Jayco RV Owners Forum
 



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-08-2018, 06:21 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: DFW
Posts: 167
Full timers?

Would like to here from some Full timers. Wife and I are aggressively considering it. Would like to here some pros and cons, things to consider, realistic 5th wheel size and any additional valuable input.

Thanks
__________________

__________________
David & Beth Fitzpatrick. Witten our 3yr Golden Retreiver.
2018 Jayco Whitehawk 23MRB
2010 GMC Sierra 1500, 150,000 miles
Smurf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 05:31 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
MadJoker TX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Missouri City
Posts: 333
Same here, this is something my wife and I are looking to do in our 377, so if anyone has input that would be awesome.
__________________

__________________
____________________
2017 Ford F350 FX4 DRW
2017 NorthPoint 377RLBH
MadJoker TX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 05:47 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Screwby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Full Timer
Posts: 490
Been doing it for over a year now, any specific concerns? I’m more than happy to give advise, needed or not lol. Just remember, the bigger the 5er the les amount of places you can fit. On the flip side, the smaller the 5er, the more you’ll be in each other’s faces. I don’t care how much your family loves each other, alone time is paramount too.
__________________
1999 Suburban 2500 4x4
2016 Jayflight 23RB Elite, Fiberglass, Polar Package
2011 F350 Lariat, DWR 4x4, 6.7 turbo diesel
2017 Open Range, Mesa Ridge 374BHS
Screwby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 06:33 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Columbus
Posts: 70
What do you do with batteries when connected to power all the time? Does the charger stop off after fully charging or do you need to disconnect them when on shore power for say months at a time?
Pappyt2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 07:01 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Calgary
Posts: 437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappyt2 View Post
What do you do with batteries when connected to power all the time? Does the charger stop off after fully charging or do you need to disconnect them when on shore power for say months at a time?
I don't know anything about full-timing, but couldn't you just flip the "converter" breaker and your batteries would sit just fine? Or disconnect them too, I guess.
GrumpyDad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2018, 07:15 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Screwby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Full Timer
Posts: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappyt2 View Post
What do you do with batteries when connected to power all the time? Does the charger stop off after fully charging or do you need to disconnect them when on shore power for say months at a time?
You leave the batteries hooked up. Unless you have a faulty converter it should just keep the batteries floated once they are 100% charged. There are better converters out there than the stock ones that are smarter and charge faster but your stock one will work fine. There are instances with malfunctioning converters dumping juice into batteries and “cooking them dry” but that’s few and far between. Also remember that batteries can freeze, but a charging battery shouldn’t. So if full timing and it’s cold, keep your batteries warm or plugged in or both.
When I’m not on the move my campers are plugged in 24-7. This way I know they are good to go and nothing has slowly drained the batteries dead. I also have a reminder set to check the water in my batteries every month (flooded batteries). If any of them look low I just add a bit, easy peasy preventative maintenance. Take care of your batteries, they are your campers lifeblood if fulltiming and there is no guarantee of shore power day to day.
__________________
1999 Suburban 2500 4x4
2016 Jayflight 23RB Elite, Fiberglass, Polar Package
2011 F350 Lariat, DWR 4x4, 6.7 turbo diesel
2017 Open Range, Mesa Ridge 374BHS
Screwby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2018, 07:39 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Full Timer In Naples
Posts: 170
We have full timed for 5 years so far and love it. It does have its draw backs as no garage for me and the DW has to find that space to make it fit, but when we sold the stick and brick, we down sized to a 30 foot cargo trailer, so that became the garage. And we just down sized again as my DW found out she dosent need all the nick nacks and we find that having less is more. So the cargo trailer has my tools and a work bench with a vise, her christmas stuff and such and the extra things that you can live with not having in the rv. We recommend Rv living highly as how to much space do you really need to live. We have a 40' 5ver with 2 lazy boys and the usual furniture, 40" TV, Washer dryer (Recommended), a big bath with a king bed, and much cheaper to live than the house and thats it. If you have any questions please ask and we will try at answer if we can. And the battery we just stay hooked up 24/7 and after 5 years had to change it out just a few months ago.
eagleback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2018, 09:18 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: La Crosse
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smurf View Post
Would like to here from some Full timers. Wife and I are aggressively considering it. Would like to here some pros and cons, things to consider, realistic 5th wheel size and any additional valuable input.

Thanks
Well, if you want some hints and tips from someone who JUST started the full time journey, feel free to ask me any questions. We just closed on the house last Friday and are officially full timing now so the process to get there is very fresh in our heads.

One thing I would suggest is talking to someone who recently went through the change and to someone who has been doing it for a while. The one who is recent will be able to share hints and tips to get out of your house and the one who has been doing it for a while will offer tips and hints on things that they have learned over the years to keep them on the road. We talked to both and learned a LOT of info that has helped us on the transition so far.

As for Pros and Cons it really varies from person to person and it all depends on what you value in a house vs a trailer. Some really miss the garage (see a few posts up) while others really miss other things. For me the biggest con is that I will not be able to be around my family for the winter holidays (Wisconsin winters are not too friendly to campers). That being said, we could hop on a chat and after getting to know you a little more it would be easier to offer some input.

Same for the 5er size. It really depends on what you are looking for. Again after talking for a bit I could definitely offer some suggestions as there would be some questions I would have to ask first as to what features you are looking for, what kind of campgrounds you would look to get into, what can your Tow vehicle handle (or would you upgrade your TV), etc.

If you are interested, feel free to send me a PM and we can discuss further.
WeRVoyagers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2018, 03:07 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Las Cruces
Posts: 1,148
Sorry for the long post.

Well, we are about to go from FT to a stick house again. Whether or not you enjoy it depends a lot on why you are doing it and what you expect it to be like. Are you recently retired? Kids recently moved away. Any 'extra' major life changes will complicate the situation.

Our 'adventure' was mostly to see where in the country we wanted to live and that was accomplished after a 18 months. We thought it would take a lot longer but having the fifth wheel made the decision easier as we could live in the prospective areas for a while to see what they were really like.

Before you go, have you ever lived in very close quarters with your wife for long periods of time? It will aggravate any 'discrepancies' that you two have with each other. It is more difficult to have separate quiet time/lives. What do you do in your free time and will the trailer support it. We selected a bunkhouse model so we could still pursue our hobbies. It was still not that easy since only one of us could be in there at a time. The floorplan is probably the MOST important part of choosing an RV. If it is not right you will come to resent the small things. We went through that with a prior RV.

You will also find out a lot about yourself and each other and you will pobably change a bit as you go along. Be prepared for some very emotional times.

Cost. It is not as inexpensive as you might think depending on where you choose to park. Daily rates, especially near popular locations, will be in the $50/day range, and can be higher. Monthly rates are quite a bit less, but, some RV parks have limited monthly rate spots. Our son lives in Seattle area. Only three RV sites nearby. One has no monthly sites and the other two are full (full time residents). Cost for us to stay in that area is about $1500/month. Don't get me wrong, if you are careful you can get by for a lot less if you are willing to stay in the less expensive parks. And, if you boondock stays are 'free'. If you do plan to boondock I highly recommend a genset installed in the RV, sized to run at least two AC units.

Pros: You can travel whenever you want and stay in any area you want as long as you want. You can 'live' in many places where you probably could not afford to live in an apt or stick house. For someone who likes to see the sights it is an ideal lifestyle.

Cons: A lot depends on your hobbies and interests. Some hobbies are incompatible or difficult with a mobile lifestyle.
One hazard is internet service. If you require very high speed then it will be costly or even impossible. Regular surfing and such is doable with just a cell phone connection. Large documents or streaming of video is limited.
If you need good TV service then budget in a good satellite ant and service.
Flooplan. Choose one that suits your interests.
Travel. The larger the RV, the more difficult it is to travel. When we started we thought, 'we can finally stop at all those small towns we used to pass.' Well, that didn't quite happen. Most of those small towns had not parking area big enough for our rig and no campground or RV park to stay in. So drive down the road and not find anyplace for over an hour. Yes, you can stay somewhere and then drive around to sightsee. Our life was complicated by our dog so that created another issue to deal with when going out for the day.
We also thought we might do some old fashioned camping. The length of the rig made that very difficlt. Not very many places where we could drag a 35ft 11,000lb trailer. The old saying is, the bigger the rig, the less 'camping' you do. For us 35ft meant no more 'camping' (I define camping as not being in a full hookup site).
Planning. Larger rigs do not fit in many gas stations. If you have a diesel rig then plan on using truck stop pumps (or the Flying J RV islands). We also thought that most rural areas would have diesel pumps. Not always true. We found that many rural areas in the SE would not have very many diesel pumps that we could put the rig into. Then there are the roads themselves. Longer rigs mean being a bit careful about where you go. There are many 'traps' where you cannot turn around. At first I found the plannning a challenge and part of the life. Now I find it a PITA and it affected my enjoyment of the trip.

Last. Vacation. Basically this is a positive and negative. When you go you have all your own stuff with you and your own bed. On the neg side, even on vacation you are still at 'home'. Can't explain it much better. We solved the problem by going to hotels every now and then for a getaway. It meant finding a kennel for the dog, but, at least we felt like we were on vacation. Adds a lot to the cost of the lifestyle.
__________________
2017 Eagle HT 29.5BHOK (sold)
2017 Ford Powerstroke 6.7, Crew, 4x4 (sold)
2018 Toyota Highlander
Maggie, Old English Sheepdog
vcbice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2018, 07:13 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Las Cruces
Posts: 1,148
Forgot one. A base camp. The location for this one was deemed not important to us at first. We became Escapees and had out permanent residency in Livingston, TX. Very easy to set up and that group is wonderful. Mail service is excellent.

After about 6 months it became more of an issue, mentally. Where are you from? is one of the common questions you get to figure out. You are no longer 'from' anywhere. Military families have an advantage in this area as they are used to that aspect.

What we found was that we needed a 'base'. Somewhere to go to when we were not 'traveling'. We found that place in southern NM, which was also where my wife's family was located. We changed residency to NM. Yes, they have state taxes, but, it suited us to do it this way.

That brings up 'stuff'. We got rid of anything that did not fit in the trailer. Yep a 2700sq ft house and shop full of tools, furniture, clothing, etc, etc. Took us about a year, most of that dealing with sentimental things. This is extremely emotional as well. We were prepared for this but it was still not easy.

If you have any doubts, then get a storage unit to keep stuff from the house that you may want again. Store it properly as there will probably be rodents in there. Stuffed furniture does not do well in storage.

Sorry for all this but going FT is not as simple as it may seem at first. Lots of stuff involved and most of it is mental, which can make things very difficult. Like laundry. Going to the laundramat may seem like a small thing but to us it was not. And, no, those washer/dryers made for RVs just do not do well. They take a long time to do a small amount of laundry.

Good luck with your decision.
__________________

__________________
2017 Eagle HT 29.5BHOK (sold)
2017 Ford Powerstroke 6.7, Crew, 4x4 (sold)
2018 Toyota Highlander
Maggie, Old English Sheepdog
vcbice is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Jayco, Inc. or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.