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Old 10-30-2015, 03:36 PM   #21
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The sticker in the door is the bible for the truck. 1138 is your payload as far as Ford is concerned. If you look online or if you have the sales brochure and look up the GVW of the truck you will see a higher payload number but once you option the vehicle out the final number will most likely be less.

What trim package is on the truck?

We have a SCREW in the XLT package and the sticker says payload of 1438 and I use that plus some. Our trailer is around 6500 loaded and when loaded I scale around 13200 Lbs (truck and trailer) and the trucks GCVW is 13500. The truck pulls our trailer but it is always working hard to do it and the towing experience is less than relaxing. If you are not going to be traveling far then I believe you can make it work but any long trips will be a lot of stress and strain on you and your truck.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:01 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Ottawasteve View Post
While you are correct that payload is your limiting factoR, ...

.... Your truck DOES NOT have 1138 lbs of total payload.
Such a good and informed sentence followed by such an incorrect sentence is almost unbelievable.

The OP provided a picture of the factory affixed sticker that very clearly states "all passengers" and "cargo" are NOT to exceed 1138#. The means 1138# is exactly how much payload is available. Which you accurately pointed out is a limiting factor.

Nothing wrong with hitting the scale, but Ford already provided the information.
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Old 10-30-2015, 08:43 PM   #23
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Too much trailer for your truck. Weights all considered. Another thing people tend to shy away from and/or not consider is trailer lengths. Even when the weights are within tolerances, the lengths (wheel base ratios, tongue to axle length, etc.) can be too long.

In just this past two years I have been privy to three accidents all relating to "to much trailer for the truck". Two of them happen to be involving F150s. My neighbor was one of them. He was approximately 800lbs below his max weight, but the length of the trailer played a factor and the effect was the tail wagged the dog right off the road and totaled both (witness of the accident right behind him was driving a 3500, with trailer one foot longer and had no problem). The second was my best friend and though I did not witness it, according to what he told me, it was the same phenomena, his was a Chevy 1500HD, and his 28 foot TT and his WDH were the only thing totaled. The trailer whipped itself and twisted flipping on its side and twisted the bars on the WDH before coming unhitched. The third was an F150 and it was just plain overloaded with to much weight and a majority loaded to the back of the trailer.

Don't get me wrong, I really like the F150's they are a great truck and that eco boost is a winning combination but it seems to me a lot of the F150 eco boost owners tend to put to much on their trucks (just seems an observation to me), same goes for Tahoe owners. Just because the factory rated it to haul/tow up to a specific hefty weight limit, doesn't mean it should.
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Old 10-31-2015, 12:24 PM   #24
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Other models to consider: look at the Jay Feather 25BH, or the Whitehawk 24MBH or 25BHS.
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Old 10-31-2015, 02:52 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clubhouse View Post
Such a good and informed sentence followed by such an incorrect sentence is almost unbelievable.

The OP provided a picture of the factory affixed sticker that very clearly states "all passengers" and "cargo" are NOT to exceed 1138#. The means 1138# is exactly how much payload is available. Which you accurately pointed out is a limiting factor.
They say ignorance is bliss, so stay happy you have plenty of company, but I would not want others on the forum to be mislead by your inaccurate statement. Here is the link for the 2014 Ford Tow Guide so others can verify for themselves:

https://www.ford.ca/resources/ford/general/pdf/towingguides/35520_2014_rv_trailer_and_towing_guide_english.pdf

Where it states:
Cargo Weight Rating shown in chart is maximum allowable, assuming weight of a base vehicle with required camper option content and a 150-lb. passenger at each available seating position.

The payload sticker reflects a 150 lb passenger in each available seat, which is 5 in the truck of the OP. If a 200 lb passenger is in each seat, you would have to deduct 5 X 50 lbs or 250lbs from the payload on the sticker. As the OP said there are 2 adults and one child in the truck he will have a few more pounds of payload to work with than what is stated on the sticker.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NVGun40 View Post
Too much trailer for your truck. Weights all considered. Another thing people tend to shy away from and/or not consider is trailer lengths. Even when the weights are within tolerances, the lengths (wheel base ratios, tongue to axle length, etc.) can be too long.
In just this past two years I have been privy to three accidents all relating to "to much trailer for the truck". Two of them happen to be involving F150s. My neighbor was one of them. He was approximately 800lbs below his max weight, but the length of the trailer played a factor and the effect was the tail wagged the dog right off the road and totaled both (witness of the accident right behind him was driving a 3500, with trailer one foot longer and had no problem). The second was my best friend and though I did not witness it, according to what he told me, it was the same phenomena, his was a Chevy 1500HD, and his 28 foot TT and his WDH were the only thing totaled. The trailer whipped itself and twisted flipping on its side and twisted the bars on the WDH before coming unhitched. The third was an F150 and it was just plain overloaded with to much weight and a majority loaded to the back of the trailer.
NV Gun has been spouting this BS for years, without any details on the setups involved. These posts are easily located with a forum search and I am not going to repeat all of them here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1wayhighway View Post
The sticker in the door is the bible for the truck. 1138 is your payload as far as Ford is concerned. If you look online or if you have the sales brochure and look up the GVW of the truck you will see a higher payload number but once you option the vehicle out the final number will most likely be less.

What trim package is on the truck?

We have a SCREW in the XLT package and the sticker says payload of 1438 and I use that plus some. Our trailer is around 6500 loaded and when loaded I scale around 13200 Lbs (truck and trailer) and the trucks GCVW is 13500. The truck pulls our trailer but it is always working hard to do it and the towing experience is less than relaxing. If you are not going to be traveling far then I believe you can make it work but any long trips will be a lot of stress and strain on you and your truck.
One highway, if you think your tow package is the same as the Maxtow package, you need to do a little more research. The Max Tow package includes some important physical differences which increase the F150's tow ratings and payload ratings by about 20% on identically equipped trucks. This results in a truck that has a harsher ride unloaded but is also more stable when pulling. More likely than not, the OP has an XL or XLT SCrew (Lariat and Platinum owners always include it in their sigs) so with the Maxtow the OP's actual payload will be at least 200 lbs more than your tow package XLT. The Tow package has no physical differences other than the hitch and brake controller. The difference in the 2013 F150 the payload sticker was based on a single 150lb driver whereas the 2014 is based on a 150lb person in each available seating position. You can check with Ford on this if you would like. Please point out any other physical differences between the 2013 and 2014 F150's or let me know if you find any reliable information to this effect. Is the GVWR on your truck 300 lbs more than the OP ?

Not going to beat this dead horse any further. The stock F150 does not have the same capability/capacity of a F250/2500. A stock F150/half ton does not have the same towing capacity/capability as a F150 with Max Tow and/or HD Payload Package which is what the OP is asking about. The OP will have to decide whether the capacities of his F150 with Max Tow package are sufficient with how he will be loading it. If he is putting a golf cart in the back of his truck, then yes he will be over capacity. If he is aware of his weight capacities, then there is no reason he would not be able to load within limits and tow legally and safely. The general statements about half-tons vs. 3/4 tons are misleading and demonstrate a lack of knowledge which has the potential to mislead people who come to the forum for some accurate input into their decision making process.
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Old 10-31-2015, 03:27 PM   #26
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I have this trailer and had the f150 ecoboost.

With the trailer loaded It is about 7,500lbs, and the truck fueled with passengers and wdh, I was over my gvwr, and rear axle rating.

Traveling like this was okay- most of the time. Highway driving was not comfortable. Sway wasn't bad. I would get pushed/pulled by every semi, evens trucks/suv passing me on the highway. My tongue weight measured by surline scale ranged from 900-1100lbs depending on how I loaded.

My payload was about 1400lb on the door sticker. I did not have the factory bed liner which does take up more cargo.

I was ready to install air bags and LT tires in hopes to improve towing. Traded the truck before that happened.

My wife's mini van has over 1,300 lbs of cargo. It seems crazy that these trucks are about the same (crew cab, 4wd, + options). I think our engines will pull more than the truck can handle.
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Old 11-01-2015, 07:55 AM   #27
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The clean underwear test. Haha. While this can be a quality test, I would not put all faith in it.

For example. We have this trailer and currently tow it with a 2015 Yukon. While I have not run the numbers, I am pretty much absolutely positive we are overloading the rig. We have only went on a few camping trips so far with the setup... probably 700-800 miles total. The rig has so far been flawless. Absolutely no sway ever (been in very windy conditions, passed semi's, yada yada). Stops wonderfully. Even has enough motor to get up and go fairly quickly. I have literally passed vehicles in the passing lanes and looked down a few miles down the road to see I have crept up to a steady 70mph without realizing it. The clean underwear test for this setup pretty much shows we have a good setup going. But in all reality, we are way overloaded.

My point is, just because your clean underwear test is an A+ doesn't mean you have a good setup.

And the same goes with just "running the numbers". When your 1-ton truck is swaying all over with your popup, yet your "numbers" are all good, doesn't mean you have a good setup.

IMO, being within spec for the towing and payload ratings is important. As I have proved to myself, it is possible to be overloaded and still feel like you can tow very safely. But, I don't like the idea at all. And because of this we are going to get a different tow rig... because we are not getting rid of the 28BHBE!

I have a feeling your truck would handle it as well (or most likley better) than my wifes Yukon. But, I still recommend jumping up to a 3/4 ton rig. This is a big trailer for a half ton, PERIOD.

Best of luck with your decision.
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Old 11-01-2015, 10:07 AM   #28
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I do not understand all of the math involved but, we have a 2016 28BHBE and our tow vehicle is a 2015 Tundra with the tow package. It is rated at 11000 lbs and seems to do very well at pulling our TT when it is loaded. We have not made any big trips or had to make any fairly steep climbs, as of right now, so when we do my feelings may change.
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Old 11-01-2015, 11:27 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawasteve View Post
They say ignorance is bliss, so stay happy you have plenty of company, but I would not want others on the forum to be mislead by your inaccurate statement. Here is the link for the 2014 Ford Tow Guide so others can verify for themselves:

https://www.ford.ca/resources/ford/general/pdf/towingguides/35520_2014_rv_trailer_and_towing_guide_english.pdf

Where it states:
Cargo Weight Rating shown in chart is maximum allowable, assuming weight of a base vehicle with required camper option content and a 150-lb. passenger at each available seating position.

The payload sticker reflects a 150 lb passenger in each available seat, which is 5 in the truck of the OP. If a 200 lb passenger is in each seat, you would have to deduct 5 X 50 lbs or 250lbs from the payload on the sticker. As the OP said there are 2 adults and one child in the truck he will have a few more pounds of payload to work with than what is stated on the sticker.




NV Gun has been spouting this BS for years, without any details on the setups involved. These posts are easily located with a forum search and I am not going to repeat all of them here.



One highway, if you think your tow package is the same as the Maxtow package, you need to do a little more research. The Max Tow package includes some important physical differences which increase the F150's tow ratings and payload ratings by about 20% on identically equipped trucks. This results in a truck that has a harsher ride unloaded but is also more stable when pulling. More likely than not, the OP has an XL or XLT SCrew (Lariat and Platinum owners always include it in their sigs) so with the Maxtow the OP's actual payload will be at least 200 lbs more than your tow package XLT. The Tow package has no physical differences other than the hitch and brake controller. The difference in the 2013 F150 the payload sticker was based on a single 150lb driver whereas the 2014 is based on a 150lb person in each available seating position. You can check with Ford on this if you would like. Please point out any other physical differences between the 2013 and 2014 F150's or let me know if you find any reliable information to this effect. Is the GVWR on your truck 300 lbs more than the OP ?

Not going to beat this dead horse any further. The stock F150 does not have the same capability/capacity of a F250/2500. A stock F150/half ton does not have the same towing capacity/capability as a F150 with Max Tow and/or HD Payload Package which is what the OP is asking about. The OP will have to decide whether the capacities of his F150 with Max Tow package are sufficient with how he will be loading it. If he is putting a golf cart in the back of his truck, then yes he will be over capacity. If he is aware of his weight capacities, then there is no reason he would not be able to load within limits and tow legally and safely. The general statements about half-tons vs. 3/4 tons are misleading and demonstrate a lack of knowledge which has the potential to mislead people who come to the forum for some accurate input into their decision making process.
One of us is wrong, both feel its each other so yes ignorance is bliss.

I looked at the document you linked too, then I also reviewed the 2015 version, and it clearly discusses the "cargo rating" showed in the published charts. That is entirely different than the yellow payload sticker the factory affixes to the driver door B Pillar. The yellow sticker is specific to the vehicle where the chart is generic to the family or class of truck. Think of it in terms of when Jayco publishes weights and capacities for a specific model, then when you see that trailer in real life the actual weights and capacities don't match up.

Further you are quoting the section related to truck campers, not towed trailers.

I don't think I am the one spreading misleading information on this topic.

OP should have enough opinions to make a decision now. Maybe he will be kind enough to hit the scales, share his weights and see which one of us is right and right and who is "blissful"
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Old 11-01-2015, 11:55 AM   #30
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I don't think I am the one spreading misleading information on this topic.

OP should have enough opinions to make a decision now. Maybe he will be kind enough to hit the scales, share his weights and see which one of us is right and right and who is "blissful"
I am with you. The payload picture clearly states the following;

THE COMBINED WEIGHT OF OCCUPANTS AND CARGO SHOULD NEVER EXCEED 1138 LBS.

It doesn't say that the combined weight of should never exceed 1138 lbs, plus 150 lbs per 5 passengers for a total of 1888 lbs... it clearly states COMBINED WEIGHT SHOULD NOT EXCEED 1138 LBS.

That isn't gray area, that isn't confusing, that isn't open for interpretation.
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