Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-27-2016, 11:57 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Austin
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustang65 View Post
As mentioned in an earlier post, you should not let your battery drop below the 50% level (aprox12.00VDC). Most TT's have the light bar battery status monitor in them, they are pretty much useless. It was also recommended that you get a digital voltage meter, like one that plugs into the 12VDC accessory receptacle in the TT. There are a lot of them on Amazon that you can pick up for a decent price and are pretty accurate. These will keep you informed as to how your battery is doing. You can always give the battery(s) a little boost (with the TV) at the end of the day before calling it a night. That should help you make it through the night (unless you are using the TT's heating system).

There are 2 examples below. The easy one that plugs into the 12VDC accessory plug and the second one you need to wire in. Not sure of your mechanical/electrical skills.

Don
Okay so today I checked my battery at the TT storage location not Hooke to car, it read 12.2. I will be towing for about 30 minutes to camp ground. Any idea what it might read afterwards?
__________________

ashmanbrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2016, 12:06 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
dalebra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Waconia, MN
Posts: 433
If your TV 7-Way connector is wired correctly you should be very close to the same. Your TV will keep a charge on your TT's battery. Again, as long as it's wired correctly.
__________________

__________________
2015 Chevy Silverado 2500HD CC Duramax
2016 Eagle 323LKTS Java
Pull Rite SuperGlide #4100 Hitch w/Mor-Ryde Pin Box
dalebra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2016, 12:35 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
oldmanAZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: AZ
Posts: 7,052
If you measured 12.2 volts with virtually no draws on your TT battery, then the battery is at around 50-60% of being fully charged.

Your TV will charge your battery during your 30 minute drive, but the current will be too low and the time too short to help your TT battery very much. If you measure your TT voltage when you stop, initially it probably will look higher than 12.2 volts. BUT that is what is called a 'surface charge.' A short time after drawing power from the battery, the voltage will quickly drop down, probably to the 12.2 volts again.

To fully charge the TT battery, it will need to be charged with a battery charger, or through a TT converter, at a higher current (amperage) and for a greater length of time.
__________________
Sherm & Terry w/rescues Eydie (min Schnauzer) Steve RIP (std Poodle)
2015 Jay Flight 27RLS (Camped: 102 nights '15, 90 nights '16, 70 nights '17 so far)
2006 Ford F350 6.0 PSD, Lariat, 4WD, CC, LB, SRW, auto., Camper pkg.
oldmanAZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2016, 02:49 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Jagiven's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldmanAZ View Post
If you measured 12.2 volts with virtually no draws on your TT battery, then the battery is at around 50-60% of being fully charged.

Your TV will charge your battery during your 30 minute drive, but the current will be too low and the time too short to help your TT battery very much. If you measure your TT voltage when you stop, initially it probably will look higher than 12.2 volts. BUT that is what is called a 'surface charge.' A short time after drawing power from the battery, the voltage will quickly drop down, probably to the 12.2 volts again.

To fully charge the TT battery, it will need to be charged with a battery charger, or through a TT converter, at a higher current (amperage) and for a greater length of time.
From my experience, you can get a full charge from driving, but it takes hours. It seams like you need a minimum of 4 hours to get a decent charge from driving. 30 minutes just gives it a small trickle of a charge.
Jagiven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2016, 05:13 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Austin
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldmanAZ View Post
A voltmeter only shows volts. And, as Don said, the voltmeter should not go lower than 12 volts when nothing is drawing off the battery.

If you have the voltmeter plugged into a 12 volt outlet, the voltage can be lower than 12 volts while 12 volt items (lights, water pump, etc.) are drawing current. When all those items are off, you want the voltmeter to show 12 volts or more.

In reality, you cannot easily shut off ALL 12 volt items - items like the propane detector and refrigerator running on propane - but those are very low current draw so I ignore them. Just shut off all the items you can switch off and see what the voltmeter shows.

Plus, when you are plugged into shore power, you will see the converter charging the battery and voltmeter will read in the 13 volt range.
So I had my battery charged today, it reads 12.5 (up from 12.2, it actually read 12.7 at first but mow is a steady 12.5. My rv storage guy says these batteries only last about 12-24 months, and I should gay a new one fairly soon before this dies on me while I'm camping. What is your experience with battery life? Thamks
ashmanbrian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2016, 05:50 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 923
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashmanbrian View Post
So can you tell me what I should be able to see on this voltmeter "number wise" since you said not to let it get below 50%,ie. 12VDC? What sort of number should I see when nothing is drawing off the battery? Will I see amps or voltage? I am clueless as to what number is okay.
Here's a chart that shows how much reserve your battery has.
As others have said, you do not want to drop below 50 percent discharge as it will shorten your battery life. When fully charged, the battery should have voltage near the top of this chart. Every battery is a bit different, but as you can see, one tenth of a volt can actually make a big difference.

dewey02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2016, 05:59 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
oldmanAZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: AZ
Posts: 7,052
I have little first hand experience with RV battery life. The vast majority of what I have learned is on the JOF pages and other internet sources. There several members that have had RVs for a long time, and learned from their mistakes, and are willing to share information on what works and what does not.

Your RV storage guy may be correct in that RV batteries don't last very long, but my reading leads me to believe that the reason for that is the vast majority of RV owners treat their batteries VERY BADLY. Given proper care, RV batteries can last many years.

It is unlikely your battery will fail without warning. If you have a voltmeter to check your RV battery state of charge, you will be able to see the changes while you are camping.
__________________
Sherm & Terry w/rescues Eydie (min Schnauzer) Steve RIP (std Poodle)
2015 Jay Flight 27RLS (Camped: 102 nights '15, 90 nights '16, 70 nights '17 so far)
2006 Ford F350 6.0 PSD, Lariat, 4WD, CC, LB, SRW, auto., Camper pkg.
oldmanAZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2016, 06:09 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 923
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashmanbrian View Post
So I had my battery charged today, it reads 12.5 (up from 12.2, it actually read 12.7 at first but mow is a steady 12.5. My rv storage guy says these batteries only last about 12-24 months, and I should gay a new one fairly soon before this dies on me while I'm camping. What is your experience with battery life? Thamks
How old is your battery?
What size and type is your battery?
I wouldn't be too quick to automatically replace it.
When you had it charged, how long was it charged? Who charged it and what kind of charger did they use? Sometimes it takes a very long time to fully charge up a battery (long time on float charge to get those last couple of tenths of volts up there).
Battery life is variable depending upon type and brand of battery, how often it was discharged below 50%, and sometime just dumb luck. Really a battery should certainly last more than 12 months if it is not abused. Two years at a minimum and several years is what I think many people experience.
dewey02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2016, 06:19 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
BrentB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Austin
Posts: 152
I have a dual purpose battery from Interstate and granted I don't do a lot of boondocking, but so far it has lasted four years and is still going strong.
BrentB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2016, 08:21 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Kelowna, BC Canada
Posts: 215
I have 2 12v RV/Marine batteries in the slide-in camper and they are going on year 8. Camper is always plugged in when at home and we always boondock. We have had a powered site maybe twice since we bought her. TT has dual 12v RV/Marine batteries as well and so far 2 yrs with no trouble. It is also plugged in when not in use.
Happy Camping
__________________

__________________
'07 Chevrolet Silverado 3500HD XC LB SRW 4X2.
Powerstop Brakes on all corners.
'15 JayFlight 28BHBE Elite Fibreglass
Andersen Hitch.
'07 Northern Lite 10-2RR Camper.
SuperSprings.
Northern Jay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.