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Old 07-28-2012, 06:55 AM   #11
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There has been several misconceptions posted in this thread. I will attempt to challenge a few.

1. Jayco's recommendation to not use a 50 amp receptacle most likely comes from their lawyers. There is no safety issue involved.

2. Using the 50 amp receptacle with a 50 amp to 30 amp dogbone is proper if the 30 amp receptacle is worn to the point the connection is poor.

3. Using the 50 amp receptacle does not alter your protection. Your RV still has the 30 amp main breaker for protection.

4. Using a 30 amp to 50 amp dogbone to connect your 50 amp RV to a 30 amp receptacle will allow everything in your RV to work except anything that required 220 volts. And you will be limited to 30 amps total.

5. Using the 50 amp receptacle for better voltage because you believe everyone else is using the 30 amp receptacles is not a valid idea. Campgrounds lay out their circuits such that all pedestals that have a 50 amp/220V receptacle will place the 30 amp/110V receptacle on one leg of the 220 volt circuit. The next site will have its 30 amp receptacle on the other leg. Thereby equalizing the load throughout the park.

I hope this helps with some understanding the issue with 30/50 amp adapters and their usage.
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Old 07-28-2012, 09:43 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnchuck100 View Post

4. Using a 30 amp to 50 amp dogbone to connect your 50 amp RV to a 30 amp receptacle will allow everything in your RV to work except anything that required 220 volts. And you will be limited to 30 amps total.

I don't have a 5er, but I do have another vehicle that has a 220 connection. Not sure how yours are wired, but since it is actually 2 110 circuits, several of my outlets and appliances are split between the legs....for instance it has 2 ac units - one on each leg. I would assume at least the ac units are the same for those folks with dual ac.

Anyway - if you have a 50 amp connection and you think you will ever camp on a 30....I would test it out before you get a surprise when you actually hook up....
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:13 PM   #13
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Tnchuck100; I will agree with you on everything except points 2& 3; unless the dogbone has a 30 amp breaker in it.

I’m probably not going to explain it as I could, but as an engineer, I would NEVER allow one of my machines that I design and build to be wired with a 50 amp breaker unless the power feed (wire) be of the correct gauge. Wire (aka power feed) length has a lot to do with what gauge wire is required for the application. The power feed on my trailer appears to be about 16 feet which requires an 8 gauge stranded wire or greater. 4 gauge wire is required for a 16 foot power feed at 50 amps. Just because you have a 30 amp breaker downstream does not mean you are properly protected between the pedestal and the internal breaker. You can still melt the insulation on the 8 gauge wire cable and not blow either breaker. My power feed cable is shoved into a small wood box, deep inside a wall cavity, you would never know if there was an issue in there until it is too late.

With that said, get a dogbone with a 30 amp breaker in it, or make one.
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Old 07-30-2012, 05:59 AM   #14
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Jaygiven, from an engineering/theoretical perspective you may be right. My comments are based on practical, real life issues.

I will clarify one thing first. This thread was started based on a 30 amp RV. That is what my comments refer to.

Justification for #2: It is better to have a GOOD, POSITIVE 50 amp receptacle connection than a POOR, OVERHEATING 30 amp one. Getting a new site or pedestal is seldom an viable option. I have never seen anyone with a breaker equipped dogbone.

Justification for #3: The 30 amp breaker in the RV still protects your RV. Your wire size does not need to be increased simply because the supply capacity has increased. You are STILL limited to 30 amps by the RV breaker. The breakers at the pedestal are there to protect the park equipment not your RV.

The odds of having a problem between the pedestal and the RV breaker (the cable itself) is extremely remote. Assuming the cable is not damaged in some way. Even if the cable did fault the 50 amp breaker at the pedestal would still trip.

I, too, have a background in electrical.
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:19 PM   #15
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Chuck , Double thanks for the explanation, even I understand this info.

Good luck to all!

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Old 07-30-2012, 07:30 PM   #16
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On my last TT , which I had stored and used at the same campground for almost 8 years, I had to replace the 30 amp male end that goes into the cg breaker box. The prongs had been burnt. I assume this was a result of the cg breaker box. Guess it might be overheating as Chuck stated. I replaced it several years ago and replaced it again before I traded it in. I never used a dogbone on it, but a salesman at camping world told me I should. I wish I knew who was correct here, because I think the dogbone would help protect my 30 amp male end.
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Old 07-30-2012, 08:23 PM   #17
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..... I wish I knew who was correct here, because I think the dogbone would help protect my 30 amp male end.
Look at it this way if a dogbone was inherently unsafe the lawyers for the corporations that manufacture and sell them would not let their client market them.

I'll re-state there is theory and there is practical application. Just don't try to jury-rig electric stuff. Use the adapters for what they are designed to do and you should have no problem.

Hope this helps the wary.
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