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Old 01-06-2011, 08:30 AM   #1
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Tow Vehicles

Just as an FYI to all--- There has never been any published " standards for tow ratings" set be anyone or group other that the mfgs themselves. There will be a set of standards out soon that the mfgs will have to meet to be able to state there" towing capacitys". One of the areas that will be included will be the frontal area of the tt exposed to the wind . Very few truck mfgs list this info and it is critical to the life of your vehicle. This is where the v6 trucks/ suvs minivans have problems, albiet unknown to the driver, the running gear can, under certain conditions , get to the breaking point. If you must tow with a small vehicle a trans temp gauge might be a good investment. HAPPY MOTORING
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:08 PM   #2
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With any vehicle its best to have a full bank of gauges. Because like my friend that tows daily he's learned over 900K miles of towing that most all failure will show up as a temperature rise before the failure. So if you got gauges then you'll know something is wrong.

Like on my truck...
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:05 PM   #3
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I do not see where turbo boost or fuel pressure guages are needed but to each his own. Happy towing.
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Old 01-07-2011, 07:43 PM   #4
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I know when we towed our little 17' fiberglass Casita (grossed weight was about 2900#) with our Honda Odyssey (tow capacity of 3500#), we had Honda install the cooling system for two things on the car (for the life of me I can't remember what it's called and Don's not home to ask). Anyway, with that combination, the two sucky things were that we slowed considerably on grades, and when we descended grades, we worried about losing our breaks.... but we didn't have to worry about overheating! Otherwise we did fine . We were clueless and couldn't find any other info beyond what was offered at the Casita Forum. I actually like the idea of any additional info that can be accessed via internet to help us all tow safer (short of getting a 3/4 or one ton of course which doesn't agree with most of our pocketbooks ).

Thanks for the update Larry and Rachel!
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:15 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by av8arkie View Post
I do not see where turbo boost or fuel pressure guages are needed but to each his own. Happy towing.

If you owned a 2nd generation Dodge/Cummins you would find those gauges a necessity if you keep your truck for a long time. I have a full set of gauges in my 07.5. Low boost is a common cause of loss of power and the gauge will tell you so you know where to look. When the fuel pressure is low the VP44 fuel pump will soon quit and that equates into an expencive repair bill. You can save yourself a lot of money if you can detect a problem before it costs a fortune to fix.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:43 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by av8arkie View Post
I do not see where turbo boost or fuel pressure guages are needed but to each his own. Happy towing.
24V lift pumps are junk and if the fuel pressure falls below 10 PSI your looking at VP44 injection pump failure. It only $1,200 bucks for a injection pump. already lost the first lift pump and injection pump at 48K miles... (Because of 8 PSI fuel pressure).

As for boost... I'm running RV275 Injectors, Edge Comp (5x5), and a few other things. I can bury the boost gauge against the high side pin. The HX35 turbo is only rated to 35 PSI and it turns into a hot boost (IAT temps rise). As for EGT's I can touch 1,400*F...

I could go on but...
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:12 AM   #7
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Or just buy a DuraMax , alot less problems
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:03 AM   #8
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Or just buy a DuraMax , alot less problems
As for brand and type of vehicle... It doesn't matter if its a Ford, Chevy or Dodge... They will all pull a trailer to some degree or another. Closely matched for power... As for reliblity and maintenance is another factor no matter what brand you go with each one have its own weak spots so the comment above doesn't brother me one bit... Because I know that all 3 have there own unique problems an issues...

Just some owners handle them gracefully and other owners handle it... Errr Ummm...

Like I studied up on the weakness of the Dodge and over came every single one of them. So now maintenance is a very small task for me... Like the fact I've NEVER done a break job on my truck yet... Still running factory brake pads and I've got 180K miles on the clock... So by about 200K miles I'll do my first brake pad change... Yeah it might of cost me for the mods but in the long haul... I'll make my truck last a lot longer...
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:36 AM   #9
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Wow , I find it hard to believe youve never done a brake job at 180,000 miles , so what modes have you done to prolong brake life ? I am a ASE Master tech over 25 years , fill me in on what Ive missed
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Old 01-08-2011, 11:28 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by 19H F250 View Post
Just as an FYI to all--- There has never been any published " standards for tow ratings" set be anyone or group other that the mfgs themselves. There will be a set of standards out soon that the mfgs will have to meet to be able to state there" towing capacitys". One of the areas that will be included will be the frontal area of the tt exposed to the wind . Very few truck mfgs list this info and it is critical to the life of your vehicle. This is where the v6 trucks/ suvs minivans have problems, albiet unknown to the driver, the running gear can, under certain conditions , get to the breaking point. If you must tow with a small vehicle a trans temp gauge might be a good investment. HAPPY MOTORING
I agree.

Many Tow Vehicle companies list their vehicle's "MAX" towing rate (based on flat ground, sea level, NO wind, only 1 x 150 lbs person in the vehicle, NO onboard vehicle cargo), and in the "fine print" within their vehicle's manual, they specifiy the tow weight reduction details. Many people read the high level number and they "load her down". For example, connect a fully loaded 3,499 lbs trailer with NO concern about ofter "stress factors". And soon after, they over stress their Tow Vehicle or get into an accident. Scary that many folks do NOT read the fine print with their vehicle's manual. Or, they don't apply what they read. For more details, surf contents of: https://www.jaycoowners.com/showthread.php?t=1324

Many vehicle owners do NOT take "real world" braking ability into account as well. They obtain their local towing laws and follow it - instead of vehicle manual details or "safe" towing / braking details. For example, my region has trailer brake law at 3,000 lbs. Any trailer over 3,000 lbs needs it own brakes. On the flip side, any loaded trailer (including the weight of trailer) under 2,999 lbs do NOT need its own brakes. My Tow Vehicle has onboard cargo rating of 1,500 lbs. This means any weight ABOVE 1,500 lbs is over stressing its factory brakes. And, it also means any trailer above 1,500 lbs is OVER STRESSING its brakes as well. For safe braking, any attached trailer above vehicles "onboard cargo weight" needs brakes "on the trailer". For more details, surf: https://www.jaycoowners.com/showthread.php?t=1324

I also agree that a transmission guage "moving needle type" is a great proactive tool as well. When the needle gets too high, one can proactively reduce the towing stress. Or, if always running in hot range, they can install a larger transmission cooler as well.

So yes. I agree with you. Simple "safe towing" items that many don't know about or don't apply - to their own towing combo.

Good reminder too all....

.
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