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Old 03-14-2016, 08:48 AM   #21
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wags999, I understand your point that nothing is perfect But my class A, which I owned for 13 years never had a door separate and there were close to 40 of them. It's been on some pretty rough roads in the desert, from Glamis to Quartzite.


Probably better material yes, but it can be done. At the Jayco TT price point I would still hope so.


You'll probably find a much larger percentage that don't have separation issues. You know a lot more about cabinet making than I do, but IMO if the door is designed and built properly it shouldn't happen. Hopefully it's a isolated issue in his TT.


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Old 03-14-2016, 09:42 AM   #22
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I too have the same issue and have a warranty in process.
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Old 03-14-2016, 09:48 AM   #23
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jconner, does it look like there is any dried glue visible in the separation area. What year is your TT?


In Jayco's brochure under interior it says (glued and screwed cabinetry).


Maybe the doors are exempt. Wireman
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:08 AM   #24
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If a panel door is properly made, it will not come apart, no matter how much the humidity and temperature swings. A properly glued joint will split the wood before the glue line fails.
Generally, that's true. Especially when you are gluing two (or more) boards together with the grain going in the same direction. That may not be the case however, where the grain of one "board" is glued to another "board" going in a perpendicular fashion, as in a stile/rail configuration such as in a 5 piece door.

Some have talked about looking for signs of glue in the joint. Sometimes, the glue is not that evident even though it is there. When the stile and rail are clamped together there is little space for glue so it is either absorbed by the wood or squeezed out. Sometimes it only appears to be a shiny coating on the wood surface as opposed to a similar piece of wood without glue.

Most of what I've seen on this thread are issues related to excessive humidity.
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:11 AM   #25
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It's got to be happening due to poor manufacturing processes (I'd guess either being stingy on adhesive, or maybe a switch to an inferior brand of glue). I've also been all over in the last 4 years, spending 1.5 years in the Seattle area humidity, about the same amount of time in the Arizona desert, and all over the USA. Every woodwork joint is holding tight. Include many thousands of miles bouncing on roads to the equation, too.
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:30 AM   #26
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SmokerBill, I agree, if RV builders can't figure out how to keep cupboard doors together in this day and age they really either don't care or the quality control is basic at best.
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Old 03-14-2016, 01:58 PM   #27
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They make 1000's of RV's a year. Each with a number of doors. To get a few failures whatever the cause is, is not a big deal. It's an easy fix, it's wood and wood will move. Most times not enough to cause a problem, but sometimes it does. Could be wood a few % wetter than normal, door build during a very high humidity period, or a very low humidity period. And sometimes too much or too little glue is used, or the glue is not dried properly before finishing, could be a tooling issue also. It could also just be nature. Could be 1000 reasons. This is not the end of the world.

5 minutes and a clamp or even a bungee cord and it can be fixed. Out of everything that could go wrong in an RV this is not the hill to die on.

Do people call builders terrible and cheap if their drywall cracks? Or paint chips?

But it does remind me why the last 10 years or so I had my shop, I concentrated on Commercial, where the emotion is taken out of the equation.
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Old 03-14-2016, 02:01 PM   #28
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SmokerBill, I agree, if RV builders can't figure out how to keep cupboard doors together in this day and age they really either don't care or the quality control is basic at best.
Guess we need to go back to the OEM of the wood...God made wood to move. not every piece of wood moves exactly the same. Has nothing to do about figure out a way to keep cupboards together... I dare say 99.9% have zero issues..
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Old 03-14-2016, 02:15 PM   #29
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I'll check to see if there are any signs of glue. The TT is a 2015 29QBS.
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:38 PM   #30
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They make 1000's of RV's a year. Each with a number of doors. To get a few failures whatever the cause is, is not a big deal. It's an easy fix, it's wood and wood will move. Most times not enough to cause a problem, but sometimes it does. Could be wood a few % wetter than normal, door build during a very high humidity period, or a very low humidity period. And sometimes too much or too little glue is used, or the glue is not dried properly before finishing, could be a tooling issue also. It could also just be nature. Could be 1000 reasons. This is not the end of the world.

5 minutes and a clamp or even a bungee cord and it can be fixed. Out of everything that could go wrong in an RV this is not the hill to die on.

Do people call builders terrible and cheap if their drywall cracks? Or paint chips?

But it does remind me why the last 10 years or so I had my shop, I concentrated on Commercial, where the emotion is taken out of the equation.
I appreciate your insight into this situation however, it's difficult putting forth years of proven information to someone who either has an agenda or only makes "arguments" based on general feelings. Might as well stop now cuz he ain't listening .
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