Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-06-2017, 07:52 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 509
Cool Seneca 37FS Storage Compartment Latch Broke

Yep, had a latch to one of the storage compartments break. I couldn't open the storage compartment, so What Do You Do?

Well, it was the compartment for the propane tank, so its open from underneath and I got under the coach and with a screw driver I could force the latch open and investigate what went wrong.

Took the latch apart, 4 screws from the inside and found the white metal casting latch piston broke. I've been in to these latches on a couple of doors, but usually that is because it wouldn't activate and latch, this was the opposite, it wouldn't open. The pull latch on the outside was not touching anything, no friction at all.

For latches that won't latch or lock, my fix is to disassemble down to the Phillips screw that has worked loose and put it back tighter with a little Blue Loctite. Seems to be a workable fix.

Got on the phone to my dealer right away and have new one coming, plus a spare. Complete mechanism has to be ordered, but I just need the piston/latch part. So be it.

Now I'm prepping to travel home for Christmas and I've got a couple of questions floating through the grey matter. What if the part doesn't get here in time? I need to be able to get in to that compartment, its where I will need to fill the propane tank and we are going to colder parts of this Country. Once I close the door, I may have to reopen it.

So lets have some fun, I've worked out my solutions for this time and for the future, but what would you do?

How about another compartment, that has a solid bottom, how would you get it open? I've got an idea, how about you.

So I've figured a couple of different solutions and temporary fixes.

I'll let this sit for a couple of days and then post my thoughts and solutions by the end of the weekend.

Stay tuned.
__________________

__________________
Smooth Sailing,
Ric and Jan Golding
Southern Illinois
2016 Jayco Seneca 37FS
rgolding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2017, 05:45 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Denver
Posts: 97
Solution

I would start with a 1985 delorian and a flux capacitor. Obtaining 1.21 gigawatts I would travel back in time two weeks and order a replacement. Then, go "back to the future" one day prior to failure and integrate the new latch.
__________________

__________________
Ryan, Maria, and Riley (Golden Retriever)
2018 Jayco Seneca 37TS
McGintys924 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2017, 06:30 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Davie, Fl.
Posts: 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by McGintys924 View Post
I would start with a 1985 delorian and a flux capacitor. Obtaining 1.21 gigawatts I would travel back in time two weeks and order a replacement. Then, go "back to the future" one day prior to failure and integrate the new latch.
Wow, great suggestion! I would probably start with a haligan and sledge. Yes, I would cause extensive damage, probably thousands of dollars worth. But I would get in and feel good about it for about a minute. Then I would be wishing for that flux capacitor.

Ok, I really do want to know the answer. I know it will happen.

And when I order the new latch I will be happy that it will not need to be painted. Lol
__________________
Mark and Joanne
2018 Jayco Seneca 37TS
2014 Jeep Wrangler Sport
Mark S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2017, 10:51 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Orange County
Posts: 8
You could always put an access panel in the bottom much like the water closet access or the electrical connection access.
brtnsnwbrds10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2017, 05:59 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 509
Quote:
Originally Posted by brtnsnwbrds10 View Post
You could always put an access panel in the bottom much like the water closet access or the electrical connection access.
I thought of that, but I always have so much in my storage compartments that something would always be sitting on top of the access port. Your on the right track, but need a better location that the floor of the compartment.
__________________
Smooth Sailing,
Ric and Jan Golding
Southern Illinois
2016 Jayco Seneca 37FS
rgolding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2017, 05:53 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 509
Wow! I really thought more of you would have chimed in. I'll lay the plans for my temporary fix, so I can go down the road and still get in the propane tank compartment and my possible solution if it happens to another compartment that isn't open on the bottom, in the future, on Sunday, the 10th.

Think about it, how you going to continue to travel with a broken door latch, that you currently have open, but when you close it, you can't get it open again?

Or how are you going to continue that well planned trip that is getting totally messed up by a piece of pot metal. Its not going to stop me and I hope we can come up with a potential plan that makes it, that a piece of pot metal won't stop you.
__________________
Smooth Sailing,
Ric and Jan Golding
Southern Illinois
2016 Jayco Seneca 37FS
rgolding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 07:52 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 509
Okay, its Sunday morning. Here's my solution to the problem of a broken door latch and how to get in to the compartment, if the latch mechanism is broke and will not open.

This happened to us and I was fortunate enough to have it happen on the propane tank locker, which is open on the bottom. I was able to crawl under the coach and get a straight blade screwdriver in to a position to open the latch. Once its open, you can tear into the latch unit by removing the 4 screws on the back. In my case, I found the main pot-metal bracket broken at the weak point and immediately ordered another one from my dealer. In fact, I ordered 2, so I would have a spare. Never expect something like this to only happen once.

So part is ordered and until it gets here, I'm kind of just holding the door shut with a trucker's strap. BUT, we are planning to travel on Thursday and by then I need to be ready to move, even if the part hasn't arrived. My solution is to exchange the latch with another latch that I don't use as much. Since we are in Florida and going to move up to Alabama for the Holidays to be closer to home and the propane tank is a compartment, I want to be in quite often in cooler temps. My plan is to exchange the latch with the one to the battery compartment. Its open on the bottom and I hardly ever get in there.

That's my temporary solution, but what about the compartments that have a solid bottom? I have lots of stuff in all the compartments and trying to find an open spot on the bottom big enough to drill a hole and reach in to work the latch with a screwdriver is iffy. But on the wall, right by the latch and this is much more likely to be a space to get a tool and hand in the problem compartment.

There are a couple of compartments that do not have a wall shared with another compartment and these may require the drilling from the bottom and if stuff is laying in the compartment, it might need to be quite a large hole to be able to move stuff around to get access to the latch.

Black plastic can be found to fill in the access space you created. My favorite is the cheap cutting boards, you can find in the big box stores. Yes, it is usually white, but so easy to cut and work with simple hand tools and files. it makes a very nice access panel. Held in place with machine screws and caulkiing its ready for the next time, stuff happens. Yes, if you keep the coach long enough, there will be a next time.

Pre-planning is what we always said and used in the USCG. "Semper Paratus - Always Ready", makes it that things don't have to be a panic, a disaster or doom and gloom. Its just life and living it. I hope this documentation helps somebody in the future.
__________________
Smooth Sailing,
Ric and Jan Golding
Southern Illinois
2016 Jayco Seneca 37FS
rgolding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 11:24 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Crossingover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Stuart
Posts: 192
Interesting your propane door is lockable; it shouldn't be for safety (emergency shut off valve access) reasons. My current and former MHs did not have lockable propane bays. Is the latch receiver accessible from the adjacent bay? If so wonder if you can unbolt it to free up the locked door. Do you see drilling out the lock as an option?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Rick with Lori, Two Pekes and a Shih Tzu
16 'HJ' Jayco Seneca 37 Topaz
16 'JK' Jeep Wrangler Sahara Unlimited : Falcon All-Terrain tether
08 Fleetwood Bounder 38P (gone but not forgotten)
Crossingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 11:36 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Crossingover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Stuart
Posts: 192
Wonder if we should be more careful when closing the door to minimize failure? Thinking pull back the handle and slowly release it once the door is held shut with the seals compressed.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Rick with Lori, Two Pekes and a Shih Tzu
16 'HJ' Jayco Seneca 37 Topaz
16 'JK' Jeep Wrangler Sahara Unlimited : Falcon All-Terrain tether
08 Fleetwood Bounder 38P (gone but not forgotten)
Crossingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2017, 06:09 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 509
The propane door is not lockable and the broken part has nothing to do with the key. So drilling out the key would do no good. The part of the latch that broke is the main piston, that is angled at one end and actually is the part of the latch that holds the door shut.

Yes, I would agree that we need to be careful when closing the doors and not slam them. I never slam, but I have just closed expecting it to shut. This particular door latch has always been a little difficult and I'm constantly pulling on the "Bail" to align correctly. I've never have justified why this "bail" reacts different than all the others.

I'm using the word "bail" to describe the wire attachment point on the door jam that the "latch", the part that broke attaches to. The "latch" is the "piston" that is the moving part of the lock that moves when the handle is pulled and has the slanted surface that rubs against the "bail" and is held behind the "bail" to hold the door shut.
__________________

__________________
Smooth Sailing,
Ric and Jan Golding
Southern Illinois
2016 Jayco Seneca 37FS
rgolding is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.