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Old 10-12-2015, 04:00 PM   #11
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For the cost of 2 gallons of RV anti-freeze, I don't understand why people take the risk. Blowing out the lines might work, but then again you might have some water left in a line or a fitting. For about $8 worth of anti-freeze you displace ALL the water and don't have to worry about water expansion in your lines, pump or fittings.
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Old 10-12-2015, 04:31 PM   #12
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Blow out the lines, dump a gallon of anti-freeze down the drains and all is good until spring. No foaming or foul tasting water to deal with every spring. Absolutely no reason to do both. That is just nothing but over kill. Either anti-freeze or blowing out the lines is all you need. No, I'm not way up north, but we do see negative teens, and sometimes -20's in the winter. It's no different than blowing out your sprinkler system, and I bet nobody runs anti-freeze in there.
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Old 10-12-2015, 04:45 PM   #13
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Wait a minute... Some posters said antifreeze in the water heater. I'm a newbie so please forgive me, but I was told to never have antifreeze in the water heater. That is why there is by-pass values, so you can winterize the entire plumbing system with antifreeze and by-pass the water heater.(after draining it of course)
Various youtube videos also have by-passing the water heater during winterization.
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Old 10-12-2015, 04:54 PM   #14
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I have not read of anyone filling the wh with antifreeze on purpose. Bypass, drain wh and low point drains. Then pull antifreeze into the lines and faucets. Pour some in traps. Done.
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Old 10-12-2015, 05:04 PM   #15
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No, you do not want anti-freeze in your water heater. What little bit that is left in there after draining is fine. A cup of water freezing in a 6 gallon container hurts nothing. And, if you leave the plug out as some recommend, that little bit of water will likely evaporate before it would have a chance to freeze.

norty1, read post #2 in this thread.
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Old 10-12-2015, 05:35 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven View Post
Wait a minute... Some posters said antifreeze in the water heater. I'm a newbie so please forgive me, but I was told to never have antifreeze in the water heater. That is why there is by-pass values, so you can winterize the entire plumbing system with antifreeze and by-pass the water heater.(after draining it of course)
Various youtube videos also have by-passing the water heater during winterization.
None of the tanks need antifreeze.

I do have a coworker who's husband insists on filling the water heater full. Each to there own.
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Old 10-12-2015, 06:48 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobx2 View Post

norty1, read post #2 in this thread.

what specifically?
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Old 10-12-2015, 07:01 PM   #18
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In the past I have only used the antifreeze method and it has worked well. This year with a new unit which has a residential refrigerator I ended up doing both. I initially blew out the system. I then closed the supply valves to the refrigerator and ran antifreeze through the rest of the system. Guess I'll find out in Spring of 16 whether or not that was a good idea.

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Old 10-12-2015, 07:46 PM   #19
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I do both, as well. I blow-out, because there's a very small section of pipe behind the water heater between the heater bypass valve and the heater feed valve that won't drain by gravity, even if I pull the drain plug from the heater. In known this, because it froze and cracked the feed valve the first winter, after I had gravity drained, closed the tank valves, and opened the bypass (Rockwood's have a three valve system).

I winterized the Rockwood for the LAST TIME today, as it'll soon be traded for my new North Point 377RLBH!!!!
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Old 10-12-2015, 08:23 PM   #20
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My opinions.

A small heel of water in a tank is not a problem.

A small amount of water in PEX tubing is not a problem.

A fitting full of water can be a problem.

A single freeze is not generally a problem. The freeze thaw cycle is what does the damage.

The cycle is this for anywhere there is a full volume of water.

The water freezes which expands the volume. If the water partially thaws then more liquid water moves into the voids. That water then again freezes which expands more than just the original volume freezing. Every time the cycle happens it puts more stress on the fitting or contained space.

That is why low spots in seasonal cabin copper tubing become "pregnant". Eventually the tubing is stretched to the point of failure from the freeze-thaw cycles. My experience is that improperly drained seasonal cabin low spots take about 3 winter seasons to fail. PEX tubing is much more forgiving than is copper tubing.

The above said, using air to blow out the water and achieve enough air space to avoid problems can be very effective. I prefer to just blow out boat systems and my travel trailer to avoid the Spring season process of getting rid of the anti-freeze in the pressure lines. We always drink the water from our trailer system.

I now pour a bit more anti-freeze into my black and gray tanks than I once did. I learned that there was more heel left in the black tank after our end season campsite connection dump than I expected. For some reason emptying to a dump station (as is my usual practice) drains the black tank more effectively. I'm not worried about the tank proper. I'm worried about the freeze-thaw water which may collect in the hard plastic dump valve.

FWIW. vic
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