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Old 03-25-2023, 04:39 PM   #1
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Electrical Technician

In the last few months I have had an RV service center, which on the internet had very good ratings, install two 206ah lithium batteries, a battery monitor, a lithium compatible converter, and a DC-DC charger in my Jayco Sprinter based motor home. Since their installation, when I want to turn on the leisure battery, I have to run the engine for the relay to turn on that power. Never had to do that before. I have a switch to turn off the DC-DC charger when the engine is running. When I turn off the switch to the DC-DC charger, with the engine running, the amount of charging only goes down to about 50% of what it was initially charging. It does not go down to zero like it should. I have taken my motor-home to this dealer twice but still have the above problems. I donít want to throw any more money at them and still not have those issues fixed. The real question is how can I find a RV electrician that can look at the wiring and the way it was installed to be sure that everything is installed properly. Is there some certification I can look for to be sure the electrician can do this properly? Any suggestions?
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Old 03-25-2023, 06:13 PM   #2
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I'm a licensed electrician in the State of Washington (EL01). I can tell you there are no licensing requirements for an RV "electrician" in the US. There maybe trade schools that offer "certificates" for folks that have completed a certain curriculum but these "certificates" are not recognized by any licensing bureau in the US. BUT, that may be a good place to start to what trade schools have the highest accreditation rating and find a graduate from one of those schools. If you can post the full set of schematics for your system and some of us here may be able to help. However, troubleshooting electrical gremlins over an internet forum can be a crap shoot.
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Old 03-26-2023, 04:20 PM   #3
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Thanks Vicr for your prompt reply to my electrical problems. I was not aware there is not an accreditation for RV electrical technicians. I will try to find a trade school with high ratings. Since my rv is no longer "stock" due to the change in batteries and wiring I suspect and know that the wiring has changed. Any suggestions on the equipment I would need to follow the numerous wires going from here to there without spending many hours trying to figure out where they come from and where they go? As an example, I have four red wires going to just one of the two batteries. That is just one terminal of the two batteries. Thanks so much for you time.
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Old 03-27-2023, 09:11 AM   #4
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As Vicr has suggested, go to Jayco's official website. and with your Jayco RV's VIN number, provide it along with the request for all electrical schematics for your model. They will provide free of charge with what they have on file.

At least they (Jayco or other) used red leads to the battery posts! Assuming its the "+" leads, that makes some of it easier, as many of the models and the assemblers used all black wiring for batteries. It is always recommended to splash some red paint on those black leads that connect to positive so you know to put them back to the correct post if they are removed, or wrap them with red electrical tape.
It is not uncommon to have several leads to a positive post. One is for the generator (starting), one connects that house battery to a solenoid used to power inside lights, etc. when the disconnect/connect switch is activated (disconnected battery to the RV side during storage), one lead can be for levelers, a lead to allow that battery to charge off of the engines alternator, etc.

One of the best electrical tools you can but is a volt/ohm meter (or multi-meter). Invest in a good one; don't buy a cheap one.
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Old 03-27-2023, 04:28 PM   #5
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Bucko thanks for your suggestions and information. Looks like the first step is to get the electrical diagram of what Jayco actually put into my Jayco Melbourne. The next step might be to try to follow the wiring that the RV service center put in. That will not be easy as some it is hidden going through various passages and some can only be seen on the underside of the vehicle. I believe they also put in some additional parts.



I am beginning to think I should have done this improvement myself but I was hoping it would be done correctly.
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Old 03-27-2023, 07:01 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FunontheRoad View Post
Bucko thanks for your suggestions and information. Looks like the first step is to get the electrical diagram of what Jayco actually put into my Jayco Melbourne. The next step might be to try to follow the wiring that the RV service center put in. That will not be easy as some it is hidden going through various passages and some can only be seen on the underside of the vehicle. I believe they also put in some additional parts.

I am beginning to think I should have done this improvement myself but I was hoping it would be done correctly.
Certainly frustrating, I do most of my own work but I would hire more if not most of it out, if I trusted those that would be doing the work.

In any case, your statement "When I turn off the switch to the DC-DC charger, with the engine running, the amount of charging only goes down to about 50% of what it was initially charging. It does not go down to zero like it should." makes me believe that they didn't disconnect the existing setup when they added the DC2DC charger. I am not sure on the Sprinter setup, on the Ford there is a relay under the hood that would need to be disconnected if you were to add a DC2DC charger, as the DC2DC charger would take the place of that relay.

Once you get a wiring diagram, feel free to share as knowing more about how they setup the Sprinter would be helpful. ~CA
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Old 03-28-2023, 06:01 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FunontheRoad View Post
Bucko thanks for your suggestions and information. Looks like the first step is to get the electrical diagram of what Jayco actually put into my Jayco Melbourne. The next step might be to try to follow the wiring that the RV service center put in. That will not be easy as some it is hidden going through various passages and some can only be seen on the underside of the vehicle. I believe they also put in some additional parts.



I am beginning to think I should have done this improvement myself but I was hoping it would be done correctly.
In cases where wiring goes through walls and such, making it hard to trace, I use a device I had from the old telephone working days. It's a box that produces a tone (called the toner). You clip it on one side of a wire lead. The second part of the tool setup has a hand held device that has a metal tip, and an LED light and speaker. As you pass this over a series of wires, the speaker warbles (sound), and pressing the tip on the suspect wire lights up the LED.

Hopefully the schematics arrive soon via an email, and will have the color code wires for you listed on the schematic.
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Old 03-28-2023, 03:47 PM   #8
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Hey thanks for the suggestions everyone. I think the idea of a relay that should be disconnected is 100% correct. As mentioned I believe they did not disconnect this. I looked under the hood today but could find no relay but I think it may be by the battery which is between the passenger and driver on my Sprinter chassis. I also think the idea of a tracer to track where the numerous wires go without climbing under and taking apart so many pieces is a great idea. Would a cheaper tracer work for my purposes since I hope I don't have to use it often? I also contacted Jayco to get a wiring diagram of my vehicle. Any other ideas on this project would be welcomed also.
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