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Old 07-24-2013, 12:43 AM   #1
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Question Can I increase the tire size on my Jayfeather Sport 165?

Hello,

I have a 2011 Jayfeather Sport 165, that has 13" wheels, both of which have already worn out without much use. The wheels seem unusually small for a rig this size, and I'm wondering if I can purchase 14" or 15" wheels for this rig? There seems to be ample room for at least a 14" wheel--which of course I would test before using--but am wondering if I did increase the wheel size what the implications of this would be on other factors, such as tongue weight. I realize it would increase the overall height of the trailer, which is fine given that I sometimes take it on some rough forest service roads and can adjust the height of my trailer hitch on my vehicle easily.

So, if anyone has any experience or thoughts on this, I would be grateful for hearing from you.

Thank you,

Richard in Bozeman, Montana.
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Old 07-24-2013, 06:47 AM   #2
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I looked into this when I was shopping for new (and possibly larger) tires. Look up into the wheelwell above the tires. These isnt much room there for a larger tire/14" wheel when you think of the suspension travel etc. If you get the Dexter lift kit for the torsion axel you should be OK with a 14" setup. Heres the thread..

https://www.jaycoowners.com/showthrea...orflex-10-axle
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Old 07-25-2013, 06:01 PM   #3
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Hello,

Thank you for the reply: I was hoping that the 14" wheels would work without any lifters, but if these are required, this is good to know!

Richard
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Old 07-25-2013, 09:16 PM   #4
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No Prob. These particullar models are designed to ride low so cars/mini-vans are able to tow them.
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Old 07-28-2013, 11:13 PM   #5
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Can I increase the tire size on my Jayfeather Sport 165? Yes!

Increasing the size of the wheels has no effect on tongue weight. With that noted, I bought a 2010 Jay Feather Sport 165 in May and the first thing I did was to buy 14 inch wheels and tires for it. I didn't like being right at the limit of weight carrying capacity for the 13-inch wheel/tire combo and I also don't like the very limited selection of 13-inch tires. The old tires were 185mm bias ply. I bought three 14-inch wheels and Carlisle Radial Trail RH tires in size 215/75R14. So far I've been to Custer State Park, Badlands NP, and Rocky Mountain NP (roughly 1000 miles) and I have had no issues. The only thing that's different is that it's a little more difficult to fit the 14-inch wheel/tire assembly because it is larger and the clearance is a little tighter. For me, a lift kit would present more liabilities (expense, effort, higher vehicle profile, increased wind resistance) than benefits (marginally easier to remove and install the wheel/tire assembly).
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Old 07-29-2013, 08:15 AM   #6
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When you say worn out, what do you mean? The tread on the tires? Also, I'm curious to know what problem you are trying to solve?

Just a couple of things to keep in mind, you cannot increase the load capacity of the trailer by putting bigger wheels on. You are still limited by the axle capacity. Also its a myth that larger wheels are going to last longer or somehow be better. We had a Jayco Kiwi 17A, single axle, 13in wheels. Over 10 years, we put many thousands of miles on those wheels and tires. We towed it on one cross country trip to California and back, and out to Yellowstone from WI. Never blew a single tire, never had any trouble.

What I'm saying is that you probably won't gain much if anything by going to a 14 in wheel.
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Old 07-29-2013, 10:58 AM   #7
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Can I increase the tire size on my Jayfeather Sport 165?

These axles (Dexter #10) are available in 4 ride heights. Mine is a zero degree model. That means the pivot arm is supposed to be parallel to the ground at full load.

I'm looking into how much a 22 or 45 degree axle would lift it. A full axle with brakes is about $350, but I'm looking for one that's bare. Should be $150 or less.

I have the 14" upgrade and do like not being right at the limit of the tire.
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocBrown View Post
What I'm saying is that you probably won't gain much if anything by going to a 14 in wheel.
Unlike DocBrown, I had two blowouts and one tread separation in three years of owning my old trailer, so perhaps I am over-sensitive to the subject. My old trailer was a single-axle unit with 13-inch wheels and it only weighed 2150 pounds empty.

Tire failure is an expensive, time-wasting nuisance and it can be extremely dangerous. Changing a tire on the side of a busy road is intimidating. Replacing a tire can be expensive if you are in the middle of nowhere, not to mention the damage a blowout can do to your trailer.

For those of you who are not familiar with the 2010 Jay Feather Sport 165, the GVWR is 3500 pounds, but it weighs 2910 pounds empty and 2982 pounds with propane. A full tank of fresh water chews up another 249 pounds. That leaves a measly 269 pounds for cargo. My original sidewalls showed the tires were rated to carry 1660 pounds at 65 PSI (total 3320 pounds). Stamped into each wheel was the same 1660 pound rating. Keep in mind that the GVWR is 3500 pounds, but the GAWR (as indicated on the sticker on the trailer) is only 3300 pounds. I assume it's because part of the weight is on the tongue, but how much is really on the tongue? My weight distributing hitch is designed to take weight off the rear axle of the TV and distribute it to the TV's front axle AND the trailer's axle. In short, even with a minimal amount of cargo, I am essentially at the limit of my trailer's axle rating, as well as the ratings of my wheels and tires. I am not comfortable running my components near 100% of their rated capacity and I don't know why anyone would be. So, what did I gain with my swap? Some peace of mind. I am no longer running on the bleeding edge. My new wheels are rated at 2040 pounds each. My new tires are rated to carry 1870 pounds each - and I get to run 'em at 50 PSI, not 65. Because they are larger, my new tires rotate 10% slower. That can't be bad for the tires or the wheel bearings. They also have a larger contact patch. Finally, D-rated 13-inch tires are not easy to find, especially if you are out on the road. By comparison, C-rated 14s are ubiquitous.
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Old 07-31-2013, 07:43 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by David Jay View Post
Finally, D-rated 13-inch tires are not easy to find, especially if you are out on the road. By comparison, C-rated 14s are ubiquitous.
AMEN! Went to 6 tire shops looking for them and all I got was a chuckle and a "nope". Even CW dosent have them. Ended up ordering from E-Trailer online. Very happy so far.
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Jay View Post
Unlike DocBrown, I had two blowouts and one tread separation in three years of owning my old trailer, so perhaps I am over-sensitive to the subject. My old trailer was a single-axle unit with 13-inch wheels and it only weighed 2150 pounds empty.

Tire failure is an expensive, time-wasting nuisance and it can be extremely dangerous. Changing a tire on the side of a busy road is intimidating. Replacing a tire can be expensive if you are in the middle of nowhere, not to mention the damage a blowout can do to your trailer.

For those of you who are not familiar with the 2010 Jay Feather Sport 165, the GVWR is 3500 pounds, but it weighs 2910 pounds empty and 2982 pounds with propane. A full tank of fresh water chews up another 249 pounds. That leaves a measly 269 pounds for cargo. My original sidewalls showed the tires were rated to carry 1660 pounds at 65 PSI (total 3320 pounds). Stamped into each wheel was the same 1660 pound rating. Keep in mind that the GVWR is 3500 pounds, but the GAWR (as indicated on the sticker on the trailer) is only 3300 pounds. I assume it's because part of the weight is on the tongue, but how much is really on the tongue? My weight distributing hitch is designed to take weight off the rear axle of the TV and distribute it to the TV's front axle AND the trailer's axle. In short, even with a minimal amount of cargo, I am essentially at the limit of my trailer's axle rating, as well as the ratings of my wheels and tires. I am not comfortable running my components near 100% of their rated capacity and I don't know why anyone would be. So, what did I gain with my swap? Some peace of mind. I am no longer running on the bleeding edge. My new wheels are rated at 2040 pounds each. My new tires are rated to carry 1870 pounds each - and I get to run 'em at 50 PSI, not 65. Because they are larger, my new tires rotate 10% slower. That can't be bad for the tires or the wheel bearings. They also have a larger contact patch. Finally, D-rated 13-inch tires are not easy to find, especially if you are out on the road. By comparison, C-rated 14s are ubiquitous.
I sympathize with you. It sucks to have to deal with blown tires on a trip. And peace of mind is a valuable thing. But tread separation and blow outs are not the result of the tire size. There are hundreds of thousands if not millions of 13 in tires on travel trailers. I very rarely see trailers on the side of the road with blown tires. Heat is a tire's enemy. Tire quality, tire age, under pressure, running over the 65 mph rating, are all things that contribute to heat build up and tire failure. If you are running over weight, sure your bigger tires will be less prone to fail, but unless you swap out that axle, you are still "on the edge".

When you say "I get to run 'em at 50 PSI, not 65", are you saying your old tires didn't take 50 PSI? Or that you ran them at 65PSI? I've never seen a 13 in ST tire that takes 65. They all take 50PSI. Maybe you mean that you 14 in take 65? That would make sense.

Our old hybrid was also running the weights right the their limits. 3450# GVWR and the same tires as you, and likely the same axle.

You must boon dock a lot. That's the only reason I can see for carrying water. We never carry water. Why tow all that weight and eat up our cargo capacity?
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