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Old 09-29-2014, 06:39 PM   #11
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There is more than one correct answer. I see several of you have done some googling. lol But there are still other correct answers...
lol you're not the only electrical engineer.

BTW a question for you; what is PIM distortion in a waveguide assembly?
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Old 09-29-2014, 06:45 PM   #12
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Sorry David472, I design computers. I don't do microwaves or transmission lines. lol
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Old 09-29-2014, 06:55 PM   #13
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So, perhaps I'm reading too hard into this, but it seems to me the question is set up to be a joke or a trick question.

How many amps in a volt? A volt-amps worth? A watts worth? (Wattsworth???)
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:29 PM   #14
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It is a trick question and a joke LkptRvPilot. lol. But it happens to have an answer, and more than one.
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:34 PM   #15
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It started out as a joke, but Looks like there may be a technical answer.

Humm! guess jokes on me lol
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:40 PM   #16
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Yo Dude! Watts up?
Answering the same question regarding volts over two times...
is revolting!!!
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:41 PM   #17
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There is more than one correct answer. I see several of you have done some googling. lol But there are still other correct answers...
Well? wow us
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:47 PM   #18
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Well? wow us
he can't.....his googles' down
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Old 09-29-2014, 07:55 PM   #19
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Watt?
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Old 09-29-2014, 08:21 PM   #20
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Amps are how many electrons flow past a certain point per second. It is equal to one coulomb of charge per second, or 6.24 x 10^18 electrons per second. Volts is a measure of how much force that each electron is under, which we call "potential". Power (watts) is volts times amps. A few electrons under a lot of potential can supply a lot of power, or a lot of electrons at a low potential can supply the same power. Think of water in a hose. A gallon a minute (think amps) just dribbles out if it is under low pressure (think low voltage). But if you restrict the end of the hose, letting the pressure build up, the water can have more power (like watts), even though it is still only one gallon a minute. In fact the power can grow enormous as the pressure builds, to the point that a water knife can cut a sheet of glass. In the same manner as the voltage is increased a small amount of current can turn into a lot of watts.
This is also why increasing the volts does not necessarily increase the available power. Power is amps times volts, so if you double the volts you halve the amps unless something in your circuit actually creates power, such as a battery, solar panel or nuclear power plant.
One answer which is closest I suppose to the one posed (Amps = Volts) is through the use of Ohm's law: V = IR or I=V/R where I is the current through the conductor in units of amperes, V is the potential difference measured across the conductor in units of volts, and R is the resistance of the conductor in units of ohms. More specifically, Ohm's law states that the R in this relation is constant, independent of the current. This means for example that if R = 1 and V = 1 then I = 1. So, V = I or 1 amp = 1 volt where the resistance = 1 ohm.
Another way to look at it is in some engineering disciplines the volts are more or less fixed in the equation P = VI where P = Power in watts, for example in house wiring, automotive wiring, or telephone wiring. In these fields technicians often have charts that relate amps to watts and this has caused some confusion. What these charts should be titled is "conversion of amps to watts at a fixed voltage of 110 volts" or "conversion of watts to amps at 13.8 volts," etc. Doing the math I = P/V. So we have power as a constant or variable instead of resistance.
There are other ways to look at it using coulombs etc. But the point is if one uses a constant such as household volts i.e. 110v or voltage of an automotive battery 13.6v as is common practice then there is an answer to Amps = Volts albeit extrapolated or based on assumption of constants.
Again, one can simply convert amps to volts at a fixed resistance or wattage.
I hope that is enough as my brain hurts... lol
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