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Old 02-26-2014, 08:46 AM   #11
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I noticed in another members profile signature that he has a DLS-55, WIbadger. I would guess he could weigh in with some facts on how well the charger works.
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Old 02-26-2014, 11:02 AM   #12
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Existing WFCO converter

snip...so I just pulled the IOTA wiring and landed the PD9245 wiring in it's place at the breaker....snip

Thank you for this feedback, I will check into this on the WFCO WF-8735-P, only glanced at the basic wire diagram in lid and it ~seems~ I could just turn it off, the converter on this is integrated into the panel so as you advised I will proceed with caution. This was an excellent catch, you may have saved me a ton of frustration.

Here is the simple diagram

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Old 02-26-2014, 11:21 AM   #13
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IQ4 charging voltage

snip...When I read the owners manual or any of the spec sheets for the DLS-55 the maximum voltage is 13.6 volts...snip

Big Sky,

The IOTA with out IQ4 puts out 13.6, you can get IQ4 integrated or as an add on. On to the base unit if you plug in its included dongle it jumps from 13.6 to 14.2, if you buy the add on module $25 it makes it a smart charger that goes up to 14.8 volts. You can see this in the manual that you linked but they do not make it very clear, check under IQ4 and you will see the volts per cell. At this link it is all more clear http://www.iotaengineering.com/iq.htm I plan on getting the basic unit with the add on module as it will give me more control, 13.6 continuous, 14.2 continuous (manually for limited periods), or intelligent which would be how it is normally connected. May be over thinking this but thought if I have any devices that are sensitive to 14.8 volts being able to set the voltage myself may be helpful.

BTW just saw the pictures of your battery install, that is perfect! Next time in Montana I will give your guy a visit!
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:18 PM   #14
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Quote:
I noticed in another members profile signature that he has a DLS-55, WIbadger. I would guess he could weigh in with some facts on how well the charger works.
Yes, I installed an IOTA DLS-55 with internal IQ4 (purchased thru bestconverter.com). As described by Crabber50, the DLS-55 comes in a couple of different flavors.

The first choice is whether you want a unit that has an external dual voltage jack vs a unit without such a jack. If you opt for the external dual voltage jack unit (IOTA lists this as "DLS-55 (55-amp power converter)"), it comes included with a dual voltage plug (don't confuse this with the external IQ4 plug; they are two different types of plugs). If you don't use the included plug, the unit is a two-stage charger that puts out a max of 13.6V. If you use the included plug, the unit is a two-stage charger that puts out a max of 14.2V, which can be convenient for occasional fast charging. As an extra accessory, you can purchase an external IQ4 plug, which plugs into the same external dual voltage plug. If the external IQ4 plug is employed, the unit becomes a three-stage smart charger, which provides longer and safer use of your batteries.

The second choice is to opt for a unit that has the internal IQ4 (ie, a three-stage smart charger built into the unit) (IOTA lists this as "DLS-55 (55-amp power converter w/IQ4)"). On my unit, there are no external voltage jacks, but if these units have one, the jack will be disabled.

As to which unit to purchase, it all depends upon your anticipated use/needs. A person such as Crabber50 finds it useful to have the ability to switch between a two-stage charger (13.6V or 14.2V) and a three-stage charger (with the external IQ4). I, on the other hand, didn't care for a two-stage charger option, so I opted for the built-in IQ4. (IMHO, it's better to employ a three-stage charger for RV use since it does a better job of properly re-charging batteries). Alternatively, if your TT currently has an IOTA converter w/external dual voltage jack, the purchase of the external IQ4 plug will suffice.

Another issue to consider regarding the IQ4 external vs internal choice is whether you want the ability to monitor the LED indicator light (the LED blinks to indicate which charge mode the DLS unit is currently in (Boost, Absorption, or Float.)). For units with the internal IQ4, the LED indicator lights are affixed to one side of the unit. Depending upon the location of the converter and its mounting orientation, visible access to the LED lights may be obstructed. The external option allows you to monitor the LED indicator light away from the unit. Although seeing the LED status is ďcool,Ē the best solution if you want to do remote monitoring is with a volt meter. Seeing the voltage is more informative than simply seeing if the LED is blinking or not. (I monitor my voltage via a Trimetric battery monitor).

IOTA provides the following specs for units with the IQ4 (external or internal) for 12V battery voltage:

14.8V = Bulk (2.46 VPC)
14.2V = Absorption (2.36 VPC)
13.6V = Float (2.26 VPC)
12.8V = Low trigger
14.6V = High trigger
15.2V = Over voltage fault.

See http://www.iotaengineering.com/pplib/IQ4manual.pdf for details.

I wonít start a flame as to whether the IOTA is better than the Progressive or vice versa. Do a search on rvnet and elsewhere for various opinions. Whichever way you go, know the specifications of your batteries and match with the converter specifications. It is not true to state that
Quote:
14.8 volts is what is needed to fully charge a 12-volt battery.
It all depends upon the specific battery specifications.

For example, I have Interstate GC2-XHD golf cart batteries and the Interstate charging recommendations for these batteries are:

Bulk @ 14.46 (2.41 VPC);
Absorption @ 15.3 (2.55 VPC); and
Float @ 13.4 (2.23 VPC).

Compare these recommended charging specs to those of the IOTA.

Regardless of which converter you choose, your batteries will never see anything above 13V if (a) you have a relatively long circuit and (b) you donít change the 8AWG wiring that is normally used. The problem: voltage drop. If you donít address this issue, you wonít be taking advantage of the charging capabilities for these smart chargers. I swapped out the 8AWG for 4AWG, resulting in less than a 2% voltage drop.

Finally, after three years of use, I have had no problems with my DLS-55. It (quickly) re-charges my batteries to 100% state of charge based upon the reading from the Trimetric monitor.
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Old 02-26-2014, 05:35 PM   #15
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WIBadger,

Thanks for your excellent post, very helpful. did you run 4AWG all the way to the back of the TT and mount the IOTA back there or did you put the IOTA in the front of the TT?

Thinking of installing it in the front either in pass through or under bed. Using 4AWG and leaving the 8AWG going back to the power panel. Will find a way to disconnect the current converter. Likely have to run a dedicated 120v circuit. So either way I am running something.

Thoughts?
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:36 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crabber50 View Post
Next time in Montana I will give your guy a visit!
Absolutely, please do. Cold beer always available! :-)
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Old 02-27-2014, 06:14 AM   #17
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Crabber - This is what I did with my setup. I left my WFCO 8900series Power Distribution Center and WF8945 Converter/charger in place. Then I added the new PD9260C 60AMP Converter/charger and mounted it within 5-feet of my main battery switch. I did upgrade all the wiring associated with the battery bank to 4AWG ANCOR BRAND battery cables and ANCOR brand ring terminals...


I installed a new 120VAC Breaker just for the PD9260C Converter/charger which allows me to use either the WF8945 or PD9260C converter chargers by just turning on the one I wish to use.

The reason I added the PD9260C was to insure I could go to SMART MODE Charging as the WF8945 unit would not ever go into smart mode charging for me. I also needed at least 20 amps of DC current for each of my three GP24 batteries to insure I could re-charge the battery bank to at least a 90% charge state in a quick three hour battery charge period.


Works great for me. In my diagram I am only using the three each Interstate GP24 Batteries (255AHs capacity).. When my 14.4VDC coming from the PD9260C hits the battery bank my DC current jumps up to around 52-53AMPS DC for about 15 minutes and then starts tapering back. It gets to around 8AMPS DC current by the end of a two hour charge run and then the PD9260C drops back to 13.6VDC. The DC current then drops to around 6AMPS DC and continues for another hour and this completes my smart mode 90% charge state for my three GP24 Interstate batteries.

Been using this setup for over five years now mostly camping off the power grid... My key to success is to keep a close monitor on the battery bank DC VOLTAGE level and I have planned out for the day/night run off of the batteries to drop to 12.0VDC around 8AM each morning when I start up my battery bank re-charge bu connecting my shore power cable to my 2KW Generator 120VAC Receptacle using a RV30A-15A long "dogbone" adapter. Doing this allows my on-board PD9260C converter/charger unit re-charge my batteries during a three hour generator run time.

This usually fits into the camp ground generator run time restrictions being allowed to run a generator here on the East side of the US for a couple of hours in the morning and maybe three hours in early evening. I always get my batteries up to their 90% charge state before using them again for the next day/night run fro the batteries. I can do these 50% to 90% charge state cycles for 12-14 times before I usually do a full 100% charge state. Since most camp grounds on the East side will not allow the generator to run this long continuous this is usually when we head for the house and get my 100% charge state done from home. Watching my DC Monitor Panel keeps my batteries performing at their best. They are going on six years now of lots of charge cycles...

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Old 02-27-2014, 07:25 PM   #18
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Roy,

Your diagram and explanation are a great help to me. My current plans and intended use are the same as yours. We have a Honda 2KW, right now 232AH (2 X 6v), can add capacity if we end up needing to. A couple questions to clarify.

Did you make any changes to the way the WF8945 Converter or panel was wired or did you just turn the existing converter breaker off?

Where did you mount your new charger? Currently we have no battery shut off switch so will add them as well as fuses.

Just wondering how far it is from your new converter/charger to the panel and how far from the converter/charger to the batteries.

You used great products I will follow your lead on the Anchor and Blue Sea

Thanks for your help
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Old 02-27-2014, 08:34 PM   #19
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Crabber50 -- Roy has provided excellent, detailed info for your situation (one of these days I'm going to learn how to insert pretty graphics/pics!). One minor point that I'll add pertains to the proper sizing of your converter/charger. In general, it's best to have a charger that is about 25% of your battery bank AH.

In post #15 you asked if I ran "4AWG all the way to the back of the TT and mount the IOTA back there or did you put the IOTA in the front of the TT?"

In my Eagle, the power panel is about 15ft downstream from the (front) battery bank. My DLS-55 is mounted behind the power panel. I ran 4AWG from the battery bank to the DLS-55, then to the power panel, and then back to the battery bank (ie, 4AWG for the entire 30ft circuit). Unlike Roy and Bob (Rustic Eagle), I removed my OEM converter b/c it failed.

You can put your converter/charger anywhere you want. You just need to ensure that you have the proper AWG wiring in regards to the length of the circuit to avoid voltage drop going to your battery bank. However, you will want your inverter as close as possible to your battery bank, having properly sized AWG wiring between the inverter and the battery bank.
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Old 02-28-2014, 11:40 AM   #20
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WIBadger,

With the panel in the back the cable run from the batteries to the panel is about 30'. So thinking I should run 10ga 120 volt circuit to the front pass through and mount the charger there and have a 6' run of 4ga from charger to battery. I would just leave the existing 8ga from batteries to back panel.

Otherwise to limit voltage drop to 2.5% I would have to use 1/0! Not sure of the cost and practicality of that? I have A/C in the pass through now but it part of the GFCI network of outlets and I doubt it would carry a 55amp charger?

What are your thoughts?

Thanks for all of your help!
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