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Old 10-09-2013, 09:43 PM   #11
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Nother update:

I worked out a switching arrangement for the inverter to wire into the panel. First, the panel takes the 30A shore power and divides into branch circuits with breakers. I did some testing, flip the breaker and see what is still on. Its roughly divided into the appliances, the sockets, and the converter/charger. My requirements are:

1. Manual switching (I'll explain why).
2. converter/charger has to get switched out, or else a loop gets created.
3. Able to switch at any time, ie., even if both power sources are active.

The manual switch part is because automatic transfer switches are expensive, and they don't handle the converter/charger switchout. I don't mind manually switching it, it takes no power, its simple, and it can be tested even if shore power is hooked up.

The inverter will be mounted inside, in the front. I am going to look in that front panel under the bed, but it would also be ok to mount in the trunk compartment. The battery hookup will be short (3-4 feet) and exit the bottom. The front plugs will go to romex, and either run under the body, or through compartments, I will look. The inverter gets a remote control panel.

The romex gets terminated to the load box. I going to use a S822/U NKK switch, DPDT rated 30A @120v. I'll have to find a place in the box to mount it, preferably the front. The wiring is:

Switch 1 terminal 1 - shore power
Switch 1 terminal 2 - Inverter power
Switch 1 common - 110v to breakers (except the converter charger)

Switch 2 terminal 1 - Shore power
Switch 2 terminal 2 - N. C.
Switch 2 common - Converter charger breaker.

Thus the terminal 1 position enables shore power to breakers with converter charger on, and the terminal 2 position enables inverter power with the converter charger OFF.

Hopefully that makes it clear.
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Old 10-19-2013, 05:18 PM   #12
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I have updated my Solar Album ( https://www.jaycoowners.com/album.php?albumid=329 ) which shows how my solar/inverter/shore power has been wired in. A few additional items of concern are (1) if you order solar panels from an unknown supplier, they may be sending you panels that did not meet the minimum standards set by the industry. So be careful where you purchase them from. The second item is to make sure you are buying "LOW" voltage panels if you are going to be using a low cost 12 volt battery controller to interface your panel to your battery(s). They have a maximum voltage of around 16 to 19 volts. There are also "HIGH" voltage panels which produce about 31 Volts DC, and they can not be connected to a normal battery controller, because the controller does not drop the voltage to the acceptable 12 volt range. The "HIGH" voltage panels need to be connected to a MPPT battery controller, as you can select the system voltage (12/24/48) that your batteries are operating on. If you click on my album I have an easy to read wiring diagram for my "HIGH" voltage system, but the layout can be substituted with items needed for a 12Volt "LOW" voltage system.
Don
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2013 Jayco Eagle 284BHS
250Watt Grape Solar Panel, MorningStar MPPT 60 Charge Controller
1500 Watt Ramsond PSI, 2 Trojan T145 Batteries (260Ah)
2 - AirSight Wireless IP Cameras (used as rear view cameras)
EnGenius WI-FI extender, D-Link wireless (n) modem
MagicJack Internet Phone
2012 Ford F150XLT, EcoBoost w/3.73
157" Wheel base, HD Towing Package

Our Solar Album https://www.jaycoowners.com/album.php?albumid=329
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Old 10-20-2013, 07:30 AM   #13
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Sorry, as I re-read my post I noticed that I used a wrong term. It is not called a battery controller, but charge controller. Here is the updated text with a copy of the wiring diagram below.
Don

I have updated my Solar Album ( https://www.jaycoowners.com/album.php?albumid=329 ) which shows how my solar/inverter/shore power has been wired in. A few additional items of concern are (1) if you order solar panels from an unknown supplier, they may be sending you panels that did not meet the minimum standards set by the industry. So be careful where you purchase them from. The second item is to make sure you are buying "LOW" voltage panels if you are going to be using a low cost 12 volt charge controller to interface your panel to your battery(s). They have a maximum voltage of around 16 to 19 volts. There are also "HIGH" voltage panels which produce about 31 Volts DC, and they can not be connected to a normal charge controller, because the controller does not drop the voltage to the acceptable 12 volt range. The "HIGH" voltage panels need to be connected to a MPPT battery controller, as you can select the system voltage (12/24/48) that your batteries are operating on. If you click on my album I have an easy to read wiring diagram for my "HIGH" voltage system, but the layout can be substituted with items needed for a 12Volt "LOW" voltage system.

[ATTACH][/ATTACH]
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2013 Jayco Eagle 284BHS
250Watt Grape Solar Panel, MorningStar MPPT 60 Charge Controller
1500 Watt Ramsond PSI, 2 Trojan T145 Batteries (260Ah)
2 - AirSight Wireless IP Cameras (used as rear view cameras)
EnGenius WI-FI extender, D-Link wireless (n) modem
MagicJack Internet Phone
2012 Ford F150XLT, EcoBoost w/3.73
157" Wheel base, HD Towing Package

Our Solar Album https://www.jaycoowners.com/album.php?albumid=329
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Old 10-21-2013, 01:51 PM   #14
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Be aware that you have created a loop. The PD4000 contains a battery charger. When plugged into the inverter, the charger is powered by it, and it is trying to charge the batteries that are supplying the inverter, etc. Not good.
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Old 10-21-2013, 02:55 PM   #15
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Thanks for the concern.
Actually the PD 4000 in the TT has been turned off since I installed the solar panel/charge controller in May. Prior to purchasing the MorningStar MPPT charge controller, I talked with MorningStar regarding having the two operating at the same time and their reply was that it did not matter, as the MorningStar charge controller would look at the output of the TT charge controller, at the batteries and consider it battery voltage and the TT charge controller would be in control. Should the TT controller drop off the MorningStar controller would take over. I tested it the first few days after I installed MorningStar charge controller and it operated as they said it would. After monitoring the Solar Panel setup working on its own for a week, I decided to turn off the TT's charge controller (which I wired to its own breaker) and the Solar panel cares for the fan and other 12vdc items without any assistance. That was in May, so far so good...
Since May the panel has generated 65Kw as required by the batteries, and I don't have to pay anything to the electric company for the TT in storage next to the house.
Have a GREAT DAY!!
Don

Click image for larger version

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ID:	10415
__________________
2013 Jayco Eagle 284BHS
250Watt Grape Solar Panel, MorningStar MPPT 60 Charge Controller
1500 Watt Ramsond PSI, 2 Trojan T145 Batteries (260Ah)
2 - AirSight Wireless IP Cameras (used as rear view cameras)
EnGenius WI-FI extender, D-Link wireless (n) modem
MagicJack Internet Phone
2012 Ford F150XLT, EcoBoost w/3.73
157" Wheel base, HD Towing Package

Our Solar Album https://www.jaycoowners.com/album.php?albumid=329
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Old 10-21-2013, 06:47 PM   #16
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Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustang65 View Post
Thanks for the concern.
Actually the PD 4000 in the TT has been turned off since I installed the solar panel/charge controller in May. Prior to purchasing the MorningStar MPPT charge controller, I talked with MorningStar regarding having the two operating at the same time and their reply was that it did not matter, as the MorningStar charge controller would look at the output of the TT charge controller, at the batteries and consider it battery voltage and the TT charge controller would be in control. Should the TT controller drop off the MorningStar controller would take over. I tested it the first few days after I installed MorningStar charge controller and it operated as they said it would. After monitoring the Solar Panel setup working on its own for a week, I decided to turn off the TT's charge controller (which I wired to its own breaker) and the Solar panel cares for the fan and other 12vdc items without any assistance. That was in May, so far so good...
Since May the panel has generated 65Kw as required by the batteries, and I don't have to pay anything to the electric company for the TT in storage next to the house.
Have a GREAT DAY!!
Don

Attachment 10415
Yea, thats not bad, I had thought about it. I went with a big 30amp DTDP switch to flip the entire circuit over, and to kill the 110v charger at the same time. Like you, I checked, was told there was no basic conflict, and in my mind figure the shore charger would only go into effect if, you know, the sun burned out or something (a real bad day to go camping, IMHO).

Scotty
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Old 11-03-2013, 11:30 AM   #17
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Location: Minnesota
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Solar roof mount

I have a pair of 100 watt windy nation panels wired in parallel hooked up to a Morningstar Duo 25 amp PWM charger hitting a pair of group 24 12v deep cycle batteries in parallel. In full sun I am seeing 22 volts from the panels with 8 amps @ 14.4v to the batteries. The trailer is a 184bh with LED light panels replacing the original cabin bulbs, Trimetric monitor installed with a Fluke DMM verifying measurements as I installed, tested and shake things out.

Just in time for hunting, ran the furnace at 1/4 temp on the thermostat and one cabin light overnight for 10 hours with temps just above freezing and was at 91% power in the AM. Should have plenty of juice for essentials and charging phones plus radio or even TV in the evening. Big upgrade from the wall tent and wood burning stove last year.
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