Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-18-2016, 11:59 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 521
Plug and patch tire?

So I have a very slow leak in one of my trailer tires. The tire has less than 1,000 miles on it. Today I took the tire off of the trailer and found a very small screw had gotten in between the tread in the center of the tire. Nowhere near the sidewall. Normally I would have a new tire put on the rim. In this case because the screw is so small, in the center of the tread and as far away from the sidewall as can be I am thinking of just plugging and patching it. I'd like to have some thoughts and input from others who may have a little knowledge or experience here. Thoughts?????
__________________

__________________
Mike
'13 Ford F 150, FX4 Off Road, Ecoboost
'15 Jayco Jay Feather X213 BH
micron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 12:14 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
dalebra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Waconia, MN
Posts: 433
Quote:
Originally Posted by micron View Post
So I have a very slow leak in one of my trailer tires. The tire has less than 1,000 miles on it. Today I took the tire off of the trailer and found a very small screw had gotten in between the tread in the center of the tire. Nowhere near the sidewall. Normally I would have a new tire put on the rim. In this case because the screw is so small, in the center of the tread and as far away from the sidewall as can be I am thinking of just plugging and patching it. I'd like to have some thoughts and input from others who may have a little knowledge or experience here. Thoughts?????
I have always had very good luck in plugging this type of leak in my car tires.
__________________

__________________
2015 Chevy Silverado 2500HD CC Duramax
2016 Eagle 323LKTS Java
Pull Rite SuperGlide #4100 Hitch w/Mor-Ryde Pin Box
dalebra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 12:20 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Force's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Rochester, MA
Posts: 378
X2 on plugging, have done that at least half a dozen times on car & truck tires, all lasted for thousands of miles after plugging. Can't say I've ever done that on a trailer tire, but I can't imagine the results would differ.

EDIT: Keeping a tire repair kit in your truck is a must have as well
__________________
Tom
2017 F250 Lariat Super Duty Crew Cab, 4x4, 6.7L Power Stroke
2016 Jayco Eagle HT 29.5 BHDS

Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 01:16 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: AZ, USA, Earth
Posts: 1,342
When I briefly worked at a service station back in the mid '70s, we started fixing tires by using a mushroom shaped plug that was inserted with an air gun while the tire was still mounted.. We would ream out the hole with a skinny rasp slathered with rubber cement, slather the cement on the plug and stick it in the gun, push the tip of the gun at the opening of the hole (we kept the rasp poked in the hole until just before we put the gun against it to ensure we could find it, then shot the air to it. We guaranteed those for the life of the tire and never had one come back on us.


I've had excellent luck in the past using nylon reinforced string plugs without breaking down the tire. There was a bit of skill required to put them in properly, though. Nowadays, I'm too old to horse with it, not to mention I haven't had a flat, or even a slow leak, in over a decade.
__________________
Jeannie
Lady Fitzgerald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 02:35 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Elizabethtown, PA
Posts: 1,542
I know this will cause some responses Years ago when working in a Service Station in Tulsa Ok. I was taught to repair tires by using a patch on the inside of the tire. I questioned this as I also had seen plugs being used. The reason this station used patches was explained that the air is on the inside of a tire and it pushes against the patch and creates a better seal. Of course that was back in the 1970's and plugs and repairs are much improved Also using a plug takes less time to install than using a patch.
__________________
2004 Jay Feather 25E
2001 Ford Expedition 4X4 EB 5.4 3.55 rear
2004 Ford Expedition 4X4 EB 5.4 3.73 rear
bedrck46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 10:50 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: AZ, USA, Earth
Posts: 1,342
Quote:
Originally Posted by bedrck46 View Post
I know this will cause some responses Years ago when working in a Service Station in Tulsa Ok. I was taught to repair tires by using a patch on the inside of the tire. I questioned this as I also had seen plugs being used. The reason this station used patches was explained that the air is on the inside of a tire and it pushes against the patch and creates a better seal. Of course that was back in the 1970's and plugs and repairs are much improved Also using a plug takes less time to install than using a patch.
Patches are still superior to most plugs. Most of the better tire chains, such as Discount Tires, will only use patches to repair a puncture. Before the service station I worked at (back in '72, btw) got the mushroom plugs and insertion tool, we used full sized patches that had a plug stem on them. We had to break down the tire, then, after grinding the area the patch would cover and applying rubber cement, we would push a tool into the puncture from the outside and use it to pull the stem through the hole. We would then stitch down the patch like any other patch. Those were probably the best patches I ever saw but they were more work to apply.

Plugs allow you to fix a puncture without dismounting the tire from the rim but you have to use high quality plugs and know how to install them properly. Sadly, there are a lot of crap plugs and tools out there. Once I worked out how to properly install plugs and found which plugs worked best, I never had a plug fail even though they are supposed to be a temporary repair only.
__________________
Jeannie
Lady Fitzgerald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 11:02 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
havnfun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Grants, New Mexico
Posts: 2,635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Patches are still superior to most plugs. Most of the better tire chains, such as Discount Tires, will only use patches to repair a puncture. Before the service station I worked at (back in '72, btw) got the mushroom plugs and insertion tool, we used full sized patches that had a plug stem on them. We had to break down the tire, then, after grinding the area the patch would cover and applying rubber cement, we would push a tool into the puncture from the outside and use it to pull the stem through the hole. We would then stitch down the patch like any other patch. Those were probably the best patches I ever saw but they were more work to apply.

Plugs allow you to fix a puncture without dismounting the tire from the rim but you have to use high quality plugs and know how to install them properly. Sadly, there are a lot of crap plugs and tools out there. Once I worked out how to properly install plugs and found which plugs worked best, I never had a plug fail even though they are supposed to be a temporary repair only.
Thanks. So where do you get the "high quality plug", and what's it called?
I need some in my tool box for sure but hope I never have to use it. lol
Happy RVing,
Jeff
__________________
2014 Jayflight 24FBS Elite. 2009 F150 Supercab UNICORN, 5.4L ,3.73, HD/Max Tow Package, Equal-i-zer 1K,
Progressive EMS-LCHW30, TST 507RV TPMS, Hydro Life HL-200, Maxxis 8008.
Best friend wife, Di, and dog Cooper. RETIRED 6/30/16. WOOHOO!
havnfun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2016, 11:32 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Worcester
Posts: 931
I had a few in my years of driving. All the auto stores carry them. Amazon sells them to. They're called 'tire plug kits' googling will return many choices.
__________________
2016 Jay Flight 38FDDS
jloco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2016, 12:31 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Morris
Posts: 250
I have plugged a lot of car tires with out a failure over the years. Even plugged a couple of MC tires that were almost brand new. Ran them till the tread was down to the wear bars. Never had one of them fail. PS don't tell any other bikers though.
__________________
Retired and loving it.
Got a new 2014 Grayhawk 31DS
Hoping to get away from the IL winters
MadDad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2016, 05:29 AM   #10
Site Team
 
norty1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 12,046
I would have it broken down and patched from the inside. To much flexing on a camper tire to make me comfortable with it. Most tire shops now days that warranty their work will not plug any tire.

If you have ever been stuck on the side of a road, you know the feeling you have.
__________________

__________________
Moderator
2011 351RLTS Eagle, Mor/Ryde suspension & pin box
06 F350 Lariat PSD, SRW, LB, CC, EGR delete kit, 16K DrawTite hitch, Timbrens, TST TPMS

Can't find what you're looking on JOF? Try:Jayco Owners Forum Custom Google Search
"It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled." - Mark Twain
norty1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.