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Old 08-27-2014, 08:33 PM   #11
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Just had a 30 circuit installed in the Houston area and it cost me $300. It's well worth it when I am working on theTT.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:23 PM   #12
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Those 30amp 120v rv circuits can definitely vary in price depending on what material they used, how far from the panel, but that is proper to code way to do it.
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:45 PM   #13
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Forget the 110volts. Your Rv uses 110. (Its actually between 113&118) Its a question of amperage. Most house wiring is 14 gauge and cannot handle 30 amps over a long distance. Also the length of the extension cord comes into play here. If you are unable I highly recommend hiring an electrician and install a thirty amp service. 30 amp service should be at least 12 and if any distance involved then it should be 10 gauge. As for why now...most likely your compressor on the AC kept cycling off and on. Every time it came on it put a temporary load on the wiring that exceeded what the size wire for the distance could hold that amount of amperage. Now add this to what ever else was on the circuit in the house. I have a 13k btu unit. Operating it draws 14 amps but when first starting it goes to 16. 14 gauge wiring is generally rated for 15 amps but can handle 20 in short runs. The length of the wiring in the wall as well as the extension cord is very important when figuring out wire size and amperage load.
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Old 08-28-2014, 05:05 AM   #14
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Contact the AC manufacturer, or check your manual for specs, to find out how many amps you need for start-up and running. The amps necessary for proper operation are measured at the AC (or other device).

If you don't have the proper gauge wire, or you get too far from the breaker, you will have a loss of power. In other words, you can have less amps available to your device than the breaker is rated for.
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Old 08-29-2014, 05:54 AM   #15
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Did you use the same length extension cord with the new trailer that you did with the old one? Even if you have a cord that is heavy enough gauge, you don't want to use one that is any longer than absolutely needed. There is more loss in a long cord vs a short one and if you were marginally ok with a short one, the longer cord could cause enough voltage drop to cause your problem.
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Old 08-29-2014, 03:31 PM   #16
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It was a really long cord. I just purchased a dog bone adaptor and a really heavy duty cord from the dealer. Thanks for all the input
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Old 08-31-2014, 07:42 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tugboat95 View Post
Most house wiring is 14 gauge and cannot handle 30 amps over a long distance. Also the length of the extension cord comes into play here. 14 gauge wiring is generally rated for 15 amps but can handle 20 in short runs. The length of the wiring in the wall as well as the extension cord is very important when figuring out wire size and amperage load.
House wiring can be either 14 gauge or 12 gauge. Usually light circuits are 14 ga and electrical outlets or combined outlet/lighting circuits are 12 ga. To meet code, 14 Gauge wire should only be connected to a 15 amp breaker. 12 gauge wire should be connected to a 20 amp breaker. The first step is to look at the circuit you were connecting to. Go to the panel in the house and see what size breaker is protecting the circuit you plan on using. Then check the breaker in your TT electrical panel. If it is a 15 amp breaker it is okay to plug into a 15 or 20 amp house circuit, though a 20 amp would be best. If your trailer breaker says 20 amps, then you should only plug into a 20 amp circuit. Never connect a 20 amp load to a 15 amp circuit. If you need an extension cord to reach the outlet use on a 30 amp RV cord. None of the cords you will buy in the local big box or Wally World stores will be heavy enough to handle 15 amps.
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