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Old 03-28-2012, 09:52 PM   #11
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Def plan on gas for fridge and furnace when boondocking
We won't have the inverter installed on our first outing and there will be no shore power for sure this first trip.

Trip will only be two nights.. so hoping the battery will hold up.
How long would it take to charge the battery from flat with the TV hooked and running?

The inverter will be used for everything hopefully at some point, Microwave and AC....if it will do it.

the Inverter is 3000, 5k surge so I'm thinking I'm in good shape with this.
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Old 03-29-2012, 07:03 AM   #12
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AC, as in air conditioning? Yeah, your 3k inverter will power that but unless you have some very large battery bank, it won't be for very long.
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Old 03-29-2012, 10:58 AM   #13
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AC, as in air conditioning? Yeah, your 3k inverter will power that but unless you have some very large battery bank, it won't be for very long.
The thought is, while traveling.. stopping for lunch, TV engine running, TT ac would be used for an hour or so..
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Old 03-30-2012, 11:04 PM   #14
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Keep in mind that 1 amp AC is approx. 10 amps DC so if your air conditioner draws 15 amps AC, that will be 150 amps DC. You will need 0 gauge or at minimum 1 gauge wiring from your batteries to your inverter to handle that load & heat.

Watts = amps x volts. So 1 amp @ 120 volts = 120 watts, & 15 amps at 120 volts = 1800 watts. Your 3000 watt inverter will handle the load, but you will need some good battery power.

Lets say you have 2 12v 100ah batteries wired parallel that would act as 1 12v 200ah battery. If both batteries were in perfect condition & 100% charged you would use approx. 75% of your battery running the air for 1 hour, and that's on the easy side of things.

I used to have a cruiser (boat) with a 3000 watt inverter & I had 5 12v 90ah batteries wired parallel and it would last about 24 hours when being careful, but I could also kill it in about 3 hours with the air, hot water tank, etc. Most of the boat, air, stove, hot water all needed AC, no propane option.

Good luck!
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Old 03-31-2012, 06:10 AM   #15
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Welcome to the JOF, cablerum and thanks for posting. If you want, stop over to the New Members forum and say howdy.
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:35 AM   #16
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Keep in mind that 1 amp AC is approx. 10 amps DC so if your air conditioner draws 15 amps AC, that will be 150 amps DC. You will need 0 gauge or at minimum 1 gauge wiring from your batteries to your inverter to handle that load & heat.

Watts = amps x volts. So 1 amp @ 120 volts = 120 watts, & 15 amps at 120 volts = 1800 watts. Your 3000 watt inverter will handle the load, but you will need some good battery power.

Lets say you have 2 12v 100ah batteries wired parallel that would act as 1 12v 200ah battery. If both batteries were in perfect condition & 100% charged you would use approx. 75% of your battery running the air for 1 hour, and that's on the easy side of things.

I used to have a cruiser (boat) with a 3000 watt inverter & I had 5 12v 90ah batteries wired parallel and it would last about 24 hours when being careful, but I could also kill it in about 3 hours with the air, hot water tank, etc. Most of the boat, air, stove, hot water all needed AC, no propane option.

Good luck!
you numbers are what I'm looking for, thanks

What's your thoughts on single deep cycle battery/inverter and ENGINE RUNNING... to run the AC for an hour or so for lunch?
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Old 04-02-2012, 04:32 PM   #17
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you numbers are what I'm looking for, thanks

What's your thoughts on single deep cycle battery/inverter and ENGINE RUNNING... to run the AC for an hour or so for lunch?
Simply put, it won't work. I doubt your single battery will even allow for the AC start-up. Remember an appliance draws up to twice its rated amps during start-up. That's why you see generators with 2 ratings, such as 7000 watts peak or surge & 5000 watts continuous. If your AC uses 15 amps continuous, it requires about 22 amps when the compressor first kicks in for the first few seconds. I bet it would cause your inverter to alarm low battery & kick off with just 1 battery. My inverter would kick off once the batteries reached 10.5 volts and with that much draw on a single battery voltage would drop quickly. You also can't charge a battery as fast as you can drain it so having the vehicle running would only make a little difference, especially since the charging wire from the TV to the trailer is not rated for much amp draw, it's more like a trickle charger.

You would most likely need 2 batteries minimum, approx. 100ah+ each, and even then if you got it to run an hour you would be lucky.

Remember, lower voltage batteries have higher AH ratings. That why you see things such as electric golf carts & fork lifts use 6 volt batteries as opposed to 12 volt. Generally two 6 volts batteries would last longer then one 12 volt battery because when they are combined you get greater AH. The 6 volt battery is the same physical size and sometimes bigger, but the lower voltage provides higher AH. So if you got room for 2 batteries try two 6 volts wired in series to create 12 volts. Here is a link from Trojan batteries. They are popular in the RV & marine world. They have several 6 & 12 volt deep cycle options. Use the drop down and select a battery. It will tell you that batteries AH rating, dimensions and weight.

Good luck..let me know what you decide to try & the outcome. Please be very careful when wiring batteries and working with DC.
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Old 04-15-2012, 10:41 PM   #18
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Well, I can officially say, a 3000w inverter with 5000w peak, will not run the AC in a x17z. Runs everything else including the microwave just fine.
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:14 AM   #19
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I'm going dry camping in 2 weeks with my new X17Z. I already have a Honda Companion that I will be bringing with me. I intend to have my battery charged up before quiet hours start. Assuming the battery is fully charged, is it safe to assume that I'll get a night's worth of furnace usage? Stat at 65, nights in the 40s. PUGS and Reflectix installed on the bunk ends.

???
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Old 10-03-2013, 11:37 AM   #20
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dddire - your battery does not have 140 amp hours. That is the reserve capacity for cranking (starting). The battery is rated for 84 amp hours. At most you want to use 1/2 of this so consider 40 amp hours the maximum you want to use before recharging. Discharging these batteries below 50% can significantly reduce the life expectancy of the battery.

Although it states this is a deep cycle it is not truly one. Real deep cycle do not have a CCA(cold cranking amps) rating. You might consider getting a 2nd battery of the same specs. Wired together - needs to be done properly so investigate - you will have 80 amp hours of power. To provide context on how much this is the Jayco manual states running the fridge and furnace on 12vDC continuously would use 75 amp hours of power.

Battery usage can be confusing so do not hesitate to ask questions.

Dan in NY
... all good information above.

My 17Z had a group 24 Interstate battery that would provide 76 amp hours, but only half that, that I would use. The only draw when heating with propane is the furnace fan. My inside temperatures could be kept in the low 60's, when the temp outside was in the mid 30's for 8 hours, using about 40% of the battery.

I used the water pump and coach lights VERY little. Both are high draw items, but we only used them for very short times.
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