Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-15-2015, 11:08 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
jsallman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Ames
Posts: 279
Half ton enhancements - Whats next

Hello all.

I have posted a few posts already regarding this. I have a 2013 F150 Supercrew with Maxtow, pulling a 2016 Jayco 29BHDS, which has a GVWR of 9750 and unloaded weight of around 7705 lbs (per the trailer sticker). My payload is 1832 on the door sticker on the TV. Towing limit is 11,200LBS. I have not yet visited the CAT scales, intend to soon. I know I will be close but as long as the TV isnt heavily loaded, I think I will be within the limits.

I have thought about upgrading to a 3/4 ton, however I need one thats no longer than the 145" wheelbase F150 SCREW and has the same size back seat for both the family hauling AND fitting in my garage, such a truck does not seem to exist today.

I have added roadmaster active suspension to the rear springs, it made a WORLD of difference in towing. I know that the factory shocks and factory P rated tires (don't get me started) are also pretty high up on the priority list to change.

Since the suspension upgrade, I occasionally notice some harmonic bounce on newer pavement, changing speed corrects this. This harmonic bounce was much worse before the upgrade. Mileage seems marginally better. Large bumps seem to bounce the TV a few times.

I have just over 30k miles on the TV. What would you all recommend the next upgrade I do is to improve the towing. Shocks or LT E-Rated tires? I am planning on a 15 hour tow from central Iowa to Dallas in October so I would like to do 1 of those 2 by then, but probably not both. I am leaning towards the shocks to try to get some more miles out of the tires, but am open to suggestions.

Appreciate your insight.
__________________

__________________
2016 Jayflight 29BHDS
2015 Ram 2500 Laramie Crew Cab - 6.4 Hemi
2013 Ford F150 Supercrew EcoBoost, MaxTow (Loved and Sold)

Equal-i-zer Weight distribution system
jsallman1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2015, 11:23 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kelowna, BC Canada
Posts: 215
my personal opinion would be to go with the LT tires. in E load range. It doesn't matter what enhancements you do to the truck. it is still a 1/2 ton and your towing experience will never be as good as with a 3/4 or 1 ton truck. especially with your size of trailer. i wish i could give you better news. the upgrades you are making will make the drive better, but you will never be "comfortable" towing your trailer with the 1/2 ton. JMHO.

Happy Camping.
__________________

__________________
'07 Chevrolet Silverado 3500HD XC LB SRW 4X2.
Powerstop Brakes on all corners.
'15 JayFlight 28BHBE Elite Fibreglass
Andersen Hitch.
'07 Northern Lite 10-2RR Camper.
SuperSprings.
Northern Jay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 06:46 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Detroit
Posts: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Jay View Post
my personal opinion would be to go with the LT tires. in E load range.

X2
I wouldn't think upgrading stock shocks with only 30k on them will change your towing experience much.
__________________
2005 Ford Excursion 6.8L, 3.73
2016 Eagle 324BHTS, P3, PP 3P

jasoncw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 07:00 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Silver Spring, MD
Posts: 1,068
I agree with NJ... tires will give you the biggest bang for the buck here. What you need to remember is that a harsher ride is a side effect of a stiffer suspension. You want the stiffer suspension to handle the heavier weight.

I would guess your tongue weight to be 1200-1300 lbs, which still leaves about 600 lbs for family and gear. Not sure how many family members you have and what they weigh... but it is conceivable that you could stay under your weight ratings even with that big and heavy of a trailer.

Be mindful of your axle ratings and don't go over those. Make sure your WDH is properly set up and pushing weight around to the front. I would strongly encourage you to get weighed. That will let you know if you are carrying too much in the truck, or on one axle.

When we bought our new Jayco we towed with our Tundra. On paper the numbers worked out. Then I realized we were carrying too much *stuff* in the truck. Ended up just putting the kids and the dogs in the backseat and EVERYTHING else in the trailer (have something like 2300 lbs CCC in the trailer). Even then, with the low payload on the Tundra we were overweight (under axle ratings, but overweight). I ended up buying a Ram 2500.

I wouldn't worry so much about fitting the truck in the garage. Its a truck... they were meant to live outside. Mine is parked under a dirty tree and its always filthy. Its a truck! We probably drive 4000 to 5000 miles a year pulling the trailer (one big trip to Florida every winter) and I was just not feeling comfortable about being over my weight limits in the Tundra. Bumped up to a diesel 3/4 ton and bought another 1000 lbs of payload, bigger backseat, better gas mileage and a LOT more towing power and capability. It sucked trading in a paid off truck and taking on payments again... but I got a much better tow rig.
spoon059 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2015, 08:54 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
jsallman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Ames
Posts: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by spoon059 View Post
I agree with NJ... tires will give you the biggest bang for the buck here. What you need to remember is that a harsher ride is a side effect of a stiffer suspension. You want the stiffer suspension to handle the heavier weight.

I would guess your tongue weight to be 1200-1300 lbs, which still leaves about 600 lbs for family and gear. Not sure how many family members you have and what they weigh... but it is conceivable that you could stay under your weight ratings even with that big and heavy of a trailer.

Be mindful of your axle ratings and don't go over those. Make sure your WDH is properly set up and pushing weight around to the front. I would strongly encourage you to get weighed. That will let you know if you are carrying too much in the truck, or on one axle.

When we bought our new Jayco we towed with our Tundra. On paper the numbers worked out. Then I realized we were carrying too much *stuff* in the truck. Ended up just putting the kids and the dogs in the backseat and EVERYTHING else in the trailer (have something like 2300 lbs CCC in the trailer). Even then, with the low payload on the Tundra we were overweight (under axle ratings, but overweight). I ended up buying a Ram 2500.

I wouldn't worry so much about fitting the truck in the garage. Its a truck... they were meant to live outside. Mine is parked under a dirty tree and its always filthy. Its a truck! We probably drive 4000 to 5000 miles a year pulling the trailer (one big trip to Florida every winter) and I was just not feeling comfortable about being over my weight limits in the Tundra. Bumped up to a diesel 3/4 ton and bought another 1000 lbs of payload, bigger backseat, better gas mileage and a LOT more towing power and capability. It sucked trading in a paid off truck and taking on payments again... but I got a much better tow rig.
Yeah, my garage thing is mostly preference. Fortunately my HOA doesn't mandate vehicles be in the garage (there are a few around here that do). Its my daily driver however, so I would rather just not deal with scraping windows and brushing snow in the winter. Also would rather keep it out of the hail in the spring. I have my Jayco stored indoors about 4 miles away in a farm shed, that cant be kept in my yard do to HOA covenants. I have about 246" max length in the garage, the TV I have is 244". I literally bump the front wall to get the door shut the way it is if I have a drawbar in. The smallest 3/4 ton supercrew I have found is the GM products, but they are 249", I really don't think I would get the door shut.

I am hoping the new models of the F250/350 coming out might have the same cab length as I have, but I doubt it as it wouldn't be in demand, and isn't really much good for 5th wheels with a 5.5' bed. I also frankly hope they decide to put the same ecoboost 3.5 twin turbo engine, or perhaps a twin turbo V8 into the F250 to give more torque without the $ of the diesels. If they did that I would seriously consider a trade.

I appreciate the insight, I will probably look to the tires next (after I verify some weights).
__________________
2016 Jayflight 29BHDS
2015 Ram 2500 Laramie Crew Cab - 6.4 Hemi
2013 Ford F150 Supercrew EcoBoost, MaxTow (Loved and Sold)

Equal-i-zer Weight distribution system
jsallman1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 05:12 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Northern Michigan
Posts: 91
I would upgrade tires first then, look into airbags & Billstein shocks.
Pcschwenke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 06:17 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 41
Tires are definitely the way to go!
T bone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 07:18 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
TWP723's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Abingdon
Posts: 3,597
I agree with everyone else. Stiffer sidewall tires should help. As far as Ford's trucks, the shortest WB for a crew cab SuperDuty is 156". I assume you need the crew cab for family. Shortest super cab short bed (half door) is 142". Shortest bed is 6.5'.
__________________
2013 Jayco Eagle 328 RLTS
2013 Ford F350 6.7L 4x4 CCLB
W/Air Lift air bags (front & rear)
Equal-I-Zerô WDH
Me, Momma and Charles (RIP buddy)
And introducing Sofie!! ;)
TWP723 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 12:36 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Salem
Posts: 324
A 1/2 ton is a 1/2 ton period. But, you can improve them somewhat. From personal experience I can say that it will never tow like a 3/4 ton. Not even close.
I had a 2010 F150 with Max Tow and 1857lbs for payload. Same 145" WB you have. I also added the RAS to it. I added Michelin E rated tires and Rancho 9000 shocks.
I towed a 31' TT @7300lbs loaded. With a bed cap and the truck bed full of gear along with a 950lb TW I was right at the RAWR of 4050. I scaled it several times and always came in at 7600lbs (GVW 7650) and 4000 on the rear (4050 RAWR).
I went with the E Mich only because Discount tire had a really good deal going. I ran them at 40psi unloaded and 50psi loaded. You don't need to run 80 psi in them as the load rating at lower psi is plenty for the F150. That was from Discount.
I found the RAS to be adequate, but having Firestone air bags on a previous F150 I wish I would've went that route. Oh well.
I found the jump from the P rated tires to the E rated tires to be marginal. D rated would be the better route to go. Cheaper.
The Rancho 9000 shocks did the most to help with ride quality when towing.
With that being said on the previous F150 (2008) I installed Bilsteins 4600 shocks. Those along with the air bags gave the truck the best ride. I also installed some D rated Cooper tires. Although I was towing a shorter lighter TT the empty ride was way nicer on the 08.
If it were me I would get the bags, 4600 Bilsteins and D rated tires.


Reason I recommend the Bilstein over the Rancho is I feel they're better made. I had two Ranchos fail in just 1.5 years. Sure they're warranted for life but you still have to get them installed. The rears are easy but the fronts sucks.


As far as replacing the shocks or the tires 1st? That's a tough question. Regardless of how many miles are on the shocks, OEM shocks aren't as good a an upgrade to Bilstein or SOB.
P rated tires are great for a soft ride. You will get a little harsher ride going to D or E tires. Not much harsher but you'll def notice it.
If it were me I'd make sure my P's were maxed to 44psi and then I'd get new 4600 Bilsteins. The 4600's will provide better rebound control over the OEM shocks.
FWIW though, all theses upgrades are going to just give you a marginal increase each time. I moved up to a Ram 2500 with the TT I had and it was the biggest jump. Far more solid towing experience. Of course going from a 145" WB to a 169" WB didn't hurt. That and another 2000lbs for the trucks weight (Cummins included) really gave the whole setup a solid feel.


JMO but you've really got too much TT for a 1/2 ton. Even though Ford rates it around 11,000lbs, it's the 34', 8200-8500lbs and 11' hgt together that overwhelms the F150.
I think if you were towing 8-9000lbs of firewood on a lower profile trailer that's also shorter with a 10% tongue weight the overall towing experience would be totally different. You've got a huge heavy box behind you that's pushing and pulling on every bump as well as when the wind hits it's moving the truck around.
If you ever hit the scales I'd bet you're over either the or the RAWR/GVW.
goducks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 01:40 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Calgary
Posts: 796
I think shocks would improve things more than E rated tires. Most factory shocks are not very good. I have considered upgrading the shocks on our new F250 even though we only have around 14k kms on it.
__________________

__________________
2014 Jayco Swift 281BHS, 300W Solar!
2015 F250 XLT 4x4 Crew Cab, Short box, 6.2 gas
Subaru297 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.