Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-23-2015, 09:18 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Calgary
Posts: 796
He is using LT tires. Not trailer tires (ST).
If you want to know for sure look up the manufacturer recommended pressure for a specific load. They will have a recommended pressure for the weight of the vehicle or trailer in this case.
I would guess that you are fine though.
__________________

__________________
2014 Jayco Swift 281BHS, 300W Solar!
2015 F250 XLT 4x4 Crew Cab, Short box, 6.2 gas
Subaru297 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 10:14 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
mike837go's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Campbell Hall
Posts: 2,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ela1948 View Post
I always run max tire pressure because it equates to less heat build up which is a major cause of tire failure. ...
There is an issue with that philosophy:

When a tire is overinflated for the load it is carrying, the center of the tread will bulge and give you odd handling characteristics and uneven tread wear.

The maximum inflation is the rated capacity of the tire and may not be appropriate for all situations.
__________________

__________________
TT 2015 19RD "TheJayco"
TV 2003 F-350 "Montblanc" - Housebroken chore truck


Sitting in The Cheap Seats.
And proud of it!
mike837go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 10:37 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 2,058
X2 on the above 2 posts!
__________________
Chuck
2013 Jayco Jayfeather X20 E, 2008 GMC Sierra 1500 Crew Cab Z71 SLE
DocBrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 10:54 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
VicS1950's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike837go View Post
There is an issue with that philosophy:

When a tire is overinflated for the load it is carrying, the center of the tread will bulge and give you odd handling characteristics and uneven tread wear.

The maximum inflation is the rated capacity of the tire and may not be appropriate for all situations.
I have run max sidewall pressure on my trailer tires for decades. I have no handling issues. I watch the tread patterns on all of my vehicles. I have found that max sidewall pressure on my ST tires gives even wear across the tread. Radial tire wear patterns are less affected by pressures as opposed to bias ply construction

Don't be afraid to run max sidewall pressure. The tires are designed for that or they wouldn't put it on the sidewall. Goodyear even recommends 10 psi above ST sidewall when operating over 65 mph.

https://www.tirerack.com/images/tire...plications.pdf

Running trailer tires at too low a pressure can add to heating which can add up to failure. That is never a good thing. Travel Trailer manufacturers build trailers and buy tires. I trust the tire manufacturers for my information over some RV builder.

FWIW. vic
VicS1950 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 11:17 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
mike837go's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Campbell Hall
Posts: 2,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by VicS1950 View Post
I have run max sidewall pressure on my trailer tires for decades. I have no handling issues. I watch the tread patterns on all of my vehicles. I have found that max sidewall pressure on my ST tires gives even wear across the tread. Radial tire wear patterns are less affected by pressures as opposed to bias ply construction

Don't be afraid to run max sidewall pressure. The tires are designed for that or they wouldn't put it on the sidewall. Goodyear even recommends 10 psi above ST sidewall when operating over 65 mph.

https://www.tirerack.com/images/tire...plications.pdf

Running trailer tires at too low a pressure can add to heating which can add up to failure. That is never a good thing. Travel Trailer manufacturers build trailers and buy tires. I trust the tire manufacturers for my information over some RV builder.

FWIW. vic
Re-read that TSB "increased by 10 psi (70 kPa) above the recommended pressure based on the trailer placard" (emphasis mine)

The max on the sidewall should never be exceeded!

And yes, chronic underinflation will overheat and destroy tires.

What I have a problem with is a blanket statement that always keeping all tires at the maximum inflation is a good thing.

Tire manufacturers are saddled with the responsibility of their product carrying an unknown load. So they clearly print ON THE PRODUCT what the maximum safe limits of their product are.

Then the car/truck/trailer makers choose a tire that will carry their product. And publish the recommended pressures that will produce safe and consistent unladen operation.

How can a car/truck/trailer manufacturer know exactly how much of our stuff is going to be carried on any given day? They CAN NOT!

So, it is up to us users of these things to make the choices every-single-day between safety, economy, time, etc.

I know my priorities. I really like getting to my destination without unpleasant surprises! If that means driving slower, getting a good night's rest and performing proper maintenance on my vehicles; Those are prices I am willing to pay.
__________________
TT 2015 19RD "TheJayco"
TV 2003 F-350 "Montblanc" - Housebroken chore truck


Sitting in The Cheap Seats.
And proud of it!
mike837go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 12:19 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
VicS1950's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike837go View Post
Re-read that TSB "[SIZE=3]increased by 10 psi (70 kPa) above the recommended pressure based on the trailer placard" (emphasis mine)

The max on the sidewall should never be exceeded!

And yes, chronic underinflation will overheat and destroy tires.

...
Good catch. I missed that.

I know what has worked for me beginning in the late 1960's.

We would often bump the pressure above sidewall when towing cars on trailers. Never had a problem.

Under-inflation is a greater sin than max sidewall inflation. vic
VicS1950 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 01:16 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
mike837go's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Campbell Hall
Posts: 2,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by VicS1950 View Post
Good catch. I missed that.

I know what has worked for me beginning in the late 1960's.

We would often bump the pressure above sidewall when towing cars on trailers. Never had a problem.

Under-inflation is a greater sin than max sidewall inflation. vic
Yeah.

But, uh... hasn't tire construction changed a bit since the 1960's?

I think I remember the term 'radial' being batted around sometime in the 1970's. Correct me if I'm wrong about the timing. I didn't get my driver's license until 1977.
__________________
TT 2015 19RD "TheJayco"
TV 2003 F-350 "Montblanc" - Housebroken chore truck


Sitting in The Cheap Seats.
And proud of it!
mike837go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 02:12 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: St. Clairsville
Posts: 227
Typically I run the trailer tires at max indicated pressure. As full timers, we tend to run a little more toward the GVWR. Our weight also goes up and down depending upon how much we have in the tanks. On long cross country moves we don't typically hook up much. I monitor what we are supposed to and motor on. Can't say we've ever had trouble. With the truck, it depends. On a long move I will run more toward the max pressure, but on short moves I typically leave it at about 60 psi instead of 80. Never had any problems there either.

In a small business we ran 1-ton duallies and F-Super Duties. We often ran 90-100 psi in a load range E 80 psi tire without any problems when we were moving heavy things (an F-Super Duty does squat a bit under 7 tons of slab wood ). We talked with our tire shop back then (80's, 90's) and they said it was common practice to do that and the tires could handle it. We never had a failure unless it was a puncture. That being said, nowadays I run closer to recommended pressures because of the higher speeds and, honestly, I don't think the product is as good, so I don't trust it as much.
djtho1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 03:05 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Filthy-Beast's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by VicS1950 View Post
I have run max sidewall pressure on my trailer tires for decades. >....................< I trust the tire manufacturers for my information over some RV builder.

FWIW. vic
These two statements can contradict each other. Here is the Maxxis load chart for trailer tires, an 6000# dual axle trailer would put a load of 1500# on each tire.

Trailer Tire Load/Inflation Chart | Maxxis Tires USA

You would not want run the bottom tire at 80# on a dual axle 6000# trailer.

You can also do the chalk test, buy some of the big sidewalk chalk for kids from the dollar store. Rub it across the tread of the tire, completely cover a spot several inches wide, from inside wall to outside wall. Drive several 100 feet on a level parking lot. Look at the chalk pattern.

  • More chalk on center treads than outside treads is an under-inflated tire.
  • More chalk on outside treads vs middle of the tire is and over-inflated tire.
  • Even chalk wear means in you're the ball park.
__________________
2015 Jay Flight 31 RLDS
2015 F250, Reese straightline
Ham Lic: W4TFB
Filthy-Beast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2015, 07:42 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
VicS1950's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike837go View Post
Yeah.

But, uh... hasn't tire construction changed a bit since the 1960's?

I think I remember the term 'radial' being batted around sometime in the 1970's. Correct me if I'm wrong about the timing. I didn't get my driver's license until 1977.
Ok. I'll give you the late 60's and 70's. Give me the 80's on.

So for for only 35 years I've been towing my trailers, OP trailers, commercial trailers using max sidewall. I've had one catastrophic tire failure at speed from hitting a chunk of truck suspension part in the road. (knock/touch wood) Not because I run at max pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Filthy-Beast View Post
These two statements can contradict each other. Here is the Maxxis load chart for trailer tires, an 6000# dual axle trailer would put a load of 1500# on each tire.

Trailer Tire Load/Inflation Chart | Maxxis Tires USA

You would not want run the bottom tire at 80# on a dual axle 6000# trailer.
Huh? Please elaborate.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Filthy-Beast View Post
You can also do the chalk test, buy some of the big sidewalk chalk for kids from the dollar store. Rub it across the tread of the tire, completely cover a spot several inches wide, from inside wall to outside wall. Drive several 100 feet on a level parking lot. Look at the chalk pattern.

  • More chalk on center treads than outside treads is an under-inflated tire.
  • More chalk on outside treads vs middle of the tire is and over-inflated tire.
  • Even chalk wear means in you're the ball park.
I'm aware of the chalk test. As I never run my trailer tires close to being worn out I haven't ever bothered with it. My tires wear evenly enough to not matter. Handling has been fine. I don't put enough miles on trailer tires to change them out for tread wear. They age out before that.

I know that too little pressure is bad. I prefer to err on the high side. Everyone can do what they wish. Base your choices on what works for you.

I do need to submit some edits to a moderator re. the Marathon pdf.


vic
__________________

VicS1950 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.