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Old 06-18-2016, 09:16 AM   #1
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TPMS Usage Question

Just returned from my first extended trip with our 2016 Jay Feather 23RLSW, and all went very well. But I noticed something that I thought was a bit odd, and wondered if anyone can clear this up for me.

I'm using a TireMinder TM55c, and am just delighted with it. Price was great, installation and setup were just fine, and they were very quick to answer questions for me.

The loaded weight of the trailer is around 5000 pounds.

Did 250 miles one day, and about 400 the next, as we broke our trip into 2 segments. The TT tires started each day at as close to 50 pounds cold as I could get them. As expected, pressures rose during the trip, to as high as about 59 pounds. We kept our speeds to no more than 62 1/2 MPH, rarely going over 65 for anything. About half the trip was Interstates. Air temps ranged from 70 to mid-80's.

Took me a while to get here, but here's my question. I noticed that the temperature on my rear axle tires ran several degrees hotter than the front axle tires, usually 4-6 degrees. Is this normal, to be expected, and if so, what causes it? If it's not normal, what might cause it and is it something I should talk to my dealer about?

And for experienced TPMS users, what might I expect normal tire temps to look like during a long trip? How high is normal, what is the safe range?

Thanks,

Roger
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Old 06-18-2016, 10:28 AM   #2
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The manufacturer of my TPMS says that damage to tires can start to occur at 158 degrees; this is the minimum set point with my system. I have never seen temperatures even near that hot with my system.

When towing and the sun is shining on your tires the temperatures will easily be 15 or 20 degrees above the ambient temperature.

When monitoring temperature, I've found that the sun makes a huge difference in tire temperatures, either front to back or side to side, depending on the angle of the sun. Also, if for some reason the rear tires are carrying more weight than the front the rear tires would run hotter. And, if there is some tire structural damage, tires can run hotter.

The main thing I've found is that even with a TPMS, it's a good idea to inspect tires at each stop for problems, including out of roundness and bulges.
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Old 06-19-2016, 12:45 PM   #3
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With my TV the drive axles run about 10 degrees hotter than the front axle. Seems to me that would be normal. It was that way on a former TV too.

Dale
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Old 06-19-2016, 01:09 PM   #4
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With my TV the drive axles run about 10 degrees hotter than the front axle. Seems to me that would be normal. It was that way on a former TV too.

Dale
Interesting, but I'm seeing this on the trailer tires, not the TV. The trailer tires are less than a foot apart, and it seems to me that weight/stress should be pretty much equal on them, front and rear. Note that pressures remained identical, it's only the temp that's higher on the rear tires of the trailer.

Thanks for the thought!

Roger
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Old 06-19-2016, 01:30 PM   #5
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... Note that pressures remained identical, it's only the temp that's higher on the rear tires of the trailer...

Thanks for the thought!

Roger
It's not possible for a normal gas to increase in temperature and not have a corresponding increase in pressure (Charles's Law).

Is your trailer completely level - if the front is higher, there will be more weight on the rear axle. Or maybe there is heavier stuff at the rear of he trailer than in the front? Or maybe the TPMS is not completely accurate (mine's not).

How much higher are the temps in the rear than in the front?
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Old 06-19-2016, 02:32 PM   #6
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Or maybe the TPMS is not completely accurate (mine's not).

How much higher are the temps in the rear than in the front?
Per my original question in this thread, the difference is 4-6 degrees. And it certainly is possible that the TPMS is not totally accurate, although the "cold" temps and pressures at the beginning of each travel day are extremely close on all 4 tires.

And maybe it's just a "don't worry about it" thing.

Roger
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Old 06-19-2016, 02:52 PM   #7
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Personally I don't think external TPMS temperature has much value. The device is too far removed from the tire to measure internal tire temperature even if it's only an inch. It's measuring a combination of outside air temperature and road temperature. An internal TPMS would measure the true tire air temperature.
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Old 06-21-2016, 07:52 PM   #8
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I check tire temps with a heat gun and both front and rear trailer tires usually are the same temp. I always jump out and do the sunny side first because it only takes a minute for the sunny side to get warmer. I also check bearing temp at the same time.
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Old 06-21-2016, 08:35 PM   #9
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I check tire temps with a heat gun and both front and rear trailer tires usually are the same temp. I always jump out and do the sunny side first because it only takes a minute for the sunny side to get warmer. I also check bearing temp at the same time.
Like your thinking there, Clutch. Hopefully I'm running out of stuff to buy (accessories), that infrared laser temp sensor is on the short list one of these days.

Thanks,

Roger
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Old 06-25-2016, 03:42 PM   #10
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rkresge, glad to hear your trip had no problems. As clutch says, a infared heat gun is worth the expense to carry along.


I don't know if you have Harbor Freight in your area, but they have a decent price when on sale. I think I paid $25 or $30 a couple of years ago.


Multiple uses around the house also.
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