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Old 11-26-2023, 10:08 AM   #1
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Excessive Moisture Inside of Windows

We just spent 4 nights on Cossatot Reef RV park in Arkansas. Beautiful place! The temperature ranged in the 29-32 degree range each night. We kept the trailer at a comfortable 71 degrees at night using the furnace and a space heater.

Each morning, I would wake up to massive amounts of moisture on the inside of the windows. So much in fact, that it was running all along the window sills and down the walls in places. (See photos)

Single pane windows obviously. Have all RV's always come with single pane windows or is this something new and cheesy just to cut cost? I don't remember this ever being a problem with RV's I have used in the past.

I did a little searching and found that double pane window are available. Not sure yet if they would be available for my Jayflight 263RBS at this point.

I put a MaxxAir Fan Deluxe in my trailer. It moves a lot of air. I got the idea of running it at 10% during the night to help with the moisture. Unfortunately, even at 10% it moves too much air and made the furnace run continuously. So, I shut it off after a couple of hours.

The fourth night, I just ran the fan for 30 minutes on max after we took our showers. Both methods helped reduce the moisture but, there is still way too much.

Thoughts on double pane windows? Any other solutions?



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Old 11-26-2023, 10:54 AM   #2
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Thermal pane windows have always been optional on most JAYCO units. Leaving the ceiling vent open a tad usually helps, but the only way to completely end the condensation is to stop breathing with the single pane windows..
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Old 11-26-2023, 11:04 AM   #3
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I don't camp much in cold weather although sometimes I do. What I found was that instead of leaving the fan on low for an extended period of time, to go ahead once or twice a day and open the vents (or a couple of windows) all the way and run the fan on high for 5~10 minutes. While it does get cold when doing this, most of the moisture inside the RV will be sucked out by the fan and then you can shut off the fan and close the vents (or windows) and let the heater run again. This will save a lot propane although it does seem like a waste of heat (propane or electric), but certainly a lot less waste than having the furnace run at nearly 100% for an extended time. ~CA

BTW, switching to double pane windows is not a simple task and rarely have I read of anyone ever doing that (for an RV).
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Old 11-26-2023, 12:47 PM   #4
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You might buy a dehumidifier.
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Old 11-26-2023, 02:00 PM   #5
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I cold weather camp often. We have an HTT, they are well known for condensation issues. Key is giving the moisture away to escape. Moisture is attracted towards cold. So always leave a vent, a window or two open. Allow that moisture a way to escape.

RV dual pane windows are great for sound reduction not for insulation. They are two layers of laminated glass. Single pane RV glass has an r-value of about 0.78. Daul pane RV windows are about 1.1, not much of an improvement.

To deal with condensation we always leave our bathroom vent cracked open up to an inch. All year, it is never fully closed. We also keep windows cracked in the sleeping areas.

Showering and cooking is great activities for adding moisture to the air.

When showering have the vent wide open, fan on high, crack open a window near the bathroom. Leave on for 45 minutes post shower.

Cooking, just like showering. Have the vent open and on, use a rear burner if possible, for a better capture of the moisture. Leave the fan on for a while after cooking.

When we are cool weather camping, the DW insists on an electric site. So we use electric heat. In turn, because I'm not paying extra, we leave our door wide open for hours. This strongly encourages the moisture a way out.

If you have the room, consider a small dehumidifier, I would place it in the shower, and let it drain down that drain.

Good luck
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Old 11-26-2023, 06:55 PM   #6
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Quote:
Each morning, I would wake up to massive amounts of moisture on the inside of the windows. So much in fact, that it was running all along the window sills and down the walls in places. (See photos)
Open a window slightly, open a vent, slightly, you will not believe the amount of moisture we breath out sleeping, and how much we produce with making coffee, cooking, and just living in an RV. It is a very small space and we produce a very large amount of moisture. It is less humid outside than inside when it comes to RVs.


There are volumes of information on humidity and RVs including likely in your owner's manual. You can spend a small fortune on humidifiers but it is better to vent the RV, It won't run up your heating bill, and avoid all of the issues and expense.


Just open the vent, don't run the fan at night.
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Old 11-26-2023, 07:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
Thermal pane windows have always been optional on most JAYCO units. Leaving the ceiling vent open a tad usually helps, but the only way to completely end the condensation is to stop breathing with the single pane windows..
Stop breathing. Now, there's a thought......
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Old 11-26-2023, 07:18 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by CAG View Post
Open a window slightly, open a vent, slightly, you will not believe the amount of moisture we breath out sleeping, and how much we produce with making coffee, cooking, and just living in an RV. It is a very small space and we produce a very large amount of moisture. It is less humid outside than inside when it comes to RVs.


There are volumes of information on humidity and RVs including likely in your owner's manual. You can spend a small fortune on humidifiers but it is better to vent the RV, It won't run up your heating bill, and avoid all of the issues and expense.


Just open the vent, don't run the fan at night.
Will give it a try next trip.
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