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Old 11-07-2019, 11:28 AM   #1
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Propane question while intransit?

OK... I'm actually pretty embarrassed to ask this, but since this is our 1st motorhome & I've read numerous articles on the topic, I'm more confused after the fact because verdict seems to be about 50/50.

I've read it's not good to have your propane tank on while traveling on the road. If true, how does one keep their refrigerator cool, esp for longer trips in warm climates? We use to leave our frig in auto all the time with our TT & propane kept it cool while on the road, is it different for motorhomes?

Thoughts?
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:39 AM   #2
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Youíre going to get a lot of opinions on this. Just like which truck is best, gas vs diesel, etc.
Thatís why youíre getting such varying opinions.
If you want to avoid the scrutiny and propane shaming you may get, you can run the fridge on 110v using your onboard genny.

Personally I donít see a problem with it but others may. Only caveat is to turn it off when getting fuel.
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Old 11-07-2019, 11:51 AM   #3
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That's funny! I was a bit hesitant to start this thread in that, this topic does seem wide open.

Thxs for your feedback & heads-up!
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Old 11-07-2019, 12:27 PM   #4
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It is a hot topic, just like discussing oil for an old car.

Modern propane tanks and connection points have a lot of safety devices built in to them, to keep from having any accidents. Keep your system in good shape all they way from the appliance to the back end of the tank and you will be good to go.

An example of one of the safety devices is a free flow prevention valve. If a hose gets ruptured, the gas flow rate increases. The valve senses the high flow rate, then shuts off the flow of gas. That is its job. It can be really annoying on a 20/30# propane tank if you open the valve quickly.

There are some areas where you do need to have the propane turned off, such as gas stations, and some tunnels.
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Old 11-07-2019, 01:23 PM   #5
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You've read a lot so I won't repeat. The one thing I did was to put a thermometer in the fridge and test the temperature drop over 5 hours. When we we travel for long time/distances (we do not keep the propane on) we always put a few frozen water bottles next to "sensitive" objects.
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Old 11-07-2019, 02:07 PM   #6
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Youíre going to get a lot of opinions on this. .
X-2 and in over 40 yrs, with 14 yrs traveling in a MH, always left the fridge running on propane.
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Old 11-07-2019, 02:51 PM   #7
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X-2 and in over 40 yrs, with 14 yrs traveling in a MH, always left the fridge running on propane.


X2 also !! It is built to do so.
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Old 11-07-2019, 02:53 PM   #8
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25 years with fridge running on propane while driving in my old Lance camper and 3 years with my new Greyhawk. Never a problem.

If you are concerned while gassing up you can always temporarily shut off the fridge while at the gas station. I don't do this as my gas fill is on the opposite side of the fridge. It takes a lot of fumes to blow up so unless you are pouring gas all over the place, the fridge flame should not be an issue.

I think there are some states that have issues with propane ion tunnels so that may be something to look at. Not in my area though.
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Old 11-07-2019, 04:25 PM   #9
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Thank you everyone for your feedback, much appreciated!

Haven't taken out on road yet, still testing everything & working out a few issues. We'll be doing some dry camping @ track soon, so battery upgrade is on the to-do list as well (why didn't they make that darn step compartment capable of holding the 6-volt batteries)???
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:54 PM   #10
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I like to think of it this way.... If it were wrong, or a bad thing to drive with your propane fridge running... California would have banned it, regulated it - or Taxed it!

Since California has not banned driving with a Propane Fridge on... it must be OK!

Full Disclosure: I was born in California, lived there more years than I can remember - not dissing the state of every law and regulation known to man.
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:37 PM   #11
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Like your logic & absolutely no defense taken!

Still live in Califonia, agree with you completely in regards to regulations & taxes...retiring in another state is sounding more appealing each year, assuming we'll be able to afford gas to get us across state lines...
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Old 11-07-2019, 08:22 PM   #12
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propanne

In response to having propane on ,I have ran for the past 8 years are DP with valve on as we ran fridge and in winter both furnaces on while sleeping and driving in January. And also running our Seneca the same way as we normally sleep in it at storage before leaving for south and average temp -30 will be a good test for this unit
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:21 AM   #13
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Understanding what effects the flash point of fuel (gasoline) is why one would close their propane tanks. Many believe the ignition of gasoline (while fueling) caused by the refrigerator starting is the reason for closing the valve on your propane tanks. Has it ever occurred? Yes. However it would have to be a very, very hot day, while fueling, pooled gasoline, and heavy vapors. Like over 110 degrees. Could it happen sure.

People leave the gas pump running and go into the station to do what ever, faith believing the safety feature on the handle will shut off the flow of fuel.

Not understanding the parameters that make fuel dangerous is, well, dangerous.

Movies over glorify pitching a cigarette onto pooling gasoline and combustion occurring is Hollywood. As the scientist in me I have on many occasions tried this and the pooling gasoline puts the cigarette out.

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Old 11-08-2019, 10:46 AM   #14
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While I'm not exactly a seasoned owner like some here, 1yr owner to be honest, I've been leaving my propane on while traveling and not turning it off while getting gas or any other reason for that matter. My gas fill is on the opposite side of the fridge so I just don't see how it could ever ignite. The only time I turn my tank off is when I'm not using the Greyhawk, but if we're using it, it's on...

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Old 11-13-2019, 01:28 PM   #15
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I posted this topic on this forum once, and got seriously "flamed" (no pun intended). Don't be surprised if you get the same treatment, DnTmor.

For the record, I always drive with our LP on and frig running. Never had an issue. I do tend to inspect things regularly and that includes the vulnerable parts of the propane system.
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Old 11-13-2019, 01:42 PM   #16
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No need to be embarrassed. If you don’t ask you won’t know.
No doubt you’ll be inundated with answers and opinions but bottom line, it’s a an RV/Travel Trailer...whatever you have it’s designed to be used while traveling and the propane systems are designed accordingly.
I see posts on here from users that state they never travel with full fresh water tanks or never leave a site with full holding tanks. Again, opinions and I respect their preferences but why buy a vehicle designed to be a mobile habitat and not take advantages of the built in features. If I was going to do that, I’d save the RV cost and just drive to motels.

Enjoy!!!
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:45 PM   #17
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My college job was working at a delivery restaurant. Our delivery cars had a propane bottle in the back seat and a "hot box" to keep the food warm until we got to the customer. The main tank to refill the bottles was in the store. I was the Tuesday manager when the owner took off. When I graduated and got an engineering job, the boss put a "kid" in charge on my day. On his first day he burned down the store, the delivery cars and a couple of workers. The boss didn't explain to him the importance of turning the tank off.

The people down the street had a small fire in the house. The propane grill was in the garage, where the fire spread to. The small fire ended up blowing the whole house up. The tank was always on, so when the fire burned thru the hose it was full pressure to the fire.

A simple factory fire was easily being attended by the fire department. A large propane tank blew up, destroying several fire engines and killed several fire fighters.

Propane is dangerous. You cannot take enough precautions to be safe. Nuff said.

OK, off my soapbox. Do as you like because you've done it that way for years.
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Old 11-13-2019, 04:05 PM   #18
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Yes, propane can be dangerous, but what do the above extreme examples have to do with leaving your refrigerator on while traveling? From the sound of it, maybe we shouldn't use propane at all--for any reason!

I'm 74 and have been using propane for one reason or another for over 60 years, including leaving my TT refrigerator on. Nothing ever went boom.
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Old 11-13-2019, 04:21 PM   #19
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Actually it is exactly the same for both motorhomes and tt's. The general recommendation for all RV's of all types is to travel with the propane tanks turned off. Does everyone do that? Of course not. We didn't for years, but in our old age and travelling with dogs in crates (cages) in the RV we got more cautious. We have found that the fridge will keep stuff cold throughout an all day trip even in warm climates. Hot climates are a different story but we typically don't drive more than five or six hours on any day and we've never felt the stuff in the fridge didn't stay cold.
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Old 11-13-2019, 04:42 PM   #20
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Yes, propane can be dangerous, but what do the above extreme examples have to do with leaving your refrigerator on while traveling? From the sound of it, maybe we shouldn't use propane at all--for any reason!

I'm 74 and have been using propane for one reason or another for over 60 years, including leaving my TT refrigerator on. Nothing ever went boom.
I'm sorry if I alarmed you. No problem with the fridge. Keep doing what you have been doing. No problem.

Whatever the topic, I always recommend reading the book and doing what they say.
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