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Old 03-28-2013, 05:24 PM   #11
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Whenever anyone asks me why I prefer to camp in an RV rather than stay at a hotel, I always tell them:

"Because when I get into bed at night, I know who slept in it the previous night.".

Funny, but once I say that, the conversation suddenly changes to some other subject.
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Old 03-29-2013, 07:08 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by FPM III View Post
Whenever anyone asks me why I prefer to camp in an RV rather than stay at a hotel, I always tell them:

"Because when I get into bed at night, I know who slept in it the previous night.".

Funny, but once I say that, the conversation suddenly changes to some other subject.
Exactly! My wife has a saying about staying in hotels vs. camping, "I'd rather sleep in my own dirt". She considers camping as "anything off the ground". We started out in tents, but after getting flooded out in Arkansas, she said that if I wanted her to camp anymore I'd have to get her "off the ground".
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:14 AM   #13
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Exactly! My wife has a saying about staying in hotels vs. camping, "I'd rather sleep in my own dirt". She considers camping as "anything off the ground". We started out in tents, but after getting flooded out in Arkansas, she said that if I wanted her to camp anymore I'd have to get her "off the ground".
We camped in Hershey PA last year and most of the extended weekend was a washout. At times we had a river running underneath our TT. The out-of-state tent campers (2) sites down spent the entire weekend in their fogged up car. Sunday when we woke up, Everything (tents, poles, blankets) were piled up in a heap by the drive and they were history.
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Old 03-30-2013, 01:13 PM   #14
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My observation on tent camping is that if it rains continuously for more than 12 hours, most of the tent campers will pack up and go home. Even if the tent remains dry inside, there's nothing more miserable than that damp, cold feeling, sitting on a sleeping bag with nothing to do but look at the walls and listen to the rain pounding while you watch it pouring down outside.

One of the saddest tent camping cases I ever witnessed (besides my own which I'm going to tell you about) was a tent I saw in Assateague State Park in Maryland the day after Hurricane Charley passed through back in 1986. I was a tent camper myself back then and had arrived with my wife and two sons at Cape Henlopen State park, near Rehoboth Beach, DE, totally unaware of any dangerous weather conditions approaching. Back then, there were no reservation systems and I pulled up to the hut to inquire about site availability. The conversation went like this:

Me: "Hi. Do you have any sites available?"
Ranger: "Yeah, I've got lots available. But I don't think you're going to want to camp here."
Me: "huh? Why not?"
Ranger: "Well, Hurricane Charley's coming up the coast and we're going to evacuate the campground in about the next hour or two".

I ended up finding a motel and Charley made his visit overnight. It was more rain than anything and the biggest problem encountered was flooding which was, for the most part, just an inconvenience. Due to the uncertainties of the Henlopen's condition, I decided to head south to Assateague and see what things looked down there. While riding through the park, I came upon this campsite with this tent pitched on it that was completely surrounded by at least six inches of water. The tent looked like it's own little castle surrounded by a moat. However, I was certain the "moat" had infiltrated its interior.

When I returned to Cape Henlopen, they were accepting campers, so I got a site there. However, the remnants of Charley with high winds and off and on rain remained. The wind was so strong that it was causing the tent to lean. I tied rope from the tops of the tent poles to long sand stakes in the ground. That evening we went out to dinner as we were unable cook in the adverse weather. We returned to find that the wind had blown under the tent and pulled out all the stakes. the only thing that had kept it from completely blowing away were the lines I had attached to the tops of the poles. The whole tent was flapping in the wind like a flag that was being held horizontally rather than vertically.

While my boys sat in the cab, my wife and I threw everything in the back of the truck. We drove to Baltimore, found a motel and explored the city until it was time to go home (with the soaking wet tent still in the back of the truck). Upon returning home, we immediately started looking for a pop-up- and purchased one about a month later. On the maiden voyage, we thought we died and went to heaven compared to camping in a tent.
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Old 03-30-2013, 01:33 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by fpm iii View Post
my observation on tent camping is that if it rains continuously for more than 12 hours, most of the tent campers will pack up and go home. Even if the tent remains dry inside, there's nothing more miserable than that damp, cold feeling, sitting on a sleeping bag with nothing to do but look at the walls and listen to the rain pounding while you watch it pouring down outside.

One of the saddest tent camping cases i ever witnessed (besides my own which i'm going to tell you about) was a tent i saw in assateague state park in maryland the day after hurricane charley passed through back in 1986. I was a tent camper myself back then and had arrived with my wife and two sons at cape henlopen state park, near rehoboth beach, de, totally unaware of any dangerous weather conditions approaching. Back then, there were no reservation systems and i pulled up to the hut to inquire about site availability. The conversation went like this:

Me: "hi. Do you have any sites available?"
ranger: "yeah, i've got lots available. But i don't think you're going to want to camp here."
me: "huh? Why not?"
ranger: "well, hurricane charley's coming up the coast and we're going to evacuate the campground in about the next hour or two".

I ended up finding a motel and charley made his visit overnight. It was more rain than anything and the biggest problem encountered was flooding which was, for the most part, just an inconvenience. Due to the uncertainties of the henlopen's condition, i decided to head south to assateague and see what things looked down there. While riding through the park, i came upon this campsite with this tent pitched on it that was completely surrounded by at least six inches of water. The tent looked like it's own little castle surrounded by a moat. However, i was certain the "moat" had infiltrated its interior.

When i returned to cape henlopen, they were accepting campers, so i got a site there. However, the remnants of charley with high winds and off and on rain remained. The wind was so strong that it was causing the tent to lean. I tied rope from the tops of the tent poles to long sand stakes in the ground. That evening we went out to dinner as we were unable cook in the adverse weather. We returned to find that the wind had blown under the tent and pulled out all the stakes. The only thing that had kept it from completely blowing away were the lines i had attached to the tops of the poles. The whole tent was flapping in the wind like a flag that was being held horizontally rather than vertically.

While my boys sat in the cab, my wife and i threw everything in the back of the truck. We drove to baltimore, found a motel and explored the city until it was time to go home (with the soaking wet tent still in the back of the truck). Upon returning home, we immediately started looking for a pop-up- and purchased one about a month later. On the maiden voyage, we thought we died and went to heaven compared to camping in a tent.
[attach=config]7891[/attach]

great story!!!!!
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Old 03-30-2013, 02:31 PM   #16
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What's your idea of camping....???

loved the tent story! thanks for sharing

We used to tent camp as well, we started small, then bought a big Costco special with screened in room just for the 2 of us and 2 dogs. This tent was made for at least 8.
We sold it and went without until we could afford to get ourselves a truck and a camper.
While in Watkins Glen last year, we too witnessed some wet tent campers. We never had the heart to spend a whole weekend in a tent praying for the sun to shine but these guys did stay a couple of nights. Bless their hearts lol
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Old 03-30-2013, 02:35 PM   #17
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My son related this to me upon his return from a tour in Afghanistan where his section (three crew and six infantrymen) lived out of their L.A.V. out in the desert for months. Upon arrival back at the airport the three married men in the section received a cell phone call and as a result all looked pretty dejected as they boarded the bus back to base. Seems their wives had got together loaded up their three campers with dogs and kids etc. and were waiting at the base to pick the boys up and head out for a surprise week long "camping trip". Guess what camping is depends on your point of view.
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Old 03-30-2013, 02:48 PM   #18
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hahaha! poor guys! but I am sure they had a great time.
I've done both ( not afghanistan, just exercises) and I can assure you that RVing is much more fun and comfortable.
Although, the army does have lots of generators and sure knows how to heat up a tent! We used to hook up what looks like dryer vents piping to the heaters and hook up several tents to pump heat in there. Scary when I think back.
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