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Old 04-05-2014, 07:57 AM   #1
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Replacing batteries..

So, we learned last fall on the LT 26.5 RLS that it was a bad thing to run the battery all the way down. 5th is off site, in storage where I can't easily get to it currently. Stock Jayco supplied battery box in the front compartment. I'm not even sure what size battery is in the box. Whatever it is, it won't hold a charge. Now looking to upgrade. Costco is featuring their 6v Golf Cart batteries. Can anyone share the dimensions of the battery compartment, to determine whether the GC batteries might fit, and a suitable battery box I can use to put them in? Or, if you've done something else better for your 26.5 to boost the available battery amps, I'd love to hear about it!
Someday I'd love to add solar, but that someday is a ways off....
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Old 04-05-2014, 08:09 AM   #2
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Many of the PWM type chargers say that they can bring a battery back after heavy discharge.
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:05 AM   #3
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Recommend you to put a disconnect on your batteries. There is a pretty significant battery drain even when you think that you are not operational! They are not expensive and they will solve your problem.. Even golf cart batteries will drain down if left hooked up long enough. Most things in your camper are 12 volt powered and things like refrigerator electronics, smoke detectors & propane detectors are using some power all the time. A battery disconnect will eliminate that drain!!
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:08 AM   #4
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I wish - the current one is definitely a gonner. 'Tis a bad thing for one to leave a couple of lights on for several weeks in the driveway. Twice! It does have a disconnect, which I think my DW now understands needs to be turned on and OFF every time she does something in the camper when it is in the drive....
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:13 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flapper View Post
I wish - the current one is definitely a gonner. 'Tis a bad thing for one to leave a couple of lights on for several weeks in the driveway. Twice! It does have a disconnect, which I think my DW now understands needs to be turned on and OFF every time she does something in the camper when it is in the drive....
Most education comes with a price tag!!!
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Old 04-06-2014, 12:42 AM   #6
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If you choose to go to 2 GC2 6VDC batteries you may wish to keep in mind that the absorption charge voltage is 7.75 VDC per battery which equals 15.5 VDC. This is a much higher voltage than most RV converters can provide. This means that you will need to provide separate charging system from your RVs converter. I built a setup for my JayFlight 29BHS and had to add additional charging because I was constantly undercharging the batteries.
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Old 04-06-2014, 08:26 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by msturtz View Post
If you choose to go to 2 GC2 6VDC batteries you may wish to keep in mind that the absorption charge voltage is 7.75 VDC per battery which equals 15.5 VDC. This is a much higher voltage than most RV converters can provide. This means that you will need to provide separate charging system from your RVs converter. I built a setup for my JayFlight 29BHS and had to add additional charging because I was constantly undercharging the batteries.

What Michael wrote is very important . The best batteries in the world will only be as good as the charge method you use.
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Old 04-06-2014, 07:55 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by msturtz View Post
If you choose to go to 2 GC2 6VDC batteries you may wish to keep in mind that the absorption charge voltage is 7.75 VDC per battery which equals 15.5 VDC. This is a much higher voltage than most RV converters can provide. This means that you will need to provide separate charging system from your RVs converter.
If you have the 2 - 6VDC batteries in series to equal 12VDC for the TT, you do not use the 6VDC recommended battery specifications X2. You need to use the 12VDC specifications. If your TT is a late model will handle the requirements easily. The TT's battery charger's microcontroller determines the amount of amperage that the batteries need. You can Google your battery controller mfr to see what your controller specifications are.

Most battery TT controllers do not use the 15 – 15.5VDC Equalization mode, they use 14.6VDC “Boost mode”. The TT's battery controllers "Absorption" mode should be close to 13.6VDC, and “Float” mode around 13.2VDC.

With 15-15.5 volts comes a lot of battery heat, and the well designed (aftermarket) controller should have a temperature/voltage sensor connected to the batteries terminal (post), so the controller knows when to drop the voltage. If not monitored, there is a chance that the batteries may explode, if overcharged. TT battery controllers are not that sophisticated, hence only about 14.6VDC, to play it safe.

The PD4000 battery charge controller in our 2013 Eagle 284BHS, has the capability of putting out 45Amps at 13.6 volts (14.4 volts in burst mode), and I never had an issue of undercharging (2 - 6VDC Trojan T145 260Ah batteries in series). I have since added SOLAR and I have turned the TT's charge controller's 120VAC breaker off (wired to its own breaker). Normally the batteries only need about 1.5 amps when in Absorption mode each day.

The only time my voltage hits 15 - 15.5VDC is when I manually switch to "Equalization" mode on the solar charge controller. I only do this once every few months. One last thing, it is not a good idea to have your TT's electronics online when the voltage is in the 15VDC range. A lot of nasty things can happen to electronics in that range.

If you are encountering undercharging, there are a few areas to look at: The size of your batteries may not meet your DC power demands, the batteries may have been discharged to a voltage that is to low multiple times and can no longer maintain a charge. One of the batteries may have a bad cell. The age of the batteries (cycles). The TT's battery controller may not be operating properly. Another area to look at is the possibility that the cable connections may not be clean or the gauge of wire used may be to small.
Don
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Old 04-07-2014, 12:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustang65 View Post
If you have the 2 - 6VDC batteries in series to equal 12VDC for the TT, you do not use the 6VDC recommended battery specifications X2. You need to use the 12VDC specifications. If your TT is a late model will handle the requirements easily. The TT's battery charger's microcontroller determines the amount of amperage that the batteries need. You can Google your battery controller mfr to see what your controller specifications are.

Most battery TT controllers do not use the 15 – 15.5VDC Equalization mode, they use 14.6VDC “Boost mode”. The TT's battery controllers "Absorption" mode should be close to 13.6VDC, and “Float” mode around 13.2VDC.

With 15-15.5 volts comes a lot of battery heat, and the well designed (aftermarket) controller should have a temperature/voltage sensor connected to the batteries terminal (post), so the controller knows when to drop the voltage. If not monitored, there is a chance that the batteries may explode, if overcharged. TT battery controllers are not that sophisticated, hence only about 14.6VDC, to play it safe.

The PD4000 battery charge controller in our 2013 Eagle 284BHS, has the capability of putting out 45Amps at 13.6 volts (14.4 volts in burst mode), and I never had an issue of undercharging (2 - 6VDC Trojan T145 260Ah batteries in series). I have since added SOLAR and I have turned the TT's charge controller's 120VAC breaker off (wired to its own breaker). Normally the batteries only need about 1.5 amps when in Absorption mode each day.

The only time my voltage hits 15 - 15.5VDC is when I manually switch to "Equalization" mode on the solar charge controller. I only do this once every few months. One last thing, it is not a good idea to have your TT's electronics online when the voltage is in the 15VDC range. A lot of nasty things can happen to electronics in that range.

If you are encountering undercharging, there are a few areas to look at: The size of your batteries may not meet your DC power demands, the batteries may have been discharged to a voltage that is to low multiple times and can no longer maintain a charge. One of the batteries may have a bad cell. The age of the batteries (cycles). The TT's battery controller may not be operating properly. Another area to look at is the possibility that the cable connections may not be clean or the gauge of wire used may be to small.
Don
I had GC2 golf cart batteries in my JayFlight 29BHS installed by the dealer. I had major problems with undercharging. Even when I had a 3 stage Progressive Dynamics converter installed the batteries were constantly undercharged by the converter. To resolve this issue I had to install two separate 6VDC automatic chargers to each battery. The chargers were isolated from each other. Following the directions from the battery manufacturer as to charging voltage is important. There are specific instructions for paralleling situations. Do your research and ensure you are not under or overcharging your batteries. I chose the option of using separate isolated 6VDC automatic chargers to keep my GC2 batteries up because of the issues of the higher 12 VDC charging voltage. GC2 batteries are a great way to go if you understand the limitations. There are other issues with paralleling batteries including how you connect the charger(s) and load(s). http://www.batteries-faq.com/activek...p?questionid=1
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Old 04-11-2014, 11:17 AM   #10
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In 6 years with my solar system I have never seen voltages in the 15.5 area. mine charge to 100% at 14.6. IF you camp off grid (boondock) pairs of 6's is the way to go.. IF you always stay in RV parks with electrical hookups then dont waste your money on 6's
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