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Old 10-25-2015, 12:35 PM   #11
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Both jack and leaf spring methods are going to temporarily overload one or the suspension sides. If you are fixing a flat, then the other tire is already bearing all the load, running it up a ramp isn't going to hurt much more than what is already done. A bottle jack under the leaf spring mount on the flat tire axle is going to overload that spring as you have to take almost all the load off the other wheel to get your new wheel on. A jack on the frame rail preferably between the axles is likely the most effective location as it is already carrying most of that point load anyway.


But for convenience, nothing beats using the ramp or trailer aid you already have on hand anyway.


To be honest the only time I've had a flat was with my single axle pup, and I called CAA (AAA) to change it for me. I couldn't afford the weight of a jack in a small pup trailer and have RV Plus coverage anyway. Was back on the road in about 30 minutes.
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Old 10-25-2015, 06:12 PM   #12
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Well that seems to make good sense. I guess there's lots of ways to change an rv tire. Thanks much!
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Old 10-25-2015, 07:37 PM   #13
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In my opinion, A jack under the axle at the leaf spring pirch puts no more stress on the spring than driving over a speed bump....it only needs jacked up about an inch higher than the other axle to change the tire....and the jack is supporting the weight vs driving up a ramp and unloading the spring with the axle hanging there.

As I said before, Ive done both. Depends on the situation...
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Old 10-25-2015, 08:16 PM   #14
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I changed a tire just last month on the side of the road and I put the jack under the u bolt for the spring. Since 1974 I have changed 3 flats and have never had any problem. I don't think this causes any more stress than driving.
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Old 10-25-2015, 11:21 PM   #15
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A bottle jack under the spring perch is simple. The reason that mfgs say no to jacking up on the axle is that there's too many ignorant owners that would stick the jack to far towards the center of the axle and bending it. Putting a jack under the spring perch does zero damage to the axle. You only need to jack it up 1" or so to get the tire off.
Thanks for clarifying that. I always jacked up as close as possible to the out side or under the spring perch. I never could figure why they said to never jack up the axle until you cleared it up, thanks. You don't have to jack as high doing it this way.
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Old 10-26-2015, 10:19 AM   #16
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[QUOTE=bankr63;350871]Both jack and leaf spring methods are going to temporarily overload one or the suspension sides. If you are fixing a flat, then the other tire is already bearing all the load, running it up a ramp isn't going to hurt much more than what is already done. A bottle jack under the leaf spring mount on the flat tire axle is going to overload that spring as you have to take almost all the load off the other wheel to get your new wheel on. A jack on the frame rail preferably between the axles is likely the most effective location as it is already carrying most of that point load anyway.


But for convenience, nothing beats using the ramp or trailer aid you already have on hand anyway.


To be honest the only time I've had a flat was with my single axle pup, and I called CAA (AAA) to change it for me. I couldn't afford the weight of a jack in a small pup trailer and have RV Plus coverage anyway. Was back on the road in about 30 minutes.[/QUOTE

Putting a jack under the spring perch on an axle with an already flat tire does not put more stress on that spring. That spring is unloaded as the flat ire is not carrying any weight. The good tire is carrying all the weight. Putting a bottle jack under the spring perch on the flat tire will remove some weight from the good tires axle, creating less stress on that axle.
You don't take almost all the load off the other wheel when replacing the flat tire. You do that when you use the Trailer Aid. Using the trailer aid lifts the bad tire up causing the good tire to support the whole load of that side of the trailer. If you use a bottle jack you're supporting the trailer with both springs. No different than driving up a 1-1/2" driveway entrance bump. Heck I've driven over frost heaved bumps in a camp ground that were 2-3" high.
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Old 10-26-2015, 11:28 AM   #17
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On my way to AZ last week I had a tire blow on the trailer luckily no damage except the plastic trim. Ended up replacing all four tires. I used the Bigfoot leveling system to pick up all four at the same time to change the tires . Nice and level made it easy.
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:44 PM   #18
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On my way to AZ last week I had a tire blow on the trailer luckily no damage except the plastic trim. Ended up replacing all four tires. I used the Bigfoot leveling system to pick up all four at the same time to change the tires . Nice and level made it easy.

That's cheatin.
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Old 10-26-2015, 01:58 PM   #19
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both the guy that changed the tire and the tire shop was impressed .
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Old 10-26-2015, 04:14 PM   #20
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A related question:

I would like to get ALL 4 tires off at the same time. Originally I was thinking of using 2 pairs of jack stands; one set on the frame just in front of the front axle, and one set just behind the rear axle. Get the trailer jacked up a little, place the jack stands, then run the stab jacks and tongue jack down to get as much support under the rig as possible. Then jack up each axle at each end to take off each tire/wheel and let the axles hang.

Then I can do what I need to do and reverse the process. Thoughts? Should I just suck it up and do them 2 at a time? Or hell, maybe one at a time?
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