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Old 02-27-2015, 02:10 PM   #1
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Tire Inflation

My trailer tires are the ST ones. TT bought new from the dealer, the inflation pressure they put in all of the tires is 42 PSI with the pressure listed on the tire being 50 psi. On my prior Forest River TT, I had a dealer check everything including tire pressures and get it ready for a trip and later when I checked tire pressure, what they had put in was substantially smaller than that listed on the tire. Making an assumption that what was on the tire was a max pressure, I figured this was okay. However when I brought that up on a forum, everyone was adamant that I needed the higher pressure (50 psi). So I'm getting ready to head 900 miles home....do I leave the tire pressure at 42 psi or raise it?
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Old 02-27-2015, 02:22 PM   #2
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You should check the yellow sticker on the street side of the trailer. It will list the suggested tire pressure.

That being said, I tow with mine 5 lbs over max sidewall pressure. Or at the very least AT the sidewall max pressure.

References:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete...jsp?techid=219

"Industry standards dictate tires with the ST designation are speed rated to 65 MPH (104 km/h) under normal inflation and load conditions.

However Goodyear Marathon and Power King Towmax STR tires featuring the ST size designation may be used at speeds between 66 and 75 mph (106 and 121 km/h) by increasing their cold inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) above the recommended pressure for the rated maximum load.

Do not exceed the wheel's maximum rated pressure. If the maximum pressure for the wheel prohibits the increase of air pressure, then maximum speed must be restricted to 65 mph (104 km/h).

The cold inflation pressure must not exceed 10 psi (69 kPa) beyond the inflation specified for the maximum load of the tire.

Increasing the inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) does not provide any additional load carrying capacity."


I don't typically drive more than about 65 at the most, and I'm nowhere close to max loaded conditions for my trailer.
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Old 02-27-2015, 02:41 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Camper_bob View Post

However Goodyear Marathon and Power King Towmax STR tires featuring the ST size designation may be used at speeds between 66 and 75 mph (106 and 121 km/h) by increasing their cold inflation pressure by 10 psi (69 kPa) above the recommended pressure for the rated maximum load.
I run my at 50psi and don't typically go above 65 unless passing. I didn't know the above info, so may increase my tires psi... Not to travel any faster but would like that added insurance when passing.
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Old 02-27-2015, 03:17 PM   #4
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I amaze myself at how I can make the simplest thing complicated. As many times as I've referenced that sticker on the side as I've looked at campers and their weights, I forgot about it. I had looked at a sticker on the inside of the camper I'd seen and in the manual which of course has nothing in it for that info. So the sticker on the side says 50 psi. Even though I rarely go over 60 unless passing, that's also good to know on the above. I think I'll be good with 50.
I was befuddled because when I checked the camper tires, they seemed to be underinflated and when I checked car tires, they were 38 psi all around (and should have 35) and that was from the dealer last time I had them rotated. I thought maybe I had a air pressure gremlin traveling with me.
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Old 02-27-2015, 03:18 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Vaneta View Post
...snip....do I leave the tire pressure at 42 psi or raise it?
Raise it to what it says on the sidewall: 50psi.

You should also have the pressure gauge you will be using 'checked.' I've done that by having my service station AND local tire store set different tires at a certain pressure...

"My left tire looked low. Could you please inflate it to (whatever) psi.".

Then check it with your gauge. Not scientific, but it gave me more confidence in my gauge.
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Old 02-28-2015, 05:59 PM   #6
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Well today I was gonna let some air out of my car tires and noticed the gauge had come "unscrewed" a bit so when I tightened it (I finally bought a large non-electronic gauge with a long hose so I could actually see it), car tires were correct at 35 psi. So re-checked trailer and they were still low. I'm guessing from our conversations, the dealer knew I'd be running "light" and figured I might get a better ride or something if it wasn't at max.
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Old 02-28-2015, 06:16 PM   #7
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...snip... I'm guessing from our conversations, the dealer knew I'd be running "light" and figured I might get a better ride or something if it wasn't at max.
IMHO, and off the top of my head, I'd still go with the maximum pressure it says on the tire. Here's why I choose to do that:
1) Lower rolling resistance for better fuel economy.
2) Lower tire temperature from less sidewall flexing (especially when loaded) for longer tire life.
3) Less sidewall flex for better trailer handling (less sway).
4) Less stress on the tire sidewalls when cornering/backing at sharp angles with tandem axles.
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Old 02-28-2015, 06:24 PM   #8
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Well, the third one alone is enough reason for me. I checked out a service station on my way out that has an air hose that's accessible so I think I'll be visiting it in the morning.
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Old 02-28-2015, 06:38 PM   #9
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Well, the third one alone is enough reason for me. I checked out a service station on my way out that has an air hose that's accessible so I think I'll be visiting it in the morning.
If sway is an issue for you when towing, be sure your Tow Vehicle rear tires are inflated to their maximum, too, when you tow. And,if you increase the pressure in your rear tires, you should probably increase the fronts, too, but usually a bit lower than the rears (depending upon the vehicle handling).

Higher tire pressures almost always result in a harsher ride, but that is not dangerous... sway is dangerous.
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Old 03-02-2015, 06:19 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by oldmanAZ View Post
If sway is an issue for you when towing, be sure your Tow Vehicle rear tires are inflated to their maximum, too, when you tow. And,if you increase the pressure in your rear tires, you should probably increase the fronts, too, but usually a bit lower than the rears (depending upon the vehicle handling).

Higher tire pressures almost always result in a harsher ride, but that is not dangerous... sway is dangerous.
Not sure about this....I was always told to fill the tires of the tow vehicle to the recommended pressure that is listed on the drivers door jamb, and NOT the maximum tire pressure that is listed on the tire sidewall.

Again, this is the vehicle doing the towing, and not the TT.
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