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Old 11-09-2014, 07:56 AM   #1
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6v vs 12v house batteries

Does anyone know what it is about 6v deep cycle batteries that allows them to store amperage for more hours than a 12v battery?
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Old 11-09-2014, 08:28 AM   #2
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The deep cycle battery is designed to take a long, steady draw at a low to moderate amperage. The lead plates inside are a bit bigger/thicker which explains why the 6V are heavier. This is what helps with the longevity of them.

12V car batteries are the opposite. They are designed to deliver high amps for a short period of time, such as a cold start.

The usual 12V batteries that come stock with these units are like a hybrid battery. They do a little bit of both, but neither very well. I think it's mostly to do with the design of the lead plates inside, and keep in mind that you need two 6V batteries to make 12V so that doubles the amount of better plates right off the bat. The 6V are also a bit taller too.
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Old 11-09-2014, 02:18 PM   #3
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SkyBound's response is pretty much the way it is. The only time you would want to upgrade to TRUE deep cycle batteries is if you are planning on dry camping. If you plan on staying at CC's that provide shore power all the time, then the standard 12 volt marine/RV type battery that comes with the TT will be fine.

Just my thoughts,

Don
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Old 11-09-2014, 03:27 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustang65 View Post
SkyBound's response is pretty much the way it is. The only time you would want to upgrade to TRUE deep cycle batteries is if you are planning on dry camping. If you plan on staying at CC's that provide shore power all the time, then the standard 12 volt marine/RV type battery that comes with the TT will be fine.

Just my thoughts,

Don
Have to disagree a bit with this statement. The standard single 12V that typically come with a new TT will suffice if all you're doing is towing to a State Park or CG with power. That part I agree with. But this formula will leave you "cold" if you travel and overnight during cold weather without shore power. We stopped at a walmart on our way south last Jan and the temp was 22 when we stopped and dropped into the teens overnite. Very early the next am the furnace fan was barely turning and I had to start the tow vehicle and use its 12V feed to warm things up. The onboard furnace / fan is a real 12V hog. We experienced a similar problem when the gulf coast was hit with a freak ice storm with many power outages including the CG we were in. Fortunately the outage only lasted thru one night but intermitten outages over the next 2 or 3 days prevented getting a good charge on the battery. We only had the OEM series 24 battery at the time. Since then I upgraded to a twin 6V settup and will be good to go thru these type circumstances.

People spend a lot of $$ on various creature comfort and functionality items. Adding an inverter for occasional overnites will also require a battery upgrade. In my opinion you should at least add a 2nd 12v but a twin 6v isn't that much more.
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Old 11-10-2014, 10:54 AM   #5
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Mustang and Sky's answers were right on the money. IF you never camp without hookups then what the dealer gave you is ok. However if you ever plan to boondock even one night I would say get a better battery. 2-6's are best but a single 12 will do just do not get a battery that says CCA on it... it is not a true deep cycle.
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Old 11-10-2014, 11:59 AM   #6
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If you are NOT planning on any MAJOR dry-camping (week at a time) I would go with a second 12 volt battery. Just remember that it needs to be the same Mfr, Model, Ahr rating, and use GOOD cable to connect them. The (2) 12 volt batteries, with some energy conservation will last a weekend. (sorry no AC or Microwave..type items) You can always plug in the TV and run it for an hour or so to put a little charge back into it.

Just my thoughts,

Don
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Old 11-10-2014, 12:05 PM   #7
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My Precept came with two 12v batteries. I've been watching tons of utube videos on the subject of dry camping and how to monitor power consumption. It is quite a science and requires a lot of understanding but more importantly, experience. Thanks to all of you for the input.
Chuck
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckandcindy View Post
My Precept came with two 12v batteries. I've been watching tons of utube videos on the subject of dry camping and how to monitor power consumption. It is quite a science and requires a lot of understanding but more importantly, experience. Thanks to all of you for the input.
Chuck
The key things you want to watch:
- The voltage on your battery(s) and not letting them drop below 12VDC.
- Giving them a full charge when needed.
- Watching your batteries water level (distilled water only).

Start off with a Volt meter you can monitor. There are plenty of them on Amazon/ebay. You can always upgrade your monitoring as you go along. Here is a link to some inexpensive meters like the ones I started with.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IDRR25S?psc=1
http://www.amazon.com/RioRand-Digita...ref=pd_cp_hi_3
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/180916808096?...84.m1438.l2649
(The last link is a new one, I have do idea as to how it is rated.)

Just my thoughts,
Don
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Old 11-12-2014, 12:49 AM   #9
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I had 2 GC2 6V batteries on my TT. Eventually I upgraded the system to include 3 more AGM batteries under the bed. The AGMs were installed in such a manner that it allowed them to get the correct charge from the multistage converter and the GC2s to get the charge they needed. In most cases this is difficult to do without a separate battery isolators to allow proper charging. Jayco uses battery trays on the Greyhawk units that will fit a very specific Group 31 AGM battery that has a massive 120AH with a very low internal resistance. The brand is VMCHARGETANK and is available on Amazon for a significant discount over MSRP. If you have two Group 24 batteries in a tray check the measurements of the tray and you may find that you can easily install a larger battery(ies) with no problems. I tend to get the largest batteries that I can fit in the OEM location unless I have modified the system as I did on my old TT by adding a 3KW sine wave inverter. You may also wish to invest in a true digital battery voltage meter so you can better gauge your battery voltage. The other posters are correct that you really don't want your batteries to be discharged to less than 50% capacity if you want maximum life.
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Old 11-12-2014, 07:01 AM   #10
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There ARE 12 volt batteries that are true deep cycle. 6 volt batteries are generally taller in size. Some battery boxes restrict going to 6 volt for that reason. I was forced to keep 12 volt batteries but went to US batteries which are true deep cycle. You look at the AH on 6 volt and say "wow" thats a lot of power. But you need to keep in mind that it takes two 6 volt batteries to get you to that AH. Where a single 12 volt gets to that AH.
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