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Old 01-31-2015, 10:39 AM   #1
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Greyhawk 31 on Sloped Driveway

My driveway has about a 10 degree slope, but it is a flat surface. By that I mean there is no "curve", it's a straight/smooth slope (think hypotenuse of a right triangle). To park a 31 footer in my driveway I'll need a pretty good lift of my front tires in order to make it level - I'm guessing around 10"-12". I know that's pushing the limit. Here's my question, how much front axle lift is too much relative to the rear of the MH, which will obviously drop down with the rear axle being the pivot point, I'm concerned about just how much I can realistically pick up the front, especially given how long it is beyond the rear axle.

Anyone with any similar experiences?
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Old 01-31-2015, 11:02 AM   #2
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If you have the Bigfoot levelers, they have a max lift. If you are on too steep of a slope, they will not even attempt to level the coach.
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Old 01-31-2015, 11:43 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csyrell View Post
My driveway has about a 10 degree slope, but it is a flat surface. By that I mean there is no "curve", it's a straight/smooth slope (think hypotenuse of a right triangle). To park a 31 footer in my driveway I'll need a pretty good lift of my front tires in order to make it level - I'm guessing around 10"-12". I know that's pushing the limit. Here's my question, how much front axle lift is too much relative to the rear of the MH, which will obviously drop down with the rear axle being the pivot point, I'm concerned about just how much I can realistically pick up the front, especially given how long it is beyond the rear axle.

Anyone with any similar experiences?
No similar experience, sorry.

It sounds like you are asking how far can you pick up the front before the rear hits the driveway. You may get close by measuring how far the rear can 'drop' before hitting the driveway. Then use the ratio of the length from the pivot point (rear axle) to where the rear hit and the pivot point the front tires to find how far the front would have to raise.

It could give you a starting point and may let you know where you need to go from there. Good luck. Hopefully someone here will have had a similar experience.
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Old 02-02-2015, 08:49 AM   #4
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I am assuming you are pulling into your drive and the slope is down 10 degrees. Is there anyway you can back in to your drive? The Greyhawks all sit a little nose down anyway. Hard to answer this question without seeing it. But if necesaary build you some sturdy ramps and level it out. whether it is 10"or 12" is irrelevant. If you level by raising the the front just make sure that nothing in the back end is scraping or touching the slope.
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Old 02-02-2015, 11:28 AM   #5
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I am assuming you are pulling into your drive and the slope is down 10 degrees. Is there anyway you can back in to your drive? The Greyhawks all sit a little nose down anyway. Hard to answer this question without seeing it. But if necesaary build you some sturdy ramps and level it out. whether it is 10"or 12" is irrelevant. If you level by raising the the front just make sure that nothing in the back end is scraping or touching the slope.
Yes, slopes down from from Garage (high) to Road (low). I plan to back it in. My concern is that 10"-12" might end up being relevant as there is some point where you can't lift the front wheels any more without the back end bottoming out. Plan B would be to drive it in forward to the driveway, and then back the rear up onto ramps. That would allow for a higher lift since the front wheels are closer to the front of the cab, and thus less likely for the front to hit the driveway. Obviously not the preferred way since then the braked wheels are not on the driveway, but on the ramp.

This is why I'm asking, how high is too high to expect to be able to lift the front wheels before having the rear bottom out.
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Old 02-02-2015, 12:16 PM   #6
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The ratio method should give you a good idea, how much lift you can go. then have someone watch the under carriage while you are doing it.

I would make some large leveling pad/ramps. I made one for out TT for our old house, to lift the curb side 7 inches. I now need to make two for our new place but have not, as our driveway is very sloped. If I made one for your MH, I would add a stop block (built in wheel chock) to the one side so you do not accidently roll off of it. On mine I made a series of ramp steps, so one wheel was fully on one level before attempting to lift up to the next level. My 7” lift block for a double axle TT is about 7’-8' long, all screwed together.

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Old 02-02-2015, 12:46 PM   #7
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I could figure this if I knew the center to center dimension of the wheels, the height from the ground to the lowest part of the chassis and center of rear wheel to back of bumper..

I bet it is more than 12" before it would cause bottoming out. I would consider driving in like normal and building blocks for the rear. You will end up raising the back less than you would the front. Put wheel chocks on the front tires as well.




Quote:
Originally Posted by csyrell View Post
Yes, slopes down from from Garage (high) to Road (low). I plan to back it in. My concern is that 10"-12" might end up being relevant as there is some point where you can't lift the front wheels any more without the back end bottoming out. Plan B would be to drive it in forward to the driveway, and then back the rear up onto ramps. That would allow for a higher lift since the front wheels are closer to the front of the cab, and thus less likely for the front to hit the driveway. Obviously not the preferred way since then the braked wheels are not on the driveway, but on the ramp.

This is why I'm asking, how high is too high to expect to be able to lift the front wheels before having the rear bottom out.
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Old 03-16-2015, 09:24 PM   #8
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Have same drive way. Put our grathawk on car ramps super easy. Its enough lift so the frig would still work. And we could getvin and out of it.
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Old 04-02-2015, 12:06 AM   #9
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I assume the street is level. And if your driveway slope (up to the garage) is constant, theoretically if you can back in without the rear hitting the driveway, you should be able to level it without the rear hitting the driveway. As far as jacks vs ramps? What do the leveling jack people say about lifting wheels off the ground? I personally try to avoid that, but might be ok for short term. Be sure your rear brakes are set and wheels chocked.
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Old 04-17-2015, 10:40 AM   #10
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Not sure what system you have, but I have the big foot system. I called the manufacturer and was told not to worry about weight distribution as each jack is rated for 8000 pounds. If the any of the jacks looks like they are extended more than you want, I would suggest putting some wood blocks under the jacks.
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