Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-11-2015, 02:18 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: millsboro
Posts: 55
Tranny temp How hot is too hot??

I have a 2010 dodge ram 1500 with the 5.7 Hemi, and I pull a Jay flight 22FB, it pulls it great, I try to keep an eye on my tranny temps, I went today to pick it up from the dealer after getting some warranty work done, and on the way home I was in a traffic jam and I was watching my temps, the tranny temp went up to 171 degrees, then came back down, how hot is too hot?? once traffic started moving it dropped down to 150-155. is this ok??
__________________

__________________
2010 dodge ram 1500
HEMI 5.7 4X4
2014 jay flight 22 FB
seaswirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 03:02 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 136
that is a pretty normal number. my rav4 used to hit 200 just doing city driving, installed a 14.4k btu cooler and now I'm around 160. On the oil cooler box, they say that over 195F is where the oil / transmission life suffers
__________________

__________________
2011 Swift SLX 154bh /2012 Rav4 V6 with airbags & 15k btu transmission cooler.
km counter: 1700
octane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 03:04 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
tugboat95's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: New Bern
Posts: 403
You are well within normal range. 225 and above is cause for worry....sometimes. Reason your temp went up was you quit moving and had no air flow over your cooler. Some rigs have auxiliary fans that kick on in that situation. Either way 170 is very much right on the money. The cooler the better. Watch your temps as you drive and you Will see either when your thermostat opens or the fan comes on depending on your set up.
tugboat95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 03:36 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 923
It depends on the vehicle. The newer F150s are designed to have hotter running trannys... I can only guess the reason is for better efficiency with hotter/less viscous oil. The hottest I have ever seen mine go is 95*C but I have heard of other guys seeing temps past water's boiling point. Apparently it's when you get into the 230s that you have to be careful... I have never seen my tranny temp gauge go a hair above the middle mark.
__________________
2013 F-150 EcoBoost MaxTow, Roush tuned (415hp 506tq), lifted on 33s, R.A.S.
2013 Jay Flight 28BHS Elite (Equalizer 10K hitch)
SkyBound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 03:42 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
tugboat95's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: New Bern
Posts: 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyBound View Post
It depends on the vehicle. The newer F150s are designed to have hotter running trannys... I can only guess the reason is for better efficiency with hotter/less viscous oil. The hottest I have ever seen mine go is 95*C but I have heard of other guys seeing temps past water's boiling point. Apparently it's when you get into the 230s that you have to be careful... I have never seen my tranny temp gauge go a hair above the middle mark.
My 09 ford escape transmission temp runs 190-200. Water temp is 212-220. Go figure. My 99 suburban xmission runs 175 or so light But goes to 190 towing. My water temps stay below 200. So yeah,,,newer Ford's seem to be hotter. As a rule though transmission oil doesn't start to break down until it hits 225 and that's dependant on type brand etc.
tugboat95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 04:33 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Aurora CO
Posts: 2,336
I found this helpful

Name:  image.jpg
Views: 191
Size:  11.2 KB
__________________
Jim & Kim from Colorado

2014 Eagle 30.5 RLS
2015 Dodge 3500HD SRW 6.7L
Click on my profile for Mods and notes
Jmooney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 04:53 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: MD
Posts: 3,092
Tranny temp How hot is too hot??

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyBound View Post
It depends on the vehicle. The newer F150s are designed to have hotter running trannys... I can only guess the reason is for better efficiency with hotter/less viscous oil. The hottest I have ever seen mine go is 95*C but I have heard of other guys seeing temps past water's boiling point. Apparently it's when you get into the 230s that you have to be careful... I have never seen my tranny temp gauge go a hair above the middle mark.

So your saying the new ford transmissions are designed to normally run at hotter temps. Did they design a new fluid that was also designed to handle those hotter temps? Just asking as I don't know. I would think the engineers would want to overbuild the transmissions so they would not get hotter when towing what the truck is rated for as... Maybe that's what you meant. Again only curious.
__________________
2017 JayFlight 28BHBE
2014 JayFlight Swift 264BH (Sold)
2007 GMC 2500 Sierra Classic Crew Cab LBZ Duramax / 6spd Allison
SouthCo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 05:01 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
NVGun40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Eagle River, AK
Posts: 810
I have now seen a couple of posts in which 'tranny' temps are discussed. Many of these posts have some good advice and primarily discuss the bigger 3/4 ton and larger 'heavy duty' towing and hauling vehicles. However, for those who are new to towing and hauling, I would like to point out something I have not seen mentioned.
Very few vehicles (even those with tow packages, and including the larger heavy duty rigs) come with a dedicated 'tranny' temp guage. Usually, (especially on gas engines) to gain an accurate tranny temp, you have to install a separate gauge.

Just for the general knowledge of those who are new to towing.
__________________
We are just a humble drinking couple with a hunting and camping problem.
2015 White Hawk 25BHS Glacier Package
2004 Dodge Ram 2500, 5.7 Hemi, 5Spd Manual
2008 Arctic Cat M1000 SnoPro
Previous: Northface tent/Komfort 5er/Jamboree MH
Lance Cabover/Prowler TT/WildernessTT/Tiltin Hiltin Cabover/Starcraft popup
NVGun40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 05:11 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: MD
Posts: 3,092
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVGun40 View Post
I have now seen a couple of posts in which 'tranny' temps are discussed. Many of these posts have some good advice and primarily discuss the bigger 3/4 ton and larger 'heavy duty' towing and hauling vehicles. However, for those who are new to towing and hauling, I would like to point out something I have not seen mentioned.
Very few vehicles (even those with tow packages, and including the larger heavy duty rigs) come with a dedicated 'tranny' temp guage. Usually, (especially on gas engines) to gain an accurate tranny temp, you have to install a separate gauge.

Just for the general knowledge of those who are new to towing.

So where is the tranny temp gauge getting its reading from on those vehicles? Good info.
__________________
2017 JayFlight 28BHBE
2014 JayFlight Swift 264BH (Sold)
2007 GMC 2500 Sierra Classic Crew Cab LBZ Duramax / 6spd Allison
SouthCo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 05:25 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
tugboat95's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: New Bern
Posts: 403
Both of mine are factory sensors feeding the ECM. They are both on the line coming from the cooler into the transmission. I read my temps with an app on my kindle and phone connected thru the OBDII port. This is what the engine computer reads and in such it's is the number the computer uses to evaluate running condition if the engine and gear.
__________________

tugboat95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.