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Old 05-17-2016, 09:50 PM   #1
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PU truck to tow a 10,000 lb GVWR RV!

I notice GM & Ford will only put a 3.73 rear axle in their T PUs(pickups). A 4.10 rear axle would better for towing. Chevy does have two V8s, that have good power & torque, yet get pretty good MPG. The 5.3L (355 hp & 383 ft-lb) & the 6.2L (420 hp & 460 ft-lb torque) The 6.2L gets EPA MPG of 15 City & 21 hwy. Torque of 460 ft-lb & a 4.10 rear end should be able to tow way more than 10K. Giving me a safety margin.

I have researched the Toyota Tundra, w/5.7L V8 (381 hp & 401 ft-lb), using a 4.30 rear end. It's rated to tow 10,200 lb. When a 2500 Chevy Silverado w/6.0L V8 (360 hp & 380 ft-lb), using a 4.10 rear end, is rated to tow 14,500 lbs. The Chevy also has a curb weight of almost 1K lb more. Another difference is the Chevy has a bigger payload.

Ratings below are from GM's & Toyota's web sites (I have also doubled checked w/other sources):

2016 Chevy T Reg Cab, Long Box RWD, 6L V8 (360 hp & 380 ft-lb torque)
Curb Weight 5817 lbs, Max Payload 3534 lbs, Max GVWR 9300 lbs
Max Conventional Trailering, w/4.10 Rear Axle 14,500 lb & max 5th Wheel Trailering, 14,800 lbs

2016 Tundra Reg Cab, Long Box 2WD, 5.7L V8 (381 hp & 401 ft-lb torque)
Curb Weight 4940 Max Payload 2060 Max tow cap, 10,500 lb (4.3 rear gears & towing package)

Nissan has a new Titan PU coming out soon. Tow cap is 12,300 lb. So, that would also do the job I would think. But, it will be a while until the price of the new Titan settles down and that start putting them on sale. One of the disadvantages of T is that I would have to pay near MSRP. They are never run as loss leader specials, like T PUs. Rebates & other incentives are offered on T PUs. But, not near as often & not as much as on T PUs. Anyone have any other suggestions?
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:53 PM   #2
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I may be missing a piece, but are you asking which of these trucks would be best to use for a 10k RV or just posting some findings?

You may not load to the full 10k. That GM 6.2 is a beast.
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:55 PM   #3
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No where near an expert on this but I was shopping the same way back in Mar. Went with the 2015 silvy 2500hd duramax. The 15's have higher rated tow weights.
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Old 05-17-2016, 10:02 PM   #4
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Your only looking at one part of the key to good towing. Tow capacity is one, but cargo capacity is another. A 10K TT will have a tongue weight of about 1200 - 1500 typically. I love my Tundra and it is equipped for 10,100 lb towing, but, the cargo capacity is about 1500 Lbs. You need to add, fuel, cargo, passengers and tongue weight of the trailer to see where your at. AT 10K I think your outside of any 1/2 capacity. I would NEVER want to tow anything much heavier then my 7,000 lb TT (loaded) with it.

Your not alone in looking at tow capacity and forgetting looking at cargo capacity and total gross weight your truck can handle.

Good luck and happy camping !
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Old 05-17-2016, 10:12 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smurfs_of_war View Post
I may be missing a piece, but are you asking which of these trucks would be best to use for a 10k RV or just posting some findings?

You may not load to the full 10k. That GM 6.2 is a beast.
I was just wondering if anyone knew why, the Tundra w/401 ft-lb of torque
and a 4.30 rear axle, is rated below, a GM truck w/380 ft-lb of torque and a
4.10 rear axle. All other factors being the same more torque and a high axle
ratio, generally means a greater ability to tow an RV.

As far as the full 10K. It gets that heavy w/full tank of water & LP etc. I
want a 20% safety margin. Also, the GM 6.2L maybe a beast, but you can't
get it in a regular PU. You have to buy a more expensive crew cab, in order
to get one. That would cost as much as the T (2500) Reg Cab.
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Old 05-17-2016, 10:38 PM   #6
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The Tundra is rated below the GM because none of the other factors are the same. You're comparing a 1/2 ton to a 3/4 ton. The frame, brakes, transmission, axles, etc are all heavier duty. It's not just engine and axle ratio that determine everything.

I would actually suggest looking at newer used 3/4 ton gas models if you're looking to stay gas. They are generally significantly cheaper than their diesel counterparts and will give you the added stability that moving from a 1/2 ton to a 3/4 ton provides. For that matter, check out the 1 ton gas models as well. The difference between the 3/4 and 1 ton is very negligible and you'll have more cargo capacity should you ever decide to go bigger in the future.
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Old 05-17-2016, 11:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DogFather View Post
I was just wondering if anyone knew why, the Tundra w/401 ft-lb of torque
and a 4.30 rear axle, is rated below, a GM truck w/380 ft-lb of torque and a
4.10 rear axle. All other factors being the same more torque and a high axle
ratio, generally means a greater ability to tow an RV.
But all the other factors are not the same. You need to factor in the transmission gearing as well.

While this was for the GMT-900 1500 (GM '07-'13), which truck (both with the same 5.3) would you guess has the better towing combo, a 4spd/ 4.10 combo or a 6spd/3.42 combo? It may be hard to believe, but the 6spd/3.42 combo is actually better, and has a higher tow rating (still have 1500 payload issue though as mentioned!!!) due to the gearing in the transmission. I will try to find it, but I believe I have posted the GM gear ratio chart comparing the 4 sped vs 6 sped combos a member over on GM-Trucks.com made.

Hopefully this link works:GM 4spd vs 6spd chart. As I mentioned, this was made for the GMT 900 1500 trucks comparing the two transmissions.

That size trailer, myself, I would ot want to tow with a 1500. As mentioned, all the passengers, all cargo (coolers, firewood, bikes, etc), any accessories added to the truck (truck cap/topper, step bars, bed liner, etc, the wdh (weight distribution hitch), AND the tt tw (travel trailer tongue weight) ALL count toward the trucks payload. And for a safe, stable tow you generally need 12-15% tw of the loaded trailer. For a 10k lbs trailer, as mentioned, that is 1200-1500lbs. Most 1500 trucks today are lucky to have 1500-1700lbs of payload. May be a little more for a reg cab/long bed vs a crew cab/ short bed.

Good luck!!!
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Old 05-18-2016, 12:07 AM   #8
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Another reason tundra is lower cause toyota is using a new standard for towing numbers the other truck makers havent gone too yet,
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Old 05-18-2016, 12:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DogFather View Post
I was just wondering if anyone knew why, the Tundra w/401 ft-lb of torque
and a 4.30 rear axle, is rated below, a GM truck w/380 ft-lb of torque and a
4.10 rear axle. All other factors being the same more torque and a high axle
ratio, generally means a greater ability to tow an RV.

As far as the full 10K. It gets that heavy w/full tank of water & LP etc. I
want a 20% safety margin. Also, the GM 6.2L maybe a beast, but you can't
get it in a regular PU. You have to buy a more expensive crew cab, in order
to get one. That would cost as much as the T (2500) Reg Cab.
Ok, now I am following. I can't answer with any certainty, but I can speculate it is because of the overall performance. The cooling, transmission, everything. You're right- by the time you pay the premium to get anything with the 6.2, you can sit yourself into a 2500 series which is a step up the food chain.
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Old 05-18-2016, 06:38 AM   #10
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The truck in my signature would struggle greatly with a 10K trailer. I'd go diesel with a trailer of that weight. That's just me..
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