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Old 03-25-2015, 10:41 AM   #61
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If I were to see a trap set up for a kid I would most likely have to be bailed out of jail soon after I discovered its purpose and had a face to face meeting with it's owner. Don't do that anywhere close to me unless you want your face pulled off.

Those posts need to be taken down.
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:09 AM   #62
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If anyone set any sort of "booby traps" that would be reason to be kicked out of the park. That's just foolish talk.

I have found when parents are responsible then the kids are also responsible. If someone cuts through another camp sight if they are explained why that is not allowed it stops. Sometimes it's just because they don't know. As was explained in a previous post, just because you have a group of kids, doesn't mean it will be a poor experience. I choose to work at family oriented campgrounds because I enjoy the interaction with the kids and the energy they bring to the campground. We have rules for a reason, parents have to be with their kids at the pool, etc. We tend to attract parents who actually enjoy their kids and enjoy being with their kids. Those that want to drink and let the kids run wild are soon brought back to reality, or they choose to leave. Bad behavior is not tolerated, everyone has the right to a good camping experience.

I have found, at least in the west, public campgrounds are not supervised as well as private. Rangers many times will have multiple campgrounds under their responsibilities. Sometimes they will have a single camp host, who is limited as to what he alone can do. Also because they cost less, they tend to draw a different clientele. The entitlement society is showing up in many ways, being respectful of others is becoming less and less important. Sadly there are many politicians who push this entitlement mentality, to try and gain support for themselves. This is not what made this country great, what made it great was the sense of community and being respectful of others. Hopefully we can get back to this. Campers for the most part ARE the responsible and thoughtful types of people, but, as more join our ranks, we will continue to garner all types. It is up to us, as seasoned campers, to show others the proper way to camp, being respectful of others and also of our natural surroundings.

Camping season is here, enjoy !
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:12 AM   #63
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x2, wags999. You said it very well!
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:18 AM   #64
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x3, wags999. Absolutely!
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Old 03-25-2015, 12:59 PM   #65
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I do believe the post made with the fishing line comment was in jest and not to be taken seriously.

If you look at that (link--->) POST, you'll notice the emoticon ":hihi:" that we no longer have in the "Smiles" on this forum. Had the emoticon image still be appearing, I think it would have been crystal clear that the poster was only kidding.
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Old 03-25-2015, 01:34 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FPM III View Post
I do believe the post made with the fishing line comment was in jest and not to be taken seriously.

If you look at that (link--->) POST, you'll notice the emoticon ":hihi:" that we no longer have in the "Smiles" on this forum. Had the emoticon image still be appearing, I think it would have been crystal clear that the poster was only kidding.
Yeppers, fully agree it was in jest ... nothing for us to get our knickers-in-knots over. That is the beauty of the human-race, we're all good people (who love camping) but with different ways of getting to the same point. Bottom-line, we want to advocate good campground etiquette ... so let the campfire chat over this continue!
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Old 03-25-2015, 02:22 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FPM III View Post
I do believe the post made with the fishing line comment was in jest and not to be taken seriously.

If you look at that (link--->) POST, you'll notice the emoticon ":hihi:" that we no longer have in the "Smiles" on this forum. Had the emoticon image still be appearing, I think it would have been crystal clear that the poster was only kidding.
That's good to know. It's just hard to laugh about tripping little kids. But I get it now.
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Old 03-25-2015, 04:59 PM   #68
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When I was a Boy Scout (in the 80's & 90's) and in my personal life, we were taught camping etiquette.

We were taught NEVER to enter a campsite without EXPLICIT permission, always respect other campers, clean up before and after ourselves, respect quiet hours, tread lightly, etc. As I became a leader in our troop, I discovered it was EASY to teach youngsters all this stuff, but the adults, not so much.

Now as an adult and father, I look forward to teaching my son all those things. He's a bit young at 5 months to pick this stuff up, but I fully expect him to behave properly when we're camping (and all the time really). That doesn't mean we can't have LOADS of fun, that doesn't mean I can't rekindle some of that childhood curiosity and spirit I had, it just means we have to do it right.

I see and hear many of the same things you folks mention on here, but I've been fortunate enough for rudeness and disrespect to be the exceptions while camping. By and large, most of the people I've encountered have been really great, and I hope to be counted in that category by other campers. And I think that is the key.
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Old 03-25-2015, 05:10 PM   #69
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OK I know all this does not apply to RV parks but the Scout Master in me just had to post this.




The principles of Leave No Trace might seem unimportant until you consider the combined effects of millions of outdoor visitors. One poorly located campsite or campfire may have little significance, but thousands of such instances seriously degrade the outdoor experience for all. Leaving no trace is everyone's responsibility.

1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
Proper trip planning and preparation helps hikers and campers accomplish trip goals safely and enjoyably while minimizing damage to natural and cultural resources. Campers who plan ahead can avoid unexpected situations, and minimize their impact by complying with area regulations such as observing limitations on group size. Schedule your trek to avoid times of high use. Obtain permits or permission to use the area for your trek.
Proper planning ensures
Low-risk adventures because campers obtained information concerning geography and weather and prepared accordingly
Properly located campsites because campers allotted enough time to reach their destination
Appropriate campfires and minimal trash because of careful meal planning and food repackaging and proper equipment
Comfortable and fun camping and hiking experiences because the outing matches the skill level of the participants


2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
Damage to land occurs when visitors trample vegetation or communities of organisms beyond recovery. The resulting barren areas develop into undesirable trails, campsites, and soil erosion.
Concentrate Activity, or Spread Out?
In high-use areas, campers should concentrate their activities where vegetation is already absent. Minimize resource damage by using existing trails and selecting designated or existing campsites. Keep campsites small by arranging tents in close proximity.
In more remote, less-traveled areas, campers should generally spread out. When hiking, take different paths to avoid creating new trails that cause erosion. When camping, disperse tents and cooking activities—and move camp daily to avoid creating permanent-looking campsites. Avoid places where impacts are just beginning to show. Always choose the most durable surfaces available: rock, gravel, sand, compacted soil, dry grasses, or snow.
These guidelines apply to most alpine settings and may be different for other areas, such as deserts. Learn the Leave No Trace techniques for your crew's specific activity or destination. Check with land managers to be sure of the proper technique.


3. Dispose of Waste Properly (Pack It In, Pack It Out)
This simple yet effective saying motivates backcountry visitors to take their trash home with them. It makes sense to carry out of the backcountry the extra materials taken there by your group or others. Inspect your campsite for trash or spilled foods. Accept the challenge of packing out all trash, leftover food, and litter.
Sanitation
Backcountry users create body waste and wastewater that require proper disposal.
Wastewater. Help prevent contamination of natural water sources: After straining food particles, properly dispose of dishwater by dispersing at least 200 feet (about 80 to 100 strides for a youth) from springs, streams, and lakes. Use biodegradable soap 200 feet or more from any water source.
Human Waste. Proper human waste disposal helps prevent the spread of disease and exposure to others. Catholes 6 to 8 inches deep in humus and 200 feet from water, trails, and campsites are often the easiest and most practical way to dispose of feces.


4. Leave What You Find
Allow others a sense of discovery, and preserve the past. Leave rocks, plants, animals, archaeological artifacts, and other objects as you find them. Examine but do not touch cultural or historical structures and artifacts. It may be illegal to remove artifacts.
Minimize Site Alterations
Do not dig tent trenches or build lean-tos, tables, or chairs. Never hammer nails into trees, hack at trees with hatchets or saws, or damage bark and roots by tying horses to trees for extended periods. Replace surface rocks or twigs that you cleared from the campsite. On high-impact sites, clean the area and dismantle inappropriate user-built facilities such as multiple fire rings and log seats or tables.
Good campsites are found, not made. Avoid altering a site, digging trenches, or building structures.


5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
Some people would not think of camping without a campfire. Yet the naturalness of many areas has been degraded by overuse of fires and increasing demand for firewood.
Lightweight camp stoves make low-impact camping possible by encouraging a shift away from fires. Stoves are fast, eliminate the need for firewood, and make cleanup after meals easier. After dinner, enjoy a candle lantern instead of a fire.
If you build a fire, the most important consideration is the potential for resource damage. Whenever possible, use an existing campfire ring in a well-placed campsite. Choose not to have a fire in areas where wood is scarce—at higher elevations, in heavily used areas with a limited wood supply, or in desert settings.
True Leave No Trace fires are small. Use dead and downed wood that can be broken easily by hand. When possible, burn all wood to ash and remove all unburned trash and food from the fire ring. If a site has two or more fire rings, you may dismantle all but one and scatter the materials in the surrounding area. Be certain all wood and campfire debris is cold out.


6. Respect Wildlife
Quick movements and loud noises are stressful to animals. Considerate campers practice these safety methods:
Observe wildlife from afar to avoid disturbing them.
Give animals a wide berth, especially during breeding, nesting, and birthing seasons.
Store food securely and keep garbage and food scraps away from animals so they will not acquire bad habits. Never feed wildlife. Help keep wildlife wild.
You are too close if an animal alters its normal activities.


7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors
Thoughtful campers respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience.
Travel and camp in small groups (no more than the group size prescribed by land managers).
Let nature's sounds prevail. Keep the noise down and leave radios, tape players, and pets at home.
Select campsites away from other groups to help preserve their solitude.
Always travel and camp quietly to avoid disturbing other visitors.
Make sure the colors of clothing and gear blend with the environment.
Respect private property and leave gates (open or closed) as found.
Be considerate of other campers and respect their privacy.

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Old 03-25-2015, 08:26 PM   #70
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Now as an adult and father, I look forward to teaching my son all those things. He's a bit young at 5 months to pick this stuff up, but I fully expect him to behave properly when we're camping (and all the time really). That doesn't mean we can't have LOADS of fun, that doesn't mean I can't rekindle some of that childhood curiosity and spirit I had, it just means we have to do it right.
Kudos to you - don't we wish all of our fellow camper pass such wisdom on to their children too.
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