Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-27-2015, 09:13 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 27
Tongue Weight - with / without WD

Hi,

I'm trying to dial in my equalizer hitch on a new vehicle and want to double check a point on the tongue weight. I read through the sticky on calculating the weights and it looks like you consider the weights with the weight distribution disconnected to determine tongue weight (along with truck alone weight). Is that correct? Since the WD takes some of the weight off that axle, I would have guessed you'd use the WITH WD weights to determine the tongue weight. I just wanted to double check which weight I should be aiming to get in the 10 - 15% range of total camper weight.

I never had my setup towing good with my old tow vehicle and so I'm really hoping to get this setup correctly.

Thanks!
__________________

Nathan48035 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2015, 10:08 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Aurora CO
Posts: 2,336
The tongue weight impacts the total payload capacity consumption of the tow vehicle.

If your tow vehicle has a 1500 payload capacity ( GVWR minus curb weight ), the loaded tongue weight of the trailer , let's say 750 lbs, is still 750 lbs , just distributed more evenly on the frame of the tow vehicle.

Yes, it shifts weight off the rear axle, which is good, but still reduces your remaining tow vehicle payload capacity by 750 lbs.

The goal of the WDH is to try to level up the tow vehicle and improve steering control. The WDH will also help manage sway issues caused by the torque of the trailer on the tow vehicle.
__________________

__________________
Jim & Kim from Colorado

2014 Eagle 30.5 RLS
2015 Dodge 3500HD SRW 6.7L
Click on my profile for Mods and notes
Jmooney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2015, 10:11 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Aurora CO
Posts: 2,336
I'm not sure I understand your question about the 10-15% target tongue weight.

I have heard that 10-15% is the average estimate of what the tongue weight is likely to be, when estimating as a percentage of trailer GVWR ( versus manufacturer listed " dry tongue weight")
__________________
Jim & Kim from Colorado

2014 Eagle 30.5 RLS
2015 Dodge 3500HD SRW 6.7L
Click on my profile for Mods and notes
Jmooney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2015, 10:18 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Aurora CO
Posts: 2,336
Check out what your payload capacity is compared to the estimated tongue weight of the trailer, then add some weight for passengers and cargo in the tow vehicle. If you are still under hat capacity, you should be fine provided that the WDH levels up the tow vehicle ( some squat is still OK )
__________________
Jim & Kim from Colorado

2014 Eagle 30.5 RLS
2015 Dodge 3500HD SRW 6.7L
Click on my profile for Mods and notes
Jmooney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2015, 10:21 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Aurora CO
Posts: 2,336
I hope that addresses your intended question.
__________________
Jim & Kim from Colorado

2014 Eagle 30.5 RLS
2015 Dodge 3500HD SRW 6.7L
Click on my profile for Mods and notes
Jmooney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2015, 10:50 PM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
 
Rustic Eagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 7,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan48035 View Post
snip...... it looks like you consider the weights with the weight distribution disconnected to determine tongue weight (along with truck alone weight). Is that correct?....snip
Your correct...., subtracting the TV's gross weight when weighed "alone" from the TV's gross weight with the TV/TT hitched (WDH spring bars "dis-engaged") will result in the TT's loaded tongue weight. It is this tongue weight that you want to fall in the 10% to 15% range of the TT's gross weight. Longer/heavy TT's a 13% to 15% range is ideal for enhanced TV handling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathan48035 View Post
snip..... Since the WD takes some of the weight off that axle, I would have guessed you'd use the WITH WD weights to determine the tongue weight.....snip
One way to look at it is that the actual loaded tongue weight for the most part remains a constant on the hitch ball (WDH engaged or dis-engaged), it's the "effect" of the tongue weight being placed on the hitch ball has on the TV's rear axle (front axle weight reduction/rear axle weight increased) that the WDH is dealing with. Most of the added rear axle weight is transferred back to the TV's front axle...., however, there is some minor residual weight transferred to the TT axles via the WDH.

Reference: https://www.jaycoowners.com/forums/f3...v-tt-3871.html

Bob
__________________

2016 GM 2500HD 6.0L/4.10
2018 Jay Flight 24RBS
2005 Jayco Eagle 278FBS (retired)
1999 Jayco Eagle 246FB (retired)
Reese HP Dual Cam (integrated sway control)
Rustic Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2015, 08:07 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 27
Ok, thanks for the confirmation.

I only have a small hybrid camper (4,350 loaded weight), but with the way I had it packed I had 27% of that on the tongue. Being that I have always had sway issue, I was trying to put all the weight up front in order to get the full benifit of the friction sway control on the equalizer. Glad I finally got the camper to the scale though so that I realized I need to adjust how I'm packing it. I'll shoot for getting that tongue weight down to where it should be.

I also, made some adjustments to the hitch to get some weight back on the front axle. It was a couple hundred pounds lighter with the trailer even with the W/D hooked up. I'm taking the camper back out this weekend so I'm going to hit the scale again and see if I have things improved.

Thanks.
Nathan48035 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2015, 09:35 PM   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
Rustic Eagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 7,370
Sounds like a good plan, and let us know the results of your follow-up at the CAT scale.

Also, when making your WDH adjustments insure that the end result produces a level trailer, or slightly nose down. Check for proper tire inflation due to your loaded conditions, under inflated tires can influence poor towing characteristics.

If you have a single axle trailer, they tend to be a little more sensitive to a little road wiggle (or sway) in less then ideal road conditions then a tandem axle.

Bob
__________________

__________________

2016 GM 2500HD 6.0L/4.10
2018 Jay Flight 24RBS
2005 Jayco Eagle 278FBS (retired)
1999 Jayco Eagle 246FB (retired)
Reese HP Dual Cam (integrated sway control)
Rustic Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.