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Old 07-23-2014, 05:14 PM   #1
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Payload an issue?


Hello all,

This is my first post ~ your help would be greatly appreciated.My tow vehicle is a 2006 Ram 2500 5.9 diesel Megacab 2WD SLT.Specs say my max trail is 12,900 and max tow vehicle payload is 2,040.

We are set to purchase a 2015 Jayco 32TSBH, weight completed at factory w full propane tanks:8,440

From reading the forums I have gathered that, to establish my payload I need to add the estimated hitch weight of the trailer + everyone + everything that I put in the truck during tow.

Here's what I came up with:

8,440 dry + 1000 lbs in trailer = 9500 lb trailer when loaded
Estimated hitch weight = .15 x 9500
Estimated hitch weight = 1,425

Weight of my family of six = 645 lb (myself, wife, children ages 11, 7, 4, and 2)

If I've figured this correctly my payload with just the estimated tongue/hitch weight and my family is 1,425 + 645 = 2,070

That means the payload of the truck will be exceeded by 30 lbs !!!!???and I havn't even accounted for anything else I want to put in the truck besides my family (and the kids have plenty of growth yet).

Does this mean I need to get a 3500 to do this (payload of the 2006 3500 is an additional 800 lbs over the 2500).

Thanks in advance for your advice!
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Old 07-23-2014, 06:26 PM   #2
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I would think that your estimated hitch weight is a tad high. Your dry hitch weight is listed as #825. I would doubt that it will exceed #1100, assuming you don't carry a whole load of water.

My hitch weight is a little over 11%

Welcome to the forum. There is a wealth of information about this in the towing section
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Old 07-23-2014, 06:41 PM   #3
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I believe a weight distribution hitch will distribute some of the hitch weight back onto the trailer axles.

Also, it sounds stupid, you could load heavier stuff into back of the trailer to distribute the weight better. 1000 lbs in trailer is a lot of stuff. Probably wouldn't hit that with clothes, food, and outside gear. I could be wrong though. You would easily hit it if you hauled it with a full load of fresh water, which is normally not required or advised.

I wouldn't worry a out it too much. That 15% is an estimate anyway. If all of that fully loaded puts you within 30 lbs of payload, I personally would assume that you over killed it a little and stick with your truck. That truck will do a great job of pulling that trailer. In my job, everything is about weight, and they are all estimates anyways. "Close enough for government work." I'm sure there are many that will disagree with me though.
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Old 07-23-2014, 06:59 PM   #4
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15% tongue weight sounds high. I aim for 12-13% if I can. 12% of 9500 lbs is 1140, so that gives you 300 lbs back. Unless you are taking super long trips with a lot of supplies, 1000 lbs of stuff in the camper should be everything you need to bring with you.

Remember, any weight in the truck is 100% weight against payload. Any weight in trailer is 12-15% weight against payload. Load up the camper... but don't overload your axles or tires!
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:20 PM   #5
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I disagree with decreasing the tongue weight for payload spec purposes. A trailer that long will tow much better the closer you get to 15%.

I do agree that most of your gear should go in the trailer. And with that being said, how do all of you fit in that truck?! Is there even any room in the cab for gear? Perhaps consider taking 2 vehicles? Then you can load up the tow mule as much as you want and everyone has plenty of breathing room.

I'm surprised it hasn't been suggested yet, but take the truck with the clan and a normal full load over a scale and see exactly what you're working with. And I would stay closer to 15% for tongue wt estimates, IMHO
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:30 PM   #6
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I believe the only difference is the springs. I think the rear end housing is the same
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:58 PM   #7
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I believe you need to include the weight of your fuel as well. I say this a lot, but my suggestion is load the tribe into the truck, fuel up and hit the closest CAT scale. You will then know how the front/rear axles are loaded. That will let you know how much you can put on the hitch (Rear GAWR - GAW). Don't forget to subtract the weight of the WDH from that as well.
I see that "Camper" has also made this suggestion.
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Old 07-23-2014, 08:22 PM   #8
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Feelgood,

Welcome to JOF

If you haven't purchased the TT yet, take you RAM 2500 to a CAT scale under loaded conditions (full fuel, passengers, and simulated camping cargo) and weigh it. Subtract the CAT scale weight from the GVWR noted on your driver's door....., the remaining weight is the available payload capacity for a TT's loaded tongue weight, and a WDH (about 50lbs). This simple process takes the guess work out of the equation, work with real weights whenever possible.

The specific 32TSBH (10,500lb GVWR) your looking at has a factory ship weight of 8,440lbs (yellow sticker)...., I agree with your estimate of 1,000lbs for cargo, battery, etc. (no full fluids) = 9,500lbs

I also agree with your 15% tongue weight factor, but nothing less then 13% on a heavy TT that is almost 36ft long....., so a desired 1,235lb to 1,425lb loaded tongue weight range is what you should be working with (w/ 9,500lb TT). If you plan to travel with a full fresh water tank, all weights will increase accordingly.

If you already have the TT, then take the loaded TV/TT combo to a CAT scale and perform a complete weigh-in.....; CAT scale TV/TT how-to:

https://www.jaycoowners.com/forums/f37/how-to-weigh-your-tv-tt-3871.html

Also, insure the selected WDH rating will support the loaded tongue weight value (or targeted loaded weight range).

My Eagle 278FBS (30ft long) loaded weighs 8,400lbs, my loaded tongue weight is just under 1,300lbs (15%), and I use a Reese HP Dual Cam WDH rated at 1,500lbs.

Hope this helps

Bob
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:40 PM   #9
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Thank you all for your quick responses! I was hoping my newbie math and rationale was correctish enough. I have been pouring over threads off and on for several months.

I'm thinking most folks don't have to worry so much about payload because they don't pile six people into the tow vehicle. What had me concerned is that the weight of my family over the next several years will increase substantially, and if I'm at or near my max tow vehicle payload already, might as well start looking for a 3500 now.

My estimated tongue weight is probably a bit high but the 32TSBH we're getting is heavy, and has a thermal package and second AC unit...more weight...

I pulled my tow vehicle specs from:

http://www.media.chrysler.com/dcxms/...gaCabSpecs.pdf

I think the max payload of the 2500 diesel is surprisingly low because of the weight of the motor. Fortunately I got a good deal (not great but good) on the 2006 2500, mileage is at 64,000. I've checked on prices of the 2006 3500s out there of the same trim and I think I may be able to trade straight up for one that has a few more miles on it, maybe 90-100k miles.

Here's my plan: Throw the WD hitch that I ordered into the back of the truck, fill her with fuel and family and weigh her. Have the RV dealership determine the trailer's actual tongue weight as is. And get back to you guys.

Since we ordered the travel trailer and love the floor plan and amenities, will buy it and use our current tow vehicle but travel light(er) and local (maybe use a second vehicle) until I find a 3500 that I can trade out.

Two more questions:

1) Was the 1500 WD hitch the better option over the 1000 (ordered a Blue Ox Sway Pro)?
2) Are the tires that come on these new travel trailers, especially on a really heavy one like this, reliable or are there immediate upgrade options that I should consider?
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Old 07-24-2014, 12:38 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by feelgood View Post
snip.....1) Was the 1500 WD hitch the better option over the 1000 (ordered a Blue Ox Sway Pro)?
A 1,000lb rated WDH is underrated for the 32TSBH under loaded conditions, IMO a 1,400lb rated WDH would be the minimum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by feelgood View Post
snip.... 2) Are the tires that come on these new travel trailers, especially on a really heavy one like this, reliable or are there immediate upgrade options that I should consider?
In most cases the tires are rated to carry the loaded weight of the TT "less" the tongue weight. Reliability of the OEM tires IMO have a lot to do with how they are maintained...., BUT, I don't like cutting the tire load rating that close so I upgraded the load rating on my TT from a "C" to an "E". I also like the fact that the higher load rated tires have stiffer sidewall construction.

Bob
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