Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-27-2016, 05:56 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: fort myers
Posts: 35
EMS installation Seneca

Has anyone installed a hard wire EMS in there Seneca? I have a Progressive 50 amp and would like any suggestion or installation advise.
__________________

richard66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2016, 06:18 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Robbbyr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Akron
Posts: 1,339
I have a 2014 37TS and I did install one in mine. Here I have copied and pasted a post from another thread regarding how I installed mine; it was in response to someone worried about it failing and then not being able to use shorepower:

My PI EMS unit is hardwired, mostly. I have a Seneca, so what I did may not be feasible in a smaller unit with less available working space. My transfer switch is located in an area under the wardrobe in the bedroom. There are two drawers there too, and when I take them out I have good access to that area. Lots of "extra" room to work with.

First a warning. Do not attempt this without being absolutely certain of your line voltage electrical skills. I would go so far as to recommend a qualified electrician be utilized. So endeth the lecture!

Bear with me now:
I took the shoreline cable out of the transfer switch and instead of wiring it directly into the EMS I installed a 4-wire 50-amp female range receptacle in a metal box on the end. Then I took a male range cord (larger gauge wire than even my shoreline) and wired the connection end into the EMS. The molded range plug plugs into the new shoreline receptacle. Out of my EMS I ran a length of the "excess" range cord wire to another identical 4-wire, 50-amp receptacle. Then I used another range cord and wired the connection end into the transfer switch. Both receptacle boxes are right next to each other.

Under normal (protected) operation power comes in the shoreline to the female receptacle, goes into the male plug and through a short cord into the EMS, out of the EMS to another female receptacle, into another male plug and through a short cord and into the genny transfer switch. The way the plugs and receptacles are oriented the male plug terminals are never "hot" if unplugged. Only the receptacles are live when a plug is out. Having live male plugs could be deadly.

If the EMS ever fails, you unplug both male plugs and then take the one now coming into the transfer switch and plug it into the receptacle coming from the shoreline. Then you have restored the electrical system to the way Jayco gave it to us, save a receptacle and plug in between.

I sourced all my materials from my local Home Depot and had it done in a couple of hours. Working with the stiff, large gauge conductors was the worst part. While I have put extra connection points into my system, they are inside where weather won't be an issue. And they also will seldom, (hopefully never) be repeatedly removed and reinserted which might cause wear and increased resistance. I even metered the resistance between the shoreline plug (extended it into coach!) and the EMS input after going through one plug. No change in resistance at all. I could not check all legs all the way to the generator transfer switch because the EMS won't close (create a connection) without seeing voltage and the correct electrical conditions. But I am certain resistance-wise I am just as good as stock.

This won't work for everyone and does entail some expense, but it does give me peace of mind that if my EMS does fail (protecting me?) I can still use shore power until I get it fixed.
__________________
__________________

__________________
Rob R.
Akron, OH
2014 Seneca 37TS
Toads: 2014 Ford Explorer Sport or 2013 Ford Focus ST
Robbbyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2016, 07:10 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
SparkDr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Lake George, NY
Posts: 265
Everything seems all well and good as far as the processes and procedures in your project, but I have to question why you went to such trouble. Unless I am missing something, there is a bypass capability included on all of the PI EMS units. The remote display has a bypass button on it and the units without a remote display are bypassed simply by plugging in the female spade connector on the blue wire at the contactor inside the unit. If not wanting to open the unit while energized, a $5 toggle switch can be installed directly onto the housing of the EMS to accomplish the same thing. Is there more to the story somewhere?
__________________
Ode to the Forum Moderators

May the Mods grant me the serenity to accept the opinions of those I cannot change,
the courage to offer valid input to those who are open to another way of thinking,
and the wisdom to shut myself down whenever I get too in love with my own misconceived brilliance.
SparkDr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2016, 07:33 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Robbbyr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Akron
Posts: 1,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by SparkDr View Post
Everything seems all well and good as far as the processes and procedures in your project, but I have to question why you went to such trouble. Unless I am missing something, there is a bypass capability included on all of the PI EMS units. The remote display has a bypass button on it and the units without a remote display are bypassed simply by plugging in the female spade connector on the blue wire at the contactor inside the unit. If not wanting to open the unit while energized, a $5 toggle switch can be installed directly onto the housing of the EMS to accomplish the same thing. Is there more to the story somewhere?
Friends had the identical unit and were camping when a thunderstorm fried their hardwired EMS, and despite using the bypass switch they had no power coming into their unit. They removed it and returned it to PI and they repaired it for free. Apparently the surge was so severe it burned up the contactor that closes and allows power to pass through when proper conditions are met. Operating the bypass switch on the remote display did not do a thing, the remote display was dead too until the new EMS unit was installed. They had to use the generator for AC until they left for home. Probably an extreme example of what might happen. But they had no damage to their rig or appliances, so apparently it sacrificed itself.

Maybe my Navy and Fire Department careers make me always plan for backups for the backup!
__________________
Rob R.
Akron, OH
2014 Seneca 37TS
Toads: 2014 Ford Explorer Sport or 2013 Ford Focus ST
Robbbyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2016, 07:46 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: smithville, ont.
Posts: 1,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robbbyr View Post
Friends had the identical unit and were camping when a thunderstorm fried their hardwired EMS, and despite using the bypass switch they had no power coming into their unit. They removed it and returned it to PI and they repaired it for free. Apparently the surge was so severe it burned up the contactor that closes and allows power to pass through when proper conditions are met. Operating the bypass switch on the remote display did not do a thing, the remote display was dead too until the new EMS unit was installed. They had to use the generator for AC until they left for home. Probably an extreme example of what might happen. But they had no damage to their rig or appliances, so apparently it sacrificed itself.

Maybe my Navy and Fire Department careers make me always plan for backups for the backup!
Wonder what happened to the rest of the folks that were camping without an EMS
__________________
2016 North Point 341RLTS
520watts of solar. Morningstar MPPT
2017 F-350 Platinum CC SRW
klassic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2016, 07:52 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Robbbyr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Akron
Posts: 1,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by klassic View Post
Wonder what happened to the rest of the folks that were camping without an EMS
I cannot say, but I have to guess it wasn't good!
__________________
Rob R.
Akron, OH
2014 Seneca 37TS
Toads: 2014 Ford Explorer Sport or 2013 Ford Focus ST
Robbbyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2016, 07:54 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
SparkDr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Lake George, NY
Posts: 265
Gonna give a bump to the thread in hopes the OP can get some help with the original question. We kinda hijacked things there for a bit. Sorry.
__________________
Ode to the Forum Moderators

May the Mods grant me the serenity to accept the opinions of those I cannot change,
the courage to offer valid input to those who are open to another way of thinking,
and the wisdom to shut myself down whenever I get too in love with my own misconceived brilliance.
SparkDr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2016, 07:35 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: fort myers
Posts: 35
Thanks Robbyr for some great suggestions and tips. I have a 2014 36FK and will use your suggestions.
__________________

richard66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.