally do not like being around people & will generally stay away from you, unless the main food source is there (like rodents eating your food dropping's).
Keep the dogs on a leash, take notice if they alert on something. Our dogs will alert, but stay about a foot away, if a scorpion gets into the house. Speaking of that, I have not seen a scorpion climb up into a camper, I guess maybe up a loading ramp if down for a LONG time. They like dark areas & generally come out at night. Keep a black light style flashlight near when outside at night & you can spot them if they are around. They will light up under the black light. When picking up items that have been sitting outside, always either wear gloves, or check items all around before picking up, especially the bottom sides. Check & ensure completely clean before bringing into the camper.
We also found when camping in the desert & hiking with the dogs, it was best to put the dog "booties" on their paws. This is due to the sharp rocks & thorns you might come across. We put them on before heading out with them & take them off before they go back into the camper.

Tombstone area is a nice place to visit. Make sure you check out Bisbee & Lowell while there (eat breakfast at the Bisbee breakfast club, then walk the street at Lowell to walk off the breakfast). Note that wait times at the breakfast club can be long depending on day & time. You could also do the mine tour while it is still running. I heard they might be ending them due to the built up exposure levels the guides are getting. Try the Killer be honey in Bisbee while walking the streets there.

Have fun & enjoy your trip! Yes, that time of the year will be warm during the day (not summer heat yet) but that area (being open & higher elevation) will cool down at night & camp fires are nice then.
AZMarine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 05:30 PM   #6
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,153
Even the local pest control people tell you that there is little to nothing that you can put out that kills scorpions. They are a fact of life for we desert dwellers and since I live on the edge of the desert we get more than a few in the house. They can slip in under doors in openings as thin as a dime. Their favorite prey are crickets so eliminate the crickets and fewer scorpions.



The bark scorpion is the biggest threat for poison and they are the smallest. The others are not a major threat. Likely a sting from the bark scorpion will do little more than cause some pain and numb lips and face. Poison control will tell you to watch the patient for more severe signs and if nothing else happens it is over in a day or so.



In 50+ years of hiking, camping and hunting in the desert here I have seen a few rattlers. They will try to get away from you just as fast as you want to get away from them. There are training schools for dogs and snakes. Avoiding snakes is just being aware but the chances you will run into one are slim.



Black widows don't just walk in and bite you. They show up in undisturbed areas. You can tell a Black widow web because it will be very tough. The only time you will probably see them is at night and if you have been camping in the same place long enough for them to set up camp with you.



Bottom line is worrying about them is all to do about nothing.
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_0662.jpg  
__________________
2018 Jayco Greyhawk 29MVP
2019 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
2011 Cyclone 3010 Toy Hauler- Sold
2014 Chevy Silverado Duramax LML -Sold
CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 05:47 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Route 66 Traveler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Kingman, AZ
Posts: 1,519
If you are worried about your dog(s) and rattlesnakes, look up a snake avoidance class. Every dog we have ever owned has gone through a class. Twice our Yellow Lab saved us from getting too close to a Western Diamond. Well worth the money.

A handheld Blacklight will illuminate scorpions at night. They light up a bluish green color and are very easy to see. If tent camping always shake out your boots & shoes before putting them on.
__________________
Lee & Kathy, and our alarm clock Jake!
2017 Starcraft Autumn Ridge 266RKS 50 amp.
2017 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 4x4, 10-1-2021
2007 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab (Traded)

Route 66 Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 05:47 PM   #8
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,153
That snake, BTW, is on a back road near some old mining ghost towns near Tombstone.
__________________
2018 Jayco Greyhawk 29MVP
2019 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
2011 Cyclone 3010 Toy Hauler- Sold
2014 Chevy Silverado Duramax LML -Sold
CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 05:52 PM   #9
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Route 66 Traveler View Post
If you are worried about your dog(s) and rattlesnakes, look up a snake avoidance class. Every dog we have ever owned has gone through a class. Twice our Yellow Lab saved us from getting too close to a Western Diamond. Well worth the money.

A handheld Blacklight will illuminate scorpions at night. They light up a bluish green color and are very easy to see. If tent camping always shake out your boots & shoes before putting them on.

Cowboys used to hang their boots above ground to keep scorpions from crawling in. I have never seen or heard of anyone who had that happen and we sleep in cots in the open during quail season camp while in the open desert. Not that it would not happen but just saying. And Johnny Ringo, who was found shot and leaning against a tree some miles out of Tombstone had his boots hanging on his saddle horn of his saddled horse.
__________________
2018 Jayco Greyhawk 29MVP
2019 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
2011 Cyclone 3010 Toy Hauler- Sold
2014 Chevy Silverado Duramax LML -Sold
CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 06:03 PM   #10
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,153
My backyard rabbit control.
Attached Thumbnails
View recent photos.png  
__________________
2018 Jayco Greyhawk 29MVP
2019 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
2011 Cyclone 3010 Toy Hauler- Sold
2014 Chevy Silverado Duramax LML -Sold
CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 06:11 PM   #11
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toad View Post
Unfortunately our travels will take us through the SW mid May "start of heat season and triple digit temperatures". We will be staying a couple week's. Tombstone,

While you might find triple digits in May it is more likely that they will be low 100's and our dry heat. Mid June will be much hotter and then not be so dry as the Monsoon moves in. 115+ is not unusual in June and once the humidity hits the temps will drop back into the 105 range but with humidity. In May the night times will be cool and especially in the high deserts near Tombstone.



Tombstone and SE AZ will get the first Monsoon storms as the moisture moves up out of Mexico. Hence, the Monsoon. A change in wind currents that brings moisture from a different direction.



If you want information on what to do and where to stay in that area PM me. We spend a good part of the year during different seasons in SE AZ. It probably is the best kept secret (though not so much anymore) about AZ.
__________________
2018 Jayco Greyhawk 29MVP
2019 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
2011 Cyclone 3010 Toy Hauler- Sold
2014 Chevy Silverado Duramax LML -Sold
CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 06:17 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Route 66 Traveler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Kingman, AZ
Posts: 1,519
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAG View Post
In 50+ years of hiking, camping and hunting in the desert here I have seen a few rattlers. They will try to get away from you just as fast as you want to get away from them. There are training schools for dogs and snakes. Avoiding snakes is just being aware but the chances you will run into one are slim.
A few years ago we were ATV’ing in the Quartzsite area after a Monsoon rain storm. We counted 22 rattlers in one hour. Western Diamondbacks are basically timid and will always try to get away. Sidewinders will bury themselves in soft sand and can be very aggressive when disturbed…will actually move towards you instead of going the other way.
__________________
Lee & Kathy, and our alarm clock Jake!
2017 Starcraft Autumn Ridge 266RKS 50 amp.
2017 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 4x4, 10-1-2021
2007 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab (Traded)

Route 66 Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 06:56 PM   #13
CAG
Senior Member
 
CAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 3,153
Quote:
Sidewinders will bury themselves in soft sand and can be very aggressive when disturbed…will actually move towards you instead of going the other way.
That is true with sidewinder vipers in Africa and the Sahara but most here do not live in sandy areas. Some in the sand dunes around Yuma may but in fact much of the SW desert is Hard-pan and Calichi which nothing digs down into, including my yard plants.
__________________
2018 Jayco Greyhawk 29MVP
2019 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
2011 Cyclone 3010 Toy Hauler- Sold
2014 Chevy Silverado Duramax LML -Sold
CAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 07:10 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Route 66 Traveler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Kingman, AZ
Posts: 1,519
There are hundreds of washes in AZ, and most all have a soft, sandy bed, especially after rains. Thatís where we do most of metal detecting. Soft sand is where a lot of the gold will end up, plus itís easier digging, and so do Sidewinders.

We moved from Quartzsite to Kingman 9 years ago where the ground is not as sandy or soft as it was in Quartzsite and havenít seen one Sidewinder. We have seen the Mohave Green rattlesnakes and are very dangerous compared to the Western Diamondback because their venom will attack the central nervous system. It is very important if you are ever bitten by a snake to know exactly what kind of a snake it was because the anti-venom for one type wonít work for the other. If possible take a photo, or kill the snake and take it with you in a sealed container so that it can be identified by medical personnel.
__________________
Lee & Kathy, and our alarm clock Jake!
2017 Starcraft Autumn Ridge 266RKS 50 amp.
2017 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 4x4, 10-1-2021
2007 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab (Traded)

Route 66 Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 08:13 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
ARoamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: St Johns MI
Posts: 1,204
[QUOTE=Route 66 Traveler;1032859 is very important if you are ever bitten by a snake to know exactly what kind of a snake it was because the anti-venom for one type wonít work for the other. If possible take a photo, or kill the snake and take it with you in a sealed container so that it can be identified by medical personnel.[/QUOTE]


Are you sure of the anti venom being snake specific? I just went to a snake seminar and the presenter stated that there is only one type of anti venom for native snakes in the US and it works on all. Quite pricey, IIRC, around $1000 per dose and some may need 10 or more doses depending on bite severity and the individuals reaction. He did also state that if you're bitten by an imported snake you may be out of luck because anti venom for those isn't readily available.
ARoamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 08:46 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Route 66 Traveler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Kingman, AZ
Posts: 1,519
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARoamer View Post
Are you sure of the anti venom being snake specific
Years ago there was a TV showed filmed at Loma Linda University Hospital where the topic was surviving snake bites. That’s where I remember seeing that it was important to identify the snake. In one show some intelligent person brought in the snake that had bitten his son into the hospital in a gunnysack…still alive and not too happy.

So your question is valid and worth pursuing…and you could be right. I have a friend who works at our local hospital in the ER…next time I see him I’ll ask him.
__________________
Lee & Kathy, and our alarm clock Jake!
2017 Starcraft Autumn Ridge 266RKS 50 amp.
2017 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 4x4, 10-1-2021
2007 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab (Traded)

Route 66 Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2022, 09:39 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
us71na's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: McKean, PA
Posts: 1,013
Snakes and scorpions are mostly active at night. Rattle snakes are going to be in shady places during the day as will scorpions. Black Widow spiders will build webs in shady areas as well. Keep your pets on a leash an attended at all times when outside and you shouldn't have any problems. Don't go walking through the brush or rocky areas with your pets. Use a flashlight to scan the area where you are about to walk at night. Remember under your camper will be a shady area as the sun comes up.
__________________
2011 Skylark 21FKV
us71na is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2022, 07:44 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
kirkelli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: ridgecrest
Posts: 1,026
We camp in the Sierra Foothills quite often and during the summer months someone encounters Diamond Backs and or Mojave Greens. Diamond backs like to curl up next to cool ice chest so we always keep our eyes out. Mojave Greens tend to stay away from people. We have encountered them a couple of times and they are very aggressive. They will hold their ground and will actually chase you away.. If you encounter a Mojave Green, do nothing but get everyone and pets away from them.. Their bites are deadly and can take a life within 20 mins of a bite. We don't see many scorpions but in some areas of the Sierras, we see tons of Tarantulas in the evening hours.. Red Fire ants are also prominent in some parts of the Sierras. I've actually been stung between my index finger and the sting was very painful, worse than a bee sting. Never seen black widows camping but have seen plenty around my home in the wood pile.
kirkelli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2022, 08:52 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Route 66 Traveler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Kingman, AZ
Posts: 1,519
Here are two photos. The first is a Western Diamondback, also called a Coontail rattlesnake that we past while my daughter was water skiing in Lake Havasu in Arizona. It was about 200 yards off shore. When we stated harassing it the snake made a bee-line for the shore. It surprised us all on how fast it could swim. Later in the day we found a park Ranger and I asked him if he'd ever seen rattlesnakes swimming in the lake. He said "No", but had heard stories of them doing that. My daughter didn't ski again that day!


The second is a track from a Sidewinder we found while on an ATV trail in Quartzsite, AZ. It's one of the biggest I have ever seen. We followed it where it went off trail into some bushes...didn't pursue further!
Attached Thumbnails
Havasu Rattlesnake.jpg   Sidewinder 4.jpg  
__________________
Lee & Kathy, and our alarm clock Jake!
2017 Starcraft Autumn Ridge 266RKS 50 amp.
2017 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 4x4, 10-1-2021
2007 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab (Traded)

Route 66 Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2022, 09:07 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
kirkelli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: ridgecrest
Posts: 1,026
The first month i moved to Sacramento back in Sept 1990, i remember reading a story in the Sac Bee about a female water skier in Folsom Lake. She was water-skiing and fell while avoiding a floating tree log. She was within a few feet from the log and swam over to hang to it while the tow boat circled around to pick her up. She was bitten five times by a small den of rattle snakes on her face neck and upper shoulders. Her father who jumped in to rescue her was also bitten. The girl died a few hours after the bites, her father survived. I'm an avid water skier and have since told everyone we ski with to stay away from any floating depress in the water.
kirkelli is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Jayco, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.