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Old 05-10-2015, 07:10 PM   #1
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Scan gage set for transmission temp, now what?

just running a short highway stint this afternoon, I saw a high of 190ish. What is an acceptable range and when do I need to pull over and let her cool off?
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Old 05-10-2015, 08:43 PM   #2
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I was told by a transmission shop to never let it get to 220 degrees
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Old 05-10-2015, 08:50 PM   #3
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Depends on your brand and model. But generally cooler is better. Much over 225 and most fluids start to breakdown. My suburban stays between 170 and 190 most of the time. I have seen 210. My Escape though stays between 190 and 210. I have seen 220. Both of these are dependant on load and weather temps, etc. To get brand and model specifics you can find info on the web or contact a local dealer. With my 2 vehicles I can watch the temps and see when the thermostat opens and closes on the coolers. It never stays on the high end for long. My Escape runs everything hotter. My coolant temp normal is 212 to 215. But under increased pressure this is normal.
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:07 PM   #4
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The chart above provides a graphic illustration of just how devastating excessive heat is to the life expectancy of an automatic transmission. The general rule of thumb is that for each 20 to 25 degree increase in temperature the transmission's life expectancy is cut in half. Keeping your transmission cool is the key to longevity.

Transmission and Transaxle
Heat Temperature Failure Chart
175 Degrees: 100,000+ miles (Normal is typically 179 to 195 degrees)
200 Degrees: 90,000 miles
225 Degrees: 55,000 miles (Pressure Drops)
250 Degrees: 25,000 miles (Valves Stick)
275 Degrees: 17,000 miles (Varnish Forms)
300 Degrees: 4,000 miles (Seals & Clutches Burn)
325 Degrees: TRANSMISSION FAILURE
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:54 PM   #5
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Nice chart, Jim. It puts it all out front for us to see (and worry?).
Does it help if you change tranny fluid more often than the manual states?
Happy RVing,
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:36 PM   #6
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Personally, I will have the transmission fluid changed every time it gets hot. For awhile, that was two to three times per year when I was pulling with a ford van in WVA. It would see 250 on long climbs in second gear. I noticed that once the fluid got hot once that the temp never seemed to stay down after that. Expensive on the frequent changes, but I have a stock Ford 4R100 with 156,000 trouble free miles behind a tuned 7.3 (knock on wood). I would change it any time it has been hot.
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:37 PM   #7
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My understanding is that if you get up into the 200+ range, that the fluid viscosity deteriorates and looses effectiveness, so,yes, replacing becomes critical.
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:38 PM   #8
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Agreed Jmooney. That is my understanding as well
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by havnfun View Post
Nice chart, Jim. It puts it all out front for us to see (and worry?).
Does it help if you change tranny fluid more often than the manual states?
Happy RVing,
Jeff
I shouldn't take credit for this, I pulled it from a tranny website
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:43 PM   #10
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Most HD trucks have transmission fluid coolers now. My 2015 Ram does, but I keep the tranny temp as a primary guage up on my display just in case.
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