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Old 02-24-2014, 07:09 PM   #1
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China tires

New 23mbh has them. Anyone having luck with them. How long do they last.
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Old 02-24-2014, 07:16 PM   #2
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Unfortunately there are currently NO ST trailer tires being made in the US (someone correct me if this has changed). Most are made in China. Some hold up fairly well and some, well, do not.
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Old 02-24-2014, 07:22 PM   #3
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I'm starting year 4 with my Chinese tires... oddly enough, the spare is made in Canada. I'm hoping to get through the season with them.
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Old 02-25-2014, 10:17 AM   #4
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Personally I think the issues with Chinese tires are greatly exaggerated. With the millions of them on the road now, I'm not seeing trailers on the side of the road with blown tires. But if you read the RV boards people will have you thinking that Chinese tire blow left and right. Just follow good practice and they should last a reasonable length of time.

Crabman, I believe that Goodyear has been making Marathons in Canada again.
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Old 02-25-2014, 10:26 AM   #5
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I think you can make a good tire or a bad tire in any country. My choice of ST tires is Maxxis and they are made in several countries including China.
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Old 02-25-2014, 11:02 AM   #6
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I've had Chinese Goodyear Tires ST225/75R15D on my TT since June of 2008. All I can say is... so far, so good. The OE was ST225/75R15C, but I moved to a load range D tire on the current set for a better margin of safety.
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Old 02-25-2014, 02:45 PM   #7
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IMHO, if an LT tire will fit then I would use that. If an LT tire will not fit then I would use the highest load rated ST tire that will fit. I note there is very little difference in price to go from a load range D tire to a load range E tire.

I spent a lot of hours reading about this on the web and talking to others when I got my 1995 Eagle last year. It appears there were significant problems with some brands over the years; it appears some brands have made improvements in recent years. I think a lot of trailer tire difficulties are due to overloading and driving too fast.

It also appears that the RV industry sizes the suspension components to be "just enough". I didn't like that and retrofitted so that axles and tires were at 80% of rated capacity.

I never read where someone had a problem because they were towing with too big a truck, too strong of axles, tires with too much capacity, ...
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Old 02-25-2014, 04:14 PM   #8
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Quote:
I never read where someone had a problem because they were towing with too big a truck, too strong of axles, tires with too much capacity, ...
IMHO, it is possible to have problems with axles that are "too strong," and with tires that have "too much capacity". The problem that may arise is "too much vibration" being subjected to the trailer as it bounces down the roadway. While an upgrade to the next rating level may be acceptable (eg, D rated tire upgraded to E rated), I wouldn't recommend going from a C rated tire to an E rated tire (assuming it would fit). Same analysis with axles.
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Old 02-26-2014, 04:16 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldermike View Post
I think you can make a good tire or a bad tire in any country. My choice of ST tires is Maxxis and they are made in several countries including China.
I have been in contact with the corporate headquarters of Maxxis a while back (about 2 years ago), and they assured me that all their tires are made in Thailand, but in a factory built and operated to U.S. specs. I replaced all four of my Chinese made Goodyear Marathons (two of which blew out just sitting parked on my property) with Maxxis, and have not had any problems since. I do keep them inflated to the max 80#, however.
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Old 02-26-2014, 07:48 AM   #10
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I think WIBadger makes a good point. To extend that point a little, I suggest that some study and thought of the tires and suspension system of the trailer is required, as is a trip to the scale, loaded the way you intend to travel. Then you will know what loads are actually being carried by the system.

In my case, the axles were at 102% of capacity and the tires were at 106% of capacity; I assume that is pretty much how it was designed. I reworked with greater axle and tire capacity. I kept the spring suspension the same, due exactly to the "vibration" issue that WBadger points out. The original tires were load range C ST tires which required replacement. I now have load range E LT tires which I inflate to the psi for the load they are carrying according to the inflation chart from the manufacturer. The trailer tires are consistently cool (based on my highly scientific method of laying my hand on the tires - they have never felt much warmer than the ambient temperature).

Continuing the issue that WIBadger raised, why don't trailers have shock absorbers? Why is there only a spring suspension (at least for those of us with the traditional leaf spring suspension rather than the torsion suspension axles)?
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