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Old 09-25-2015, 12:19 PM   #11
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As they say - it's all a matter of taste and lifestyle. DH and I agree we could FT in our TT ... so long as we got outside and did adventures (you can go stir-crazy as easily in your stick-and-brick as you could in a RV). When travelling with children - there are two schools of thought ... [1] let the parents drive the agenda or [2] let the kids drive the agenda; for us it was #1 and our son easily adapted! Just make sure you determine how long you can drive before your child needs a potty-break, exercise/fresh-air, and an adventure-along-the-way!
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:34 PM   #12
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Yes, for sure! We don't want to drive too long at a time for her sake, but we want to see a lot and take our time doing it. She'll still be in diapers for a while so she pretty much will have to go with the flow! We are city people presently, but are very active, and she loves nothing more to be outside taking in sights and sounds. As far as we're concerned the TT is a place to eat and sleep....and to close the gap to our next abode on the West Coast. We hope not to spend TOO many rainy days inside!
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:45 PM   #13
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Be careful taking the "it can tow 10,000 lbs" advertising line because I fell for it as well when I bought my Ram 1500 last year. We had originally planned on buying a 28BHBE this year then I stumbled over the payload limitations on the 1/2 ton. My trucks GVWR (basically the maximum weight that should be on the tires/suspension) is 6,900 lbs. I have a few options on the truck (ie. tonneau cover, side steps, etc) that all add weight and reduce my available payload. To be safe, I went to the CAT scales and weighed the truck empty except for me, the kids car seats, and a full tank of gas - came out to 6,000 lbs. That means that I have 900 lbs capacity to add my wife, kids, weight distribution hitch head, and the tongue weight of the trailer, plus any other cargo in the truck before hitting the engineers recommended maximum. Sure the engine and the brakes can pull and stop 10,000 lbs (horizontal stresses), but the frame, suspension, and the tires can only handle 6,900 lbs (vertical stress).

Long story short, we bought a 26BH because it is about 180 lbs lighter on the tongue weight than the 28BHBE.

Lots of people will say that you will be fine exceeding the GVWR and not to worry about it, but there will also be other people that tell you to hit the scales and stay within your limits - your decision to make.
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TT - 2017 Jay Flight 32DSBH
TV - 2017 F150 w/HDPP (Payload = 2,241 lbs; FAWR = 3,750 lbs; RAWR = 4,800 lbs)
Previous - 2011 Jay Series 1007 (traded); 2016 Jay Flight 26BH (traded)
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:51 PM   #14
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Thanks Tommy. We essentially made the same mistake with the Durango. 😳 Which is why we went with the Ram. My husband crunched all the numbers exhaustively so Im trusting his math, but I know we don't have any extras on the truck and we're planning on towing 1000lbs under to be safe. I do know that there are so many models of the Ram and their capacities all vary. My husband called dodge to be sure. I'll pass along what you said though to make sure the tongue weight isn't an issue. Thanks!
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Old 09-25-2015, 01:02 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Blipe27 View Post
Thanks Tommy. We essentially made the same mistake with the Durango. 😳 Which is why we went with the Ram. My husband crunched all the numbers exhaustively so Im trusting his math, but I know we don't have any extras on the truck and we're planning on towing 1000lbs under to be safe. I do know that there are so many models of the Ram and their capacities all vary. My husband called dodge to be sure. I'll pass along what you said though to make sure the tongue weight isn't an issue. Thanks!
Check the sticker on the driver side door of the truck, that will tell you the actual payload. Then drive over to the nearest CAT scale and get the actual weight of the truck without a trailer (with everyone in the truck when it's weighed).

That will give you an idea of how much payload you have to work with.

Most people around here will tell you that the dry weight listed on the trailer is... well... understated to say the least. Best calculation is to take the GVWR of the trailer and use 12-15% of that value to calculate your actual tongue weight. It will be significantly higher than the manufacturer's listed dry tongue weight.

I towed a 6000 lb TT with my old Ford Expedition across the country the other year. I was completely within specs on paper. But once I weighed the entire setup, we were way over payload on the vehicle, and the driving experience was do-able, but far from relaxing.

The truck you see in my sig was my solution after the Expedition broke down in New Mexico and I had to buy a new vehicle. The towing experience was night and day different.

I'm not saying you absolutely need a different vehicle, but be aware that driving overweight can be quite stressful in the best of circumstances, especially for those of us who are not terribly experienced with towing (including myself in that statement, BTW).
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Old 09-25-2015, 01:20 PM   #16
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For starters, $10,000 buys a lot of repaires. If you can get a used unit for $10,000 cheaper over a warranty that forces you to deal with warranty repairs I would opt for the savings, and pay for any repairs. I have had three trailers and one (way over weight) 5th wheel and never used the warranty.

When it comes to full timeing it's all in how you want to live. I started out with a 29ft Komfort TT that my wife and I full timed in for three years. Moved up to a 40ft Teton 5th wheel after our first kid was born. Two years later we decided that big and heavy a trailer didn't work out so well, bought a house and a 29ft TT.
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:28 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by TommyAjax View Post
Be careful taking the "it can tow 10,000 lbs" advertising line because I fell for it as well when I bought my Ram 1500 last year. We had originally planned on buying a 28BHBE this year then I stumbled over the payload limitations on the 1/2 ton. My trucks GVWR (basically the maximum weight that should be on the tires/suspension) is 6,900 lbs. I have a few options on the truck (ie. tonneau cover, side steps, etc) that all add weight and reduce my available payload. To be safe, I went to the CAT scales and weighed the truck empty except for me, the kids car seats, and a full tank of gas - came out to 6,000 lbs. That means that I have 900 lbs capacity to add my wife, kids, weight distribution hitch head, and the tongue weight of the trailer, plus any other cargo in the truck before hitting the engineers recommended maximum. Sure the engine and the brakes can pull and stop 10,000 lbs (horizontal stresses), but the frame, suspension, and the tires can only handle 6,900 lbs (vertical stress).

Long story short, we bought a 26BH because it is about 180 lbs lighter on the tongue weight than the 28BHBE.

Lots of people will say that you will be fine exceeding the GVWR and not to worry about it, but there will also be other people that tell you to hit the scales and stay within your limits - your decision to make.
The payload on our truck is 1460. What year and model was your Ram? I can't believe there could be that big of a difference.
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:51 AM   #18
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The payload on our truck is 1460. What year and model was your Ram? I can't believe there could be that big of a difference.
Never mind! I know what you meant. OK, so it is the same as our truck. Did you have a weight distributing hitch? It sounds like those are kind of necessary for a light duty truck.
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:52 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by notaz3 View Post
For starters, $10,000 buys a lot of repaires. If you can get a used unit for $10,000 cheaper over a warranty that forces you to deal with warranty repairs I would opt for the savings, and pay for any repairs. I have had three trailers and one (way over weight) 5th wheel and never used the warranty.

When it comes to full timeing it's all in how you want to live. I started out with a 29ft Komfort TT that my wife and I full timed in for three years. Moved up to a 40ft Teton 5th wheel after our first kid was born. Two years later we decided that big and heavy a trailer didn't work out so well, bought a house and a 29ft TT.
Excellent point. I wasn't looking at it that way.
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Old 09-27-2015, 12:46 AM   #20
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I completely support the comments by others that your GVWR will be the limiting factor in what size trailer you sellect. Also my personal experience is many RV dealers will not perform warranty work on trailer they did not sell. Often times the factory reimbursement for labor is less than the local going rate. Plus how long would you be willing to wait for the factory to authorize repairs while you are without housing? You should find the best trailer for the money regardless of the warranty status. Finally there are many trailers just as good as Jayco. I chose a Jayco because I liked the floor plan. But frames, axles, brakes, appliances, and fixtures are all about the same from company to company. They all use pretty much the same brands when building a trailer.
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