Jayco RV Owners Forum
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-07-2015, 08:13 AM   #31
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Missouri City, The Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,011
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioRVMom View Post
I thought we had to go lower on the tongue weight to preserve payload? then again how much weight does the weight distribution hitch throw off the hitch? a possible alternative for us would be the 287BHSW. It's about 500 lbs lighter at around 6030 and a hitch on paper of 645. I'd really prefer to stay with Jayco, but this would be our last ditch attempt to stay out of canvas. it's bare bones and has a fraction of the amenities i was hoping for, but it would work.
Yes, the tongue weight will consume some of the payload. However the tongue needs to be around 15% of the total trailer weight. So if the TT weighs 7000# the tongue should be around 1000#. It doesn't have to be "exactly" 15% but too much or too little and the TT will not tow safely.
__________________

__________________
Cheers,
T_

2013 F-350 CC SB 2WD 6.7PS
2013 Eagle Premier 351 RLTS
-SOLD- 2012 X23B
-SOLD- 2003 Ford Expedition 5.4, Bilstein shocks
RedHorse1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 08:24 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
jsallman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Ames
Posts: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioRVMom View Post
I thought we had to go lower on the tongue weight to preserve payload? then again how much weight does the weight distribution hitch throw off the hitch? a possible alternative for us would be the 287BHSW. It's about 500 lbs lighter at around 6030 and a hitch on paper of 645. I'd really prefer to stay with Jayco, but this would be our last ditch attempt to stay out of canvas. it's bare bones and has a fraction of the amenities i was hoping for, but it would work.
Your weight distribution hitch wont remove payload from the truck, nor do I believe it will affect tounge weight, some of the weight is simply no longer "down"force. It should shift weight from the rear axel to the front axels so it might help with the individual GAWR numbers is all.

More weight in the front does help the ride, I can attest to that. The tow home from the dealer was much worse than when we put some cargo in the front. I think the rear of the trailer doesn't bounce as much with front weight, and you ill feel every bounce in the truck.

Pull open your manual on your TV as well, you may have some concerns with front surface area of the trailer as well, if your over that you probably don't want to be at maximum numbers on the weight and tongue.
__________________

__________________
2016 Jayflight 29BHDS
2015 Ram 2500 Laramie Crew Cab - 6.4 Hemi
2013 Ford F150 Supercrew EcoBoost, MaxTow (Loved and Sold)

Equal-i-zer Weight distribution system
jsallman1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 09:39 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: CANADA
Posts: 368
Whatever trailer you end up with, consider the Andersen hitch. It's what we use and it weighs under 60 pounds compared to about 100 for standard WDH.

And other have answered your tongue weight questions already. But to reiterate, the tongue weight must be between 10 and 15%. Closer to 15 typically gives a better towing experience. And calculate 15% of the trailer weight when you're looking as you can't guarantee you can keep it as low as 10%. For example, there is no way I can get my trailer tongue at 10%, its just not happening. I have nothing's can redistribute to the rear of the trailer to lighten the tongue any.

I'd suggest you look at the trailer we have, the X213 (2 bunks and a hard rear slide), but since you likely have less allowable rear axle weight than I do, I'm not sure it would work for you. Possibly. You really would need to know your RAWR first (on the same sticker that has your truck payload). Remember too, if you're carrying kids, they grow and get heavier so if you're at your limits now, you'd be over your limits soon.
__________________
2015 Jayco X213
2014 Ford F-150 Platinum EcoBoost w/ MaxTow
SilverEscape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 09:43 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Ottawasteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 293
Hi Ohio, I am currently pulling an Eagle 28BHBE with a 2010 F150 as you may have read in other posts. Love the floorplan of the 28 BHBE and understand why it would be desirable for your needs. My delivered Jayco was 500 lbs more dry than the posted weights as others have mentioned.


Without the Maxtow and preferably a Heavy Duty Payload package on an F150, it will not be an enjoyable tow and towing over capacity will result in expenses that will likely not be covered under your extended warranty. I was towing a 4000lb trailer for 3 years and the Jayco for the last 2 and at my 100,000 kms service (65,000 miles) earlier this month,even though I am towing under capacity, my truck still required 2 rear shocks and 2 front struts which were fortunately covered under extended warranty.


The Max Tow and HD Payload add 15 to 20 % to towing and payload capacities (11,200 tow and 1800 lbs payload in 2010 Supercrew F150 with Maxtow) and result in a much harsher ride when unloaded due to heavier suspension components and they also suffer slightly in mpg due to lower geared rear ends.




You may wish to look at the possibility of trading your 2013 on a 2014 F150 with Max Tow and Heavy Duty Payload package as often you can transfer the extended warranty to the new vehicle. While you might incur some additional costs up front, you may save some repair costs (suspension etc.) over the life of your vehicle and have a much better towing experience over the next 10 years.
__________________
2015 Eagle 284BHBE

2010 Ford F150 XLT 5.4 Maxtow, Coverking Seat Covers, Putco LED interiors, Kenwood DNX571TR GPS, Kicker Powerstage, Weathertech Floor Mats and Window Vents, Line-X, Firestone Airbags, Michelin LTX-MS2, LivewireTS 5 Star tuned, Propride 3P
Ottawasteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 09:52 AM   #35
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Massillon
Posts: 60
i appreciate all the replies and help, I truly do. But, if I said it all made 100% sense to me I'd be lying Technically I'm allowed a dry hitch weight of 770 to 1155. But with everything I am reading about keeping my trailer - I am guessing - about 2,000 lbs below max tow rating of 7700 lbs, and the dry hitch weights typically being 550 to 800 lbs, I'm "assuming" that my hitch weight needs to be 500 give or take (based on cutting 2,000 lbs off the max trailer weight).. 500 doesn't leave much in options. most of what i am seeing that are desirable are 650 to 800 on paper.

now payload - I was also told that the dry hitch has to be added to the pay load as does the WDH, which means 800 give or take when our payload is only 1582 meaning we can only have about 750 ish lbs in the truck and probably less. people dog and a cooler are likely going to wipe out at least 750. which means we can't put a feather in the bed. or we take 2 vehicles. I got really frustrated when I was reading the lower weight trailers (5000 lb or so) could still have a 700+ lb dry hitch.

I am really sorry but my head is still swimming. And I hate our truck right now. LOL. seriously. I'm only half joking on top of it all, everyone is saying the hitch weight on paper is far underestimated so how in the *####* can one make a educated decision without towing a tent attached to a rubber band attached to the tail of the truck. That should be light enough.
OhioRVMom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 09:56 AM   #36
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Massillon
Posts: 60
>>>only slightly frustrated<<<
OhioRVMom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 10:03 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: CANADA
Posts: 368
Also, according to the 2013 Ford towing guide, your max tongue weight is 1130 pounds if using a WDH. https://www.fleet.ford.ca/resources/...Tgde_Oct19.pdf That link is from a Canadian site but it's not a Canada specific tow guide.

I'd check your receiver on the truck just in case too. If it has a lower sticker tongue weight than the towing guide, then you need to go by it.
__________________
2015 Jayco X213
2014 Ford F-150 Platinum EcoBoost w/ MaxTow
SilverEscape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 10:16 AM   #38
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: CANADA
Posts: 368
I understand your frustration as well. We bought our trailer figuring we'd be able to tow it with our SUV with a 500 tongue weight max. Figured if we kept the trailer at 5000#, we'd keep the tongue at 10% and if the dry hitch weight was 365#, that should be no problem, right? Wrong.

After we bought it, we found out that even when we remove the propane, battery and spare tire, that the tongue is still over 500#. The dry hitch weight is a useless number to go by. It is a number that is the dry hitch weight of a trailer with NO options (I swear it's even without the mandatory customer value package!), no propane, no spare tire, no battery, no power tongue jack. If you have any options added onto that trailer, it is bringing up the dry hitch weight, then add all the things you actually need on the tongue, and it's much heavier. Sometimes you can juggle the interior load to lighten the tongue a bit, but again, you can't get it too light. And in my trailer, I just don't have anything heavy enough to move to the back to make a difference.

I got lucky in some ways, in that in my unluckiness of having to sell our SUV and buy a truck, a couple days before we bought our F-150, I had remembered reading about payload. So I started looking at stickers and realized that in the Platinum model I wanted, they were around 1000-1100 pounds of payload and I knew that wasn't going to fly. I discovered the Max Tow package, and frantically searched for a Platinum with that package and we ended up having to drive 5 hours to go get it as they couldn't get me one locally. Coincidentally buying it in the same city we had bought our trailer in a month before. LOL

Oh, and our local Ford sales guy told me I was crazy, that I did not need the Max Tow package and that the Max Tow package did not increase payload (wrong!). He said that ours could tow 9600# I think it was, without the package, and I was fine. He also said that the tongue weight didn't count against payload (wrong!) and he'd never actually seen a yellow sticker before...so shows you how much he knew and how much he didn't care if we were safe. And he's been selling these trucks for close to 20 years.
__________________
2015 Jayco X213
2014 Ford F-150 Platinum EcoBoost w/ MaxTow
SilverEscape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 10:49 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Texas
Posts: 4,190
I know your frustrations, I've been there; you probably read about it in the other discussion. You can see in my post count that I'm an active member, and MANY of those posts are related to discussions just like this (I've been on BOTH sides). And those don't even count the hours of research I have done, and personal discussions I've had with people face-to-face who I would consider professional experts in the subject.

Here's a simple way to get a concrete answer: Take your whole family in the truck as if you were ready to go except for the trailer to a CAT (or other) scale and weigh it. Take the GVWR from your truck's door jamb and subtract the scale weight. That's your available payload. Period.

Take that available payload and subtract 100# for the Weight Distribution Hitch you will need (a little heavy maybe, but a good round estimate). Now take that figure and divide by .13. Example: if your available payload calculated above is 500 lbs, then take 500 divided by .13 (13% tongue weight). This will give you 3846; that is the weight your trailer can be without exceeding the GVWR of the truck assuming a 13% tongue weight (which is the minimum I would use if I were you).

You could also take a look at your rear axle rating ("GAWR RR" on your door placard) and use that number as an absolute maximum.

As I said, I know you're frustrated, but listen to what's being said in these discussions. Most of these people have been doing this a while, and many of us have been in your shoes (after purchase in my case).

I know where your husband is coming from too (I was there and fought like mad to stay there; I LOVED my GMC, it was my first new truck). But there is a significant difference between putting pen to paper and putting rubber to the road. Just because the paper calculations (based on assumptions that may or may not be accurate) work out, doesn't mean it should be done or can be done comfortably.

BTW, I'm the user you're talking about; 1-2 trips a month, 200-600 miles round-trip, no mountains, some hills, one major trip a year (yet to go on one of those, but have one planned for the fall).
__________________


2014 Jay Flight 28 BHBE
2015 RAM 2500 6.4L HEMI, Tradesman 4x4, 3.73
Blue Ox SwayPro (BXW 1503)

Upgraded from an REI internal frame backpack and a Eureka 1/2 dome tent!
Camper_bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 02:01 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: MD
Posts: 3,092
A little frustration now is better than frustration after you have a truck and a camper and realize they're not a good match... But I do feel for you. It takes some research. So hang in there.
__________________

__________________
2017 JayFlight 28BHBE
2014 JayFlight Swift 264BH (Sold)
2007 GMC 2500 Sierra Classic Crew Cab LBZ Duramax / 6spd Allison
SouthCo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia State Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2002-2016 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.