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Old 03-25-2015, 07:54 PM   #11
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So I have another question when I bought the truck I was planning on a smaller trailer than the 28bhbe this unit is around 6100lbs. I knew that my truck was rated to pull 9600lbs so I figured that I had a ton to go before I was close to my weight max. I just learned about the gcwr rating and am now a bit anxious about my combination. The gcwr is 15,000 the truck weighs in at 7200 according to the purchase sticker. Basically this reduces my max tow amount to 7800 then subtract occupants 2 adults 1 child and 2 medium sized dogs 500lbs. 300lbs give or take upgraded trailer options such as insulated under belly and additional insulation upgraded cabinets porcelain stool. This leaves me with 900lbs for cloths , plates and other stuff. Are my calculations correct and is this pushing the capacities of the truck? I don't want to make an expensive mistake any thoughts. how important is it to stay within the GCWR rating? Is the truck still capable of pulling the 9600 regardless of the gcwr? what stated monitor GCWR?
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:02 PM   #12
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My opinion is that it may be to much trailer for that truck and though it may pull it, you may have a less than enjoyable experience. Never push the capacities of anything. They are usually "optimistic". I'm just comparing it to my settup. I have a 27' trailer with two motorcycles and pulled it with a 2500hd duramax and it was no rocketship. I felt it was just right and wouldnt have wanted it with any less power or suspension. There will inevitably be some more wieght you forgot. Like maybe a full fresh water tank for the occasional boondock.
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:05 PM   #13
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Gcwr is the total of your truck and trailer combined and it is what your driveline is tested at as well as frame tensile strength. Basically, stay in that number and your transmission, axles, engine etc are all rated to operate with that total combined weight and not eat themselves and cause you to be a slowpoke holding up traffic.

If your truck weighs 7200lbs- that is a heavy weight! 7200lbs sounds like your GVWR which is the rating for the truck on its own axles fully loaded. I'd bet if you scaled your truck it weighs less.

I watch GCWR and axle ratings. Those are the sheer points where things can wear fast and burn up. If I can stay within GVWR of the tow vehicle- great- if not, I drive accordingly. That's just my take, that doesn't make it "right" or "by the book". In short I think you'll manage, but you'll have to be more aware of you and your surroundings and the fact you are loaded pretty much to cap.

Good luck and happy camping!
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:10 PM   #14
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Where should I look for the truck gvr numbers to make sure I am correct??
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:13 PM   #15
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You can find the GVWR number on a placard inside the drivers door. Also there will be a tag for payload- usually says combined weight of passengers and cargo should not exceed...

To get your wet weight, fuel up, head to the scales and weigh both axles. Subtract that sum from the GVWR listed on the door. That is the net payload available for people, pets, trailer tongue weight, etc.
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:16 PM   #16
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another thing, what happens when you want to take a trip out to the rockies? Be a shame to avoid one of the most scenic parts of the country because you couldnt make it up the inclines......Please dont get me wrong ,Im not trying to be a "negative nellie", I cant believe I just used that expression, I just think you would be better off with a 22'-24' or so with that truck. You wont believe how big it looks when its hooked up behind you.
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:33 PM   #17
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Ok so what rule of thumb should I follow? I have about 1,000lbs before I am at my GCWR according to the data I have prior to adding stuff. I would think that adding 500lbs is a lot of stuff plates and cloths food? How much room weight wise is a good rule of thumb. like I said the truck stats towing max is 9600 and I am pulling 6100 pound trailer as well as cloths and occupants of the truck if I am close to the GCWR why is the tow rating so much higher? I have the truck and the trailer is ordered smaller trailers are not much lighter maybe 500-1000lbs. Smurfs_of_War how far from your GCWR are you and how does your rig pull??
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:44 PM   #18
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My GCWR for my rig is 15600lbs. Tow rating is 9650lbs. Fully loaded for a 2 week trip we came in at 13300lbs GCW. Pulled like a freight train- no issues with power and handling nor any overheating issues engine braking and service braking was excellent. My GVWR with the trailer connected is something I won't get into on here hahahaha!

Your GCWR and Tow rating are figured with an empty truck and a skinny 150lbs driver and no options. Add weight to the truck, tow cap goes down accordingly.

In my opinion- and take it for what it's worth- as long as you are within your GCWR of your particular truck, you will be fine. There really is no set in stone rule. It's more of a comfort zone and easy calculator. You won't have issues pulling the trailer within those design specifications. Cross that rating by too much and you become a test pilot. I am not figuring your trucks GVWR into this since that is a whole other topic.

This begs the question- do you have a tow package on the Z71 of some sort? Typically includes upgarded cooling for transmission etc as well as trailer brake control?
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:52 PM   #19
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Looks like a REALLY nice trailer! I just bought a 2015 Jay Flight 32RLDS and can't wait for it to warm up enough to de-winterize and go camping!!!

But IMO, you may find your truck is overloaded with that trailer - sorry to say. There will be folks here who disagree with me, but most 1/2-tons (1500s) are overloaded with a travel trailer that has more than 500-600 pounds of tongue weight. It's not about towing capacity, but rather, the GVWR of the tow vehicle.

GROSS VEHICLE WEIGHT RATING (GVWR) This
number, in pounds, is the maximum amount a tow vehicle
may weigh. Everything that contributes to the weight of the
tow vehicle is featured in this rating, including the weight of
the vehicle, driver and all passengers, fuel, payload, tongue
load of the trailer, weight of hitch and all optional
equipment. The GVWR is displayed on the driver ’s door or
door-lock pillar label of your GMC vehicle.

TONGUE (OR HITCH) WEIGHT The tongue weight is the
total amount of trailer weight that is pressing down on the
trailer hitch. Keep in mind that the way a trailer is loaded
affects the overall tongue weight and will also affect the
handling of the tow vehicle when trailering.

The specs on your truck says your payload capacity is 1890#. According to Jayco, your trailer GVWR is 9250#, which could put up to 900# or more on your hitch. That only leaves 900# or so in people, gear, etc. It will be close, and it will struggle when you get the trailer loaded. (And water weighs 8.2#/gallon.)

You'd be surprised how much all your food, clothes, and other stuff in your trailer weighs. If it were me, I'd go to a scale and weigh all axles, just to be aware.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:00 PM   #20
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The above is good advice. My trailer is around 5500lbs loaded with a tongue weight over 700lbs. I am over payload by quite a bit and I had to make modifications to the truck to handle it all properly. Since we are losing two of our kids as of this year and all their associated junk, we opted out of an HD.
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